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Daily News Summary

An electronic digest of media coverage of interest to members of The Florida Bar compiled each workday by the Public Information and Bar Services Department. Electronic links are only active in today's edition. For information on previous articles, please contact the publishing newspaper directly.


Links to online newspapers

Oct. 21, 2013

--Judiciary--

ED SCALES APPOINTED TO APPEALS COURT -- Florida Keys News, http://keysnews.com, Oct. 19, 2013. [Also: KEY WEST LAWYER NAMED TO 3RD DCA -- Daily Business Review (requires subscription), http://www.dailybusinessreview.com, Oct. 21, 2013.]
Gov. Rick Scott appointed Key West attorney Edwin A. Scales III to the Third District Court of Appeal, which issues rulings on Monroe County criminal and civil court appeals. Scales is the first Monroe County lawyer appointed to the Third District Court of Appeal bench since its creation in 1957, according to the governor's office. Scales is currently the general counsel for the Florida Citrus Commission, vice chair of the Florida Keys Community College Board of Trustees, vice chair of the Florida Commission on Ethics and is a member of The Florida Bar Board of Governors. Scales fills a vacancy created by the resignation of Judge Angel A. Cortinas.

OCALA NATIVE APPOINTED TO CIRCUIT COURT BENCH -- Ocala Star Banner, http://www.ocala.com, Oct. 19, 2013.
On Sept. 10, Gov. Rick Scott appointed Ocala native Christi Underwood as a circuit judge for the 9th Judicial Circuit, which includes Orlando. She enrolled in the University of Florida law school at age 32. From there, Underwood practiced construction law in the Orlando area. Ten years ago she started her own firm and continued handling construction-related legal matters as an attorney, mediator and arbitrator. Underwood has fond memories of growing up in Ocala, which she recalled as “a small town, a very comfortable town.”

ATTORNEY BRASINGTON APPOINTED AS JUDGE FOR 8TH CIRCUIT -- Gainesville Sun, http://www.gainesville.com, Oct. 18, 2013.
Gainesville attorney Monica Brasington was appointed as a judge to the 8th Judicial Circuit Court bench by Gov. Rick Scott, filling a vacancy created in June by the retirement of Judge David Glant. Brasington, 40, has been a partner with Miller & Brasington since 2006, practicing elder and special needs law, according to a statement released Friday [Oct. 18] from Scott’s office. Brasington is the vice president of the Estate Planning Council of North Florida and program chair of the James C. Adkins, Jr. American Inn of Court. She received her bachelor’s and law degrees from the University of Florida.

--Legal Profession--

FSU COLLEGE OF LAW RANKS 9TH IN NATION FOR BEST VALUE -- FSView, http://www.fsunews.com, Oct. 20, 2013.
Earlier this month, The National Jurist placed Florida State University College of Law at No. 9 in the nation for best value. FSU's College of Law is the lone law school from Florida on this list. To determine best value law schools, The National Jurist magazine uses a formula that considers institutions that will not overcharge and that enable students to pass the bar and find a job in their particular law discipline. Revered law schools such as Georgetown, Harvard and Stanford did not make the list, leaving applicants deliberating if the debt is really worth it. Despite value, any law school is expensive, and most students will have some kind of debt after graduating. Last year, FSU Law graduates had an average of $73,114 in amassed debt.

FAMU HONORS ORIGINAL LAW SCHOOL GRADUATES AT BANQUET -- The Famuan, http://www.thefamuanonline.com, Oct. 20, 2013.
Florida A&M University honored its original law school graduates at the Inaugural Distinguished Alumni Banquet Thursday [Oct. 17] evening. Members from the graduating classes of 1954 through 1968 were reunited at the banquet. The Florida Legislature voted to close FAMU's College of Law in 1968. In 2006, the school reopened at its new location in Orlando. Thirteen of the surviving graduates shared some of their experiences and were also recognized for their awards and accomplishments. Elbert Hatchett, a 1966 graduate, said the law school was small, but the professors made sure students understood the material. He added that he is happy to have been a part of a rich tradition.

BREVARD'S WOMEN LAWYERS POWER UP -- Florida Today, http://www.floridatoday.com, Oct. 19, 2013.
Judge Lisa Davidson remembers being a lawyer and new mom in the 1980s and recalls how during the next several years, a group of women lawyers would gather for lunch. The group didn't have a lot of traction in its early days, but it eventually became the Brevard County Association for Women Lawyers. The group, a chapter of the Florida Association for Women Lawyers, was rewarded last year for having at least a 10 percent increase in membership. Statewide, the organization boasts about 3,500 to 4,000, FAWL immediate past president Laura Wendell said. BCAWL is considered a valuable asset to those who are involved, avocating and raising awareness for hot-button topics such as the significant gender gap in the legal profession and the number of women who become partners in their firms.

LAWYER TO YOUNG PROFESSIONALS: GET INVOLVED -- South Florida Sun-Sentinel, http://www.sun-sentinel.com, Oct. 19, 2013.
The Sentinel interviews Terrance Hill from Fort Lauderdale, an associate at the Goldstein Law Group and president-elect for TJ Reddick Bar Association for a term beginning May 2014. The TJ Reddick Bar Association was established in 1982 as the first minority Bar association in Broward County, to promote professionalism and assure that ethical standards of the law are upheld. Hill notes the importance of the organization, saying "it fills a major void by offering mentorship for young minority lawyers. It focuses on representing those who typically do not have much of a voice in the community and those who cannot speak for themselves, and is the only minority Bar Association in Broward County." His advice to young professionals is to "get involved by making yourself available and ready to perform any task required."

QUESTIONS OVER CASE'S HANDLING PRECEDED DEPARTURE OF HILLSBOROUGH'S CHIEF PROSECUTOR -- Tampa Bay Times, http://www.tampabay.com, Oct. 20, 2013
The last 10 months of Karen Stanley's career as chief staff prosecutor in the Hillsborough State Attorney's Office were clouded by questions about her handling of a case involving Tampa real estate attorney Henry Sorensen, accused of felony forgery. Stanley and Hillsborough State Attorney Mark Ober say disputes over Stanley's handling of the Sorensen case had nothing to do with her decision to resign from the State Attorney's Office in July and run for election as a judge, a move that surprised many in Hillsborough County's closely knit legal community.


--Criminal Justice Issues--

CRIMINAL TURNED LAW STUDENT SAYS PRISON NO PLACE FOR SOME YOUNG OFFENDERS -- Tampa Tribune, http://www.tbo.com, Oct. 19, 2013.
At 16, Reginald "Dwayne" Betts' life might have spiraled downward after he was sentenced to prison for carjacking someone, ultimately spending eight years behind bars. Instead, in a remarkable turnaround, he embraced his original love of reading, got a college degree and now is in his first year of studies at Yale Law School. Betts, 32, has become a national spokesman for a program called the Campaign for Youth Justice, which is fighting the practice of trying troubled youth in adult courts instead of in juvenile justice systems. Betts visited the Center for Manifestation church in East Tampa on Saturday [Oct. 19] for a forum on juvenile justice, organized by the Tampa Interfaith Coalition for Juvenile Justice, the Southern Poverty Law Center and the Campaign for Youth Justice. Speakers blasted the "prison industrial complex" that is driven by profit and leaves children with the lifelong scar of a felony conviction, making it hard to find work and an apartment.

--Other--

SOUTHWEST FLORIDA PILLAR LLOYD G. HENDRY DIES AT THE AGE OF 91 -- Fort Myers News-Press, http://www.news-press.com, Oct. 21, 2013.
Lloyd G. Hendry, the mild-mannered scion of one of Southwest Florida's founding families, former lawyer and keeper of family lore, died Thursday [Oct. 17] at age 91. His son, Henry Orrin Hendry, reminisced about his father and said he loved the practice of law. After WWII, Hendry attended law school at the University of Florida, joining Henderson, Franklin, Starnes and Holt, a new law firm in Fort Myers. Lloyd was associated with the firm for more than 30 years and opened his own firm in 1979 with his daughter Mary Hendry Sonne. Harry Hendry later joined them. Lloyd Hendry was well known for civic activities, serving in numerous organizations, including the Lee County Bar Association.

FRANK HOWARD, FORMER DADE SCHOOL BOARD ATTORNEY, DEAD AT 86 -- Miami Herald, http://www.miamiherald.com, Oct. 19, 2013. [Also: ADMIRED ATTORNEY -- Miami Herald, Letter to the Editor, http://www.miamiherald.com, Oct. 19, 2013.]
Frank Howard Jr., who during two decades as Dade County School Board attorney helped guide the district through desegregation, corporal punishment and school prayer, died Oct. 12. Howard and his law firm were contracted by the school board starting in the early 1970s. Over his 21 years as school board attorney, Howard issued a number of polarizing opinions, but perhaps his biggest case was a corporal punishment lawsuit that was heard by the U.S. Supreme Court. Howard argued on behalf of the school district, and the court upheld paddling, which is no longer a practice in schools. He earned his law degree from Harvard Law School, and also served as a Navy intelligence officer.

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[Revised: 10-22-2013]