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Daily News Summary

An electronic digest of media coverage of interest to members of The Florida Bar compiled each workday by the Public Information and Bar Services Department. Electronic links are only active in today's edition. For information on previous articles, please contact the publishing newspaper directly.

Dec. 19, 2013

--Legislature--

LAWMAKERS ADMIT LOSING REDISTRICTING RECORDS -- The Florida Current, http://www.thefloridacurrent.com, Dec. 19, 2013. [Also: FLA. THREW AWAY RECORDS RELATED TO REDISTRICTING -- Tampa Tribune, http://www.tbo.com, Dec. 19, 2013.]
The League of Women Voters is involved in a lawsuit against the Florida Legislature, challenging the 2012 political realignment. Under two 2010 constitutional amendments -- which Republican legislative leaders bitterly fought -- lawmakers were forbidden to consider incumbency, party affiliation or other partisan factors in redrawing the state House and Senate lines and the 27 congressional district boundaries. Just last week, the Florida Supreme Court ruled that lawmakers can be required to testify about how they decided on the new districts. This week, House and Senate leaders admitted that some records of their research have been destroyed. They said deletion was done in keeping with existing policies on record maintenance. If the lawsuit in Leon County Circuit Court is successful, legislators next session could be forced to amend the district maps before the 2014 elections.

--Criminal Justice Issues--

IN WHAT MAY BE FIRST STATE CASE, MIAMI-DADE JURY CONVICTS MAN OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING -- Miami Herald, http://www.miamiherald.com, Dec. 19, 2013.
The Miami-Dade State Attorney's Office has successfully prosecuted what it believes to be the first human trafficking criminal case in Florida since a new law went into effect in 2012. A jury found David Salomon guilty of one count of human trafficking involving the commercial sexual exploitation of a minor. The state Legislature in 2012 passed the Safe Harbor Act, under which victims could be transferred to specialized short-term safe houses for 30 days, where they would be assessed for long-term placements, instead of taken to jail. The Miami-Dade State Attorney's Office has created a human trafficking unit to help implement the new law.

--Civil Justice Issues--

MIAMI-DADE JURY AWARDS $15 MILLION TO FAMILY IN QUINTUPLE-DEATH TRAFFIC DEATH -- Miami Herald, http://www.miamiherald.com, Dec. 13, 2013. [Also: PARENTS GET $15 MILLION AFTER DRUNKEN DRIVER KILLED SON -- Daily Business Review, http://www.dailybusinessreview.com, Dec. 13, 2013.]
A civil jury this week awarded more than $15 million in damages to the parents of one of the victims of a 2011 gruesome drunk-driving wreck on Interstate 95 in North Miami-Dade. The driver, Carlos Lacayo, remains a fugitive. Lawyer Edward Blumberg represented the family of victim Emerson Kastenholz. An arrest warrant was issued charging Lacayo, 26, with five counts of DUI manslaughter and vehicular homicide, but Lacayo had vanished, and remains missing. He faces up to 75 years in prison if convicted. The civil lawsuit was filed on behalf of Kastenholz’s parents, Michael and Kathleen, each of whom testified about the effects of their son’s death. The judge had already ruled that Lacayo was liable for Kastenholz’s death. Lacayo was represented during the four-day trial by a lawyer hired by his car insurance company.

--Other--

JUDGE TYRIE A. BOYER: 1924-2013 -- Florida Times-Union (requires subscription), http://www.jacksonville.com, Dec. 19, 2013.
Judge Tyrie A. Boyer, the son of a sharecropper who rose to become an appellate judge and the law partner of a former mayor, died Tuesday [Dec. 17] night. He was 89 and had been in failing health. Colleagues and family described him as an academic scholar who retained the working man’s touch. Judge Boyer liked to delve into his law books and wrote three volumes of appellate opinions. Judge Boyer practiced law for several years until he was elected judge of the Civil Court of Record of Duval County in 1960, the youngest judge in the state at that time. In 1963, he was appointed by Gov. Farris Bryant to the Circuit Court. He was twice re-elected without opposition. He retired in January 1967 and returned to private law practice. In 1973, Gov. Reubin Askew named him to Florida’s First District Court of Appeal. He later served a two-year term as chief judge. His specialty was property law litigation and, as a judge, he sought to clear up the ambiguity of multiple opinions dealing with the issue, his son said. Last year, the Jacksonville Bar Association presented Judge Boyer with the Raymond Ehrlich Award for professionalism.

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[Revised: 12-20-2013]