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August 15, 2014
Biennial Bar rules proposals

The Board of Governors of The Florida Bar gives notice of filing with the Supreme Court of Florida, on or about October 1, 2014, a petition to amend the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar. The full text of the proposed amendments is printed below. Some are substantive revisions; others are merely editorial refinements. These items constitute the Bar’s annual filing of virtually all rules changes approved by the board since July 2012 but held for this biennial submission. The amendments may be filed as a single petition or multiple petitions. A copy of the proposed amendments may be requested by contacting the Rules Administrative Coordinator, The Florida Bar, 651 East Jefferson St., Tallahassee 32399-2300 or calling (850) 561-5600, ext. 5751. Members who desire to comment on these proposed amendments may do so within 30 days after the filing of the Bar’s petition. Comments should be filed directly with the clerk of the Supreme Court of Florida, and a copy must be served on the executive director of The Florida Bar. Rule 1-12.1, Rules Regulating The Florida Bar, governs these proceedings.


RULES REGULATING THE FLORIDA BAR




chapter 1 General
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subchapter 1-3
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RULE 1-3.3 OFFICIAL BAR NAME AND CONTACT INFORMATION
(a) Designation. Each member of The Florida Bar shallmust designate an official bar name, mailing address, business telephone number, and business e-mail address, if the member has one. If the physical location or street address is not the principal place of employment, the member must also provide an address for the principal place of employment. The Florida Bar may excuse a bar member from the requirement of providing an e-mail address if the bar member has been excused by the court from e-service or the bar member demonstrates that the bar member has no e-mail account and lacks Internet service at the bar member’s office.
(b) Changes. Each member shallmust promptly notify the executive director of any changes in any information required by this rule. The official bar name of each member of The Florida Bar shallmust be used in the course of the member’s practice of law. Members may change their official bar name by sending a request to the Supreme Court of Florida. The court must approve all official bar name changes.
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RULE 1-3.7 REINSTATEMENT TO MEMBERSHIP
(a) Eligibility for Reinstatement. [no change]
(b) Petitions Required. A member seeking reinstatement must file a petition with the executive director setting forth the reason for inactive status, retirement, or delinquency and showing good cause why the petition for reinstatement should be granted. The petitioner must beinclude all required information on a form approved by the board of governors and the petitioner will furnish such information on such form as the board of governors may require. The petition must be accompanied by a nonrefundable reinstatement fee of $150 and payment of all arrearages unless adjusted by the executive director with concurrence of the executive committee for good cause shown. Inactive members are not required to pay the reinstatement fee. No member will be reinstated if, from the petition or from investigation conducted, the petitioner is not of good moral character and morally fit to practice law or if the member is delinquent with the continuing legal education or basic skills course requirements.
If the executive director is in doubt as to approval of a petition the executive director may refer the petition to the board of governors for its action. Action of the executive director or board of governors denying a petition for reinstatement may be reviewed upon petition to the Supreme Court of Florida.
(c) Members Who Have Retired or Been Delinquent for Less Than 5 Years, But More Than 3 Years. Members who have retired or been delinquent for less than 5 years, but more than 3 years, must have completed 10 hours of continuing legal education courses for each year or portion of a year that the member had retired or was deemed delinquent.
(d) Members Who Have Retired or Been Delinquent for 5 Years or More. Members who have retired or have been deemed delinquent for a period of 5 years or longer will not be reinstated under this rule and must be readmitted upon application to and approval by the Florida Board of Bar Examiners and approval by the Supreme Court of Florida.
(e) Members Who Have Permanently Retired. [no change]
(f) Members Delinquent 60 Days or Less. Reinstatement from membership fees delinquency for payment of membership fees or completion of continuing legal education or basic skills course requirements accomplishedapproved within 60 days from the date of delinquency relates back to the date is effective on the last business day before the delinquency. Any member reinstated within the 60-day period is not subject to disciplinary sanction for practicing law in Florida during that time.
(g) Inactive Members. [no change]
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1-4. Board of Governors
RULE 1-4.3 COMMITTEES
The board of governors shallwill create an executive committee composed of the president, president-elect, chairs of the budget, communications, disciplinary review, program evaluation and legislation committees, president of the young lawyers division, 2 members of the board appointed by the president, and 3 members of the board elected by the board to act upon such matters asthat arise and require disposition between meetings of the board; a budget committee composed of 9 members with 3-year staggered terms; grievance committees as provided for in chapter 3; unlicensed practice of law committees as provided for in chapter 10; and a professional ethics committee.
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1-13. Time
Rule 1-13.1 Time
(a) Computation. In computing any period of time prescribed or allowed by the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar, the day of the act, event, or default from which the designated period of time begins to run shallwill not be included. The last day of the period so computed shallwill be included unless it is a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday, in which event the period shallwill run until the end of the next day that is not a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday.
(b) Additional Time After Service by Mail or E-mail. When a person has the right or is required to do some act or take some proceeding within a prescribed period after service of a notice or other paper and the notice or paper is served by mail or e-mail, 5 days shallwill be added to the prescribed period.
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Chapter 2 Bylaws of The Florida Bar
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2.7 Sections and Divisions
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BYLAW 2-7.3 CREATION OF SECTIONS AND DIVISIONS
Sections and divisions may be created or abolished by the board of governors as deemed necessary or desirable. The bar will maintain current lists of its standing committees and divisions and will post the lists on its website.
(a) Sections. The following sections of The Florida Bar have been created by the board of governors:

    (1) Administrative Law Section;
    (2) Alternative Dispute Resolution Section
    (3) Appellate Practice Section;
    (4) Business Law Section;
    (5) City, County and Local Government Law Section;
    (6) Criminal Law Section;
    (7) Elder Law Section;
    (8) Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law Section;
    (9) Environmental and Land Use Law Section;
    (10) Equal Opportunities Law Section;
    (11) Family Law Section;
    (12) General Practice, Solo and Small Firm Section;
    (13) Government Lawyer Section;
    (14) Health Law Section;
    (15) International Law Section;
    (16) Labor and Employment Law Section;
    (17) Public Interest Law Section;
    (18) Real Property, Probate, and Trust Law Section;
    (19) Tax Section;
    (20) Trial Lawyers Section; and
    (21) Workers’ Compensation Section.
(b) Divisions. The following divisions of The Florida Bar have been created by the board of governors:
    (1) Out-of-State Division; and
    (2) Young Lawyers Division.
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Chapter 3 RUles of Discipline
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3-5. Types of Discipline
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RULE 3-5.1 generally
A judgment entered, finding a member of The Florida Bar guilty of misconduct, shallwill include one or more of the following disciplinary measures:
(a) Admonishments. A Supreme Court of Florida order finding minor misconduct and adjudging an admonishment may direct the respondent to appear before the Supreme Court of Florida, the board of governors, grievance committee, or the referee for administration of the admonishment. A grievance committee report and finding of minor misconduct or the board of governors, upon review of suchthe report, may direct the respondent to appear before the board of governors or the grievance committee for administration of the admonishment. A memorandum of administration of an admonishment shall thereafterwill be made a part of the record of the proceeding after the admonishment is administered.
(b) Minor Misconduct. Minor misconduct is the only type of misconduct for which an admonishment is an appropriate disciplinary sanction.

    (1) Criteria. In the absence of unusual circumstances misconduct shallwill not be regarded as minor if any of the following conditions exist:
      (A) the misconduct involves misappropriation of a client’s funds or property;
      (B) the misconduct resulted in or is likely to result in actual prejudice (loss of money, legal rights, or valuable property rights) to a client or other person;
      (C) the respondent has been publicly disciplined in the past 3 years;
      (D) the misconduct involved is of the same nature as misconduct for which the respondent has been disciplined in the past 6 years;
      (E) the misconduct includes dishonesty, misrepresentation, deceit, or fraud on the part of the respondent; or
      (F) the misconduct constitutes the commission of a felony under applicable law.
    (2) Discretion of Grievance Committee. Despite the presence of 1 or more of the criteria described in subdivision (1) above, aA grievance committee may recommend an admonishment for minor misconduct or diversion to a practice and professionalism enhancement program when unusual circumstances are present, despite the presence of 1 or more of the criteria discribed in subpart (1) of this rule. When the grievance committee recommends an admonishment for minor misconduct or diversion to a practice and professionalism enhancement program under suchthese circumstances, its report shallwill contain a detailed explanation of the circumstances giving rise to the committee’s recommendation.
    (3) Recommendation of Minor Misconduct. If a grievance committee finds the respondent guilty of minor misconduct or if the respondent shall admits guilt of minor misconduct and the committee concurs, the grievance committee shallwill file its report recommending an admonishment, the manner of administration, the taxing of costs, and an assessment or administrative fee in the amount of $1,250 against the respondent. The report recommending an admonishment shallwill be forwarded to staff counsel and the designated reviewer for review. If staff counsel does not return the report to the grievance committee to remedy a defect therein the report, or if the report is not referred to the disciplinary review committee by the designated reviewer [as provided in rule 3-7.5(b)], the report shallwill then be served on the respondent by bar counsel. The report and finding of minor misconduct shall becomes final unless rejected by the respondent within 15 days after service of the report. If rejected by the respondent, the report shallwill be referred to bar counsel and referee for trial on complaint of minor misconduct to be prepared by bar counsel as in the case of a finding of probable cause. If the report of minor misconduct is not rejected by the respondent, notice of the finding of minor misconduct shallwill be given, in writing, to the complainant.
    (4) Rejection of Minor Misconduct Reports. The rejection by the board of governors of a grievance committee report of minor misconduct, without dismissal of the case, or remand to the grievance committee, shall beis deemed a finding of probable cause. The rejection of sucha report by a respondent shallbeis deemed a finding of probable cause for minor misconduct. UponAt trial before a referee following rejection by a respondent of a report of minor misconduct, the referee may recommend any discipline authorized under these rules.
    (5) Admission of Minor Misconduct. Within 15 days after a finding of probable cause by a grievance committee, aA respondent may tender a written admission of minor misconduct to bar counsel or to the grievance committee within 15 days after a finding of probable cause by a grievance committee,. An admission of minor misconduct may be conditioned upon acceptance by the grievance committee, but the respondent may not condition the admission of minor misconduct upon the method of administration of the admonishment or upon nonpayment of costs incurred in the proceedings. Such aAn admission may be tendered after a finding of probable cause (but before the filing of a complaint) only if such an admission has not been previously tendered. If the admission is tendered after a finding of probable cause, the grievance committee may consider suchthe admission without further evidentiary hearing and may either reject the admission, thereby affirming its prior action, or accept the admission and issue its report of minor misconduct. If a respondent’s admission is accepted by the grievance committee, the respondent may not thereafterlater reject a report of the committee recommending an admonishment for minor misconduct. If the admission of minor misconduct is rejected, suchthe admission shallmay not be considered or used against the respondent in subsequent proceedings.
(c) Probation. The respondent may be placed on probation for a stated period of time of not less than 6 months nor more than 5 years or for an indefinite period determined by conditions stated in the order. The judgment shallwill state the conditions of the probation, which may include but are not limited to the following:
    (1) completion of a practice and professionalism enhancement program as provided elsewhere in these rules;
    (2) supervision of all or part of the respondent’s work by a member of The Florida Bar;
    (3) the making ofrequired reportsing to a designated agency;
    (4) the satisfactory completion of a course of study or a paper on legal ethics approved by the Supreme Court of Florida;
    (5) such supervision over fees and trust accounts as the court may directs; or
    (6) restrictions on the ability to advertise legal services, either in type of advertisement or a general prohibition for a stated period of time, in cases in which rules regulating advertising have been violated or the legal representation in which the misconduct occurred was obtained by advertising.
The respondent will reimburse the bar for the costs of supervision. Upon failure of a respondent to comply with the conditions of the probation or a finding of probable cause as to conduct of the respondent committed during the period of probation, tThe respondent may be punished for contempt on petition by The Florida Bar, as provided elsewhere in these Rules Regulating The Florida Bar., on failure of a respondent to comply with the conditions of the probation or a finding of probable cause as to conduct of the respondent committed during the period of probation. An order of the court imposing sanctions for contempt under this rule may also terminate the probation previously imposed.
(d) Public Reprimand. A public reprimand shallwill be administered in the manner prescribed in the judgment but all such reprimands shallwill be reported in the Southern Reporter. Due notice shallwill be given to the respondent of any proceeding set to administer the reprimand. The respondent shallmust appear personally before the Supreme Court of Florida, the board of governors, any judge designated to administer the reprimand, or the referee, if required, and suchthis appearance shallwill be made a part of the record of the proceeding.
(e) Suspension. The respondent may be suspended from the practice of law for a definite period of time or an indefinite period thereafter to be determined by the conditions imposed by the judgment or order or until further order of the court. During suchthis suspension the respondent shall continues to be a member of The Florida Bar but without the privilege of practicing. A suspension of 90 days or less shalldoes not require proof of rehabilitation or passage of the Florida bar examination and the respondent shallwill become eligible for all privileges of members of The Florida Bar upon the expiration of the period of suspension. A suspension of more than 90 days shall requires proof of rehabilitation and may require passage of all or part of the Florida bar examination and the respondent shallwill not become eligible for all privileges of members of The Florida Bar until the court enters an order reinstating the respondent to membership in The Florida Bar. No suspension shallwill be ordered for a specific period of time in excess ofmore than 3 years.
Unless waived or modified by the court on motion of the respondent showing good cause, aAn order or opinion imposing a suspension of 90 days or less shallwill include a provision that prohibits the respondent from accepting new business from the date of the order or opinion until the end of the term of the suspension and shallwill provide that the suspension is effective 30 days from the date of the order or opinion so that the respondent may close out the practice of law and protect the interests of existing clients., unless the court orders otherwise.
Unless waived or modified by the court on motion of the respondent showing good cause, aAn order or opinion imposing a suspension of more than 90 days shallwill include a provision that prohibits the respondent from accepting new business from the date of the order or opinion until the date of the court’s order of reinstatement and shallwill provide that the suspension is effective 30 days from the date of the order or opinion so that the respondent may close out the practice of law and protect the interests of existing clients., unless the court orders otherwise.
(f) Disbarment. A judgment of disbarment terminates the respondent’s status as a member of the bar. Permanent disbarment shall precludes readmission. A former member who has not been permanently disbarred may only be admitted again upon full compliance with the rules and regulations governing admission to the bar. Except as might be otherwise provided in these rules, no application for readmission may be tendered within 5 years after the date of disbarment or sucha longer period asordered by the court might determine in the disbarment order and thereafteror at any time after that date until all court-ordered restitution and outstanding disciplinary costs have been paid.
Disbarment is the presumed sanction for lawyers found guilty of theft from a lawyer’s trust account or special trust funds received or disbursed by a lawyer as guardian, personal representative, receiver, or in a similar capacity such as trustee under a specific trust document. A respondent found guilty of such theft shallwill have the opportunity to offer competent, substantial evidence to rebut the presumption that disbarment is appropriate.
Unless waived or modified by the court on motion of the respondent, an order or opinion imposing disbarment shallwill include a provision that prohibits the respondent from accepting new business from the date of the order or opinion and shallwill provide that the disbarment is effective 30 days from the date of the order or opinion so that the respondent may close out the practice of law and protect the interests of existing clients.
(g) Disciplinary Revocation. [no change].
(h) Notice to Clients. Unless the court orders otherwise, Uponwhen service on the respondent is served with of an order of disbarment, disbarment on consent, disciplinary revocation, suspension, emergency suspension, emergency probation, or placement on the inactive list for incapacity not related to misconduct, or when a respondent has already served a required period of suspension before the issuance of an order described in this subpart, the respondent shallmust, unless this requirement is waived or modified in the court’s order, forthwithimmediately furnish a copy of the order or notice of commencement of the term of suspension and the length of the suspension to:
    (1) all of the respondent’s clients with matters pending in the respondent’s practice;
    (2) all opposing counsel or co-counsel in the matters listed in (1), above; and
    (3) all courts, tribunals, or adjudicative agencies before which the respondent is counsel of record; and
    (4) all state, federal, or administrative bars of which respondent is a member.
Within 30 days after service of the order the respondent shallmust furnish bar counsel with a sworn affidavit listing the names and addresses of all persons and entities that have been furnished copies of the order.
(i) Forfeiture of Fees. [no change].
(j) Restitution. In addition to any of the foregoing disciplinary sanctions and any disciplinary sanctions authorized elsewhere in these rules, the respondent may be ordered or agree to pay restitution to a complainant or other person if the disciplinary order finds that the respondent has received a clearly excessive, illegal, or prohibited fee or that the respondent has converted trust funds or property. In such instances tThe amount of restitution shallwill be specifically set forth in the disciplinary order or agreement and shallwill not exceed the amount by which a fee is clearly excessive, in the case of a prohibited or illegal fee shallwill not exceed the amount of suchthe fee, or in the case of conversion shallwill not exceed the amount of the conversion established in disciplinary proceedings. The disciplinary order or agreement shallwill also state to whom restitution shallmust be made and the date by which it shallmust be completed. Failure to comply with the order or agreement shallwill cause the respondent to become a delinquent member and will not preclude further proceedings under these rules. The respondent must provide the bar with telephone numbers and current addresses of all individuals or entities to whom the respondent is ordered to pay restitution.
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RULE 3-5.2 EMERGENCY SUSPENSION AND INTERIM PROBATION OR INTERIM PLACEMENT ON THE INACTIVE LIST FOR INCAPACITY NOT RELATED TO MISCONDUCT
(a) Petition for Emergency Suspension.
    (1) Great Public Harm. On petition of The Florida Bar, authorized by its president, president-elect, or executive director, supported by 1 or more affidavits demonstrating facts personally known to the affiants that, if unrebutted, would establish clearly and convincingly that an attorneya lawyer appears to be causing great public harm, the Supreme Court of Florida may issue an order suspending the said attorneylawyer on an emergency basis.
    (2) Discipline by Foreign Jurisdiction. On petition of The Florida Bar, authorized by its president, president-elect, or executive director, supported by a certified copy of an order of a foreign disciplinary jurisdiction suspending or disbarring an attorneya lawyer from the practice of law, the Supreme Court of Florida may issue an order suspending the attorneylawyer on an emergency basis. See subdivision (l) of rule 3-7.2.
    A petition for emergency suspension shallwill also constitute a formal complaint. The respondent shallwill have 20 days after docketing by the Supreme Court of Florida of its order granting the bar’s petition for emergency suspension in which to file an answer and any affirmative defenses to the bar’s petition.
(b) Petition for Interim Probation or Interim Placement on the Inactive List for Incapacity Not Related to Misconduct. On petition of The Florida Bar, authorized by its president, president-elect, or executive director, supported by 1 or more affidavits demonstrating facts personally known to the affiants that, if unrebutted, would establish clearly and convincingly that conditions or restrictions on a lawyer’s privilege to practice law in Florida are necessary for protection of the public, the Supreme Court of Florida may issue an order placing said lawyer on interim probation, the conditions of which shall be as provided in rule 3-5.1(c) ); or placing the lawyer on the inactive list for incapacity not related to misconduct as provided in rule 3-7.13. The Supreme Court of Florida may issue an order placing a lawyer on interim probation, under the conditions provided in subdivision (c) of rule 3-5.1 or placing the lawyer on the inactive list for incapacity not related to misconduct as provided in rule 3-7.13. Such order may be issued upon petition of The Florida Bar, authorized by its president, president-elect, or executive director, supported by 1 or more affidavits demonstrating facts personally known to the affiants that, if unrebutted, would establish clearly and convincingly that conditions or restrictions on a lawyer’s privilege to practice law in Florida are necessary for protection of the public. This petition shallwill also constitute the formal complaint. The respondent shallwill have 20 days after docketing by the Supreme Court of Florida of its order granting the bar’s petition for interim probation in which to file an answer and any affirmative defenses to the bar’s petition.
(c) Trust Accounts. Any order of emergency suspension or probation that restricts the attorney in maintaining a trust account shall, whenwill be served on the respondent and any bank or other financial institution maintaining an account against which said attorneythe respondent may make withdrawals,. The order will serve as an injunction to prevent saidthe bank or financial institution from making further payment from suchthe trust account or accounts on any obligation except in accordance with restrictions imposed by the court through subsequent orders issued by a court-appointed referee. Bar counsel will serve a copy of the Supreme Court of Florida’s order freezing a lawyer’s trust account via first class mail on the bank(s) in which the respondent’s trust account is held.
    (1) The court’s order appointing a referee under this rule may authorize the referee to determine entitlement to funds in the frozen trust account. Any client or third party claiming to be entitled to funds in the frozen trust account must file a petition requesting release of frozen trust account funds with the referee appointed in the case, accompanied by proof of entitlement to the funds.
    (2) Bar counsel and bar auditors will provide information to the appointed referee from bar audits and other existing information regarding persons claiming ownership of frozen trust account funds. The bar will notify persons known to bar staff in writing via regular first class mail of their possible interest in funds contained in the frozen trust account. The notices will include a copy of the form of a petition requesting release of frozen trust account funds, to be filed with the referee and instructions for completing the form. The bar will publish, in the local county or city newspaper published where the lawyer practiced before suspension, a notice informing the public that the lawyer’s trust account has been frozen and those persons with claims on the funds should contact listed bar counsel within 30 days after publication whenever possible.
      (A) If there are no responses to the notices mailed and published by the bar within 90 days from the date of the notice or if the amount in the frozen trust account is over $100,000, a receiver may be appointed by the referee to determine the person rightfully entitled to the frozen trust funds. The receiver will be paid from the corpus of the trust funds unless the referee orders otherwise.
      (B) In all other instances, a referee shall determine who is entitled to funds in the frozen trust account, unless the amount in the frozen trust account is $5,000 or less and no persons with potential entitlement to frozen trust account funds respond to the bar’s mailed or published notices within 90 days from the date of the notice. In such event, the funds will be unfrozen.
(d) Referee Review of Frozen Trust Account Petitions. The referee will determine when and how to pay the claim of any person entitled to funds in the frozen trust account after reviewing the bar’s audit report, the lawyer’s trust account records, the petitions filed or the receiver’s recommendations. If the bar’s audit report or other reliable evidence shows that funds have been stolen or misappropriated from the lawyer’s trust account, then the referee may hold a hearing. Subchapter 3-6 will not apply to a referee hearing under this rule. No pleadings will be filed, only petitions requesting release of frozen trust account funds. The parties to this referee proceeding will be those persons filing a petition requesting release of frozen trust account funds. The bar will not be a party to the proceeding. The referee’s order will be the final order in the matter unless one of the parties petitions for review of the referee’s order to the Supreme Court of Florida. The sole issue before the referee will be determination of ownership of the frozen trust account funds. The referee will determine the percentage of monies missing from the respondent’s trust account and the amounts owing to those petitioners requesting release of frozen trust account funds. A pro rata distribution is the method of distribution when there are insufficient funds in the account to pay all claims in full. The referee’s decision is subject only to direct petition for review of the referee’s final order by a party claiming an ownership interest in the frozen trust funds. The petition for review must be filed within 60 days of the referee’s final order. The schedule for filing of briefs in the appellate process will be as set forth in subchapter 3-7 of these rules.
(e) Separate Funds in Frozen Trust Accounts. The referee will order return of any separate funds to their rightful owner(s) in full upon their filing a petition requesting release of frozen trust account funds with proof of entitlement to the funds. Separate funds are monies deposited into the respondent’s trust account after the misappropriation, which are not affected by the misappropriation, and funds that have been placed into a separate segregated individual trust account under the individual client’s tax identification number.
(df) New Cases and Existing Clients. Any order of emergency suspension issued under this rule shallwill immediately preclude the attorney from accepting any new cases and unless otherwise ordered permit the attorney to continue to represent existing clients for only the first 30 days after issuance of suchan emergency order. Any fees paid to the suspended attorney during the 30-day period shallwill be deposited in a trust account from which withdrawals may be made only in accordance with restrictions imposed by the court.
(eg) Motions for Dissolution. The lawyer may move at any time for dissolution or amendment of an emergency order by motion filed with the Supreme Court of Florida, a copy of which will be served on bar counsel. SuchThe motion shallwill not stay any other proceedings and applicable time limitations in the case and, unless the motion fails to state good cause or is procedurally barred as an invalid successive motion, shallwill immediately be assigned to a referee designated by the chief justice. The filing of suchthe motion shallwill not stay the operation of an order of emergency suspension or interim probation entered under this rule.
(fh) Appointment of Referee. UpoOn entry of an order of suspension or interim probation, as provided above, the Supreme Court of Florida shallwill promptly appoint or direct the appointment of a referee. On determination that funds have been misappropriated from a lawyer’s trust account as provided above, the Supreme Court of Florida will promptly appoint or direct the appointment of a referee.
(gi) Hearing on Petition to Terminate or Modify Suspension. The referee shallwill hear a motion to terminate or modify a suspension or interim probation imposed under this rule within 7 days of assignment and submit a report and recommendation to the Supreme Court of Florida within 7 days of the date of the hearing. The referee shallwill recommend dissolution or amendment, whichever is appropriate, to the extent that bar counsel cannot demonstrate a likelihood of prevailing on the merits on any element of the underlying rule violations.
(hj) Successive Motions Prohibited. Successive motions for dissolution shallwill be summarily dismissed by the Supreme Court of Florida to the extent that they raise issues that were or with due diligence could have been raised in a prior motion.
(ik) Review by the Supreme Court of Florida. UpoOn receipt of the referee’s recommended order on the motion for dissolution or amendment, the Supreme Court of Florida shall will review and act upon the referee’s findings and recommendations regarding emergency suspensions and interim probations. This subdivision does not apply to a referee’s final order to determine ownership of funds in frozen trust accounts. These final orders of referee are reviewable by the Supreme Court of Florida only if a party timely files a petition for review pursuant to this rule. Briefing schedules following the petition for review will be as set forth in subchapter 3-7 of these rules.
(jl) Hearings on Issues Raised in Petitions for Emergency Suspension or Interim Probation and Sanctions. Once the Supreme Court of Florida has granted a petition for emergency suspension or interim probation as set forth in this rule, the referee appointed by the court shallwill hear the matter in the same manner as provided in rule 3-7.6, except that the referee shallwill hear the matter after the lawyer charged shall havehas answered the charges in the petition for emergency suspension or interim probation or when the time has expired for filing an answer. The referee shallwill issue a final report and recommendation within 90 days of appointment. If the time limit specified in this subdivision is not met, that portion of an emergency order imposing a suspension or interim probation shallwill be automatically dissolved, except upon order of the Supreme Court of Florida, provided that any other appropriate disciplinary action on the underlying conduct still may be taken.
(km) Proceedings in the Supreme Court of Florida. Consideration of the referee’s report and recommendation shallregarding emergency suspension and interim probation will be expedited in the Supreme Court of Florida. If oral argument is granted, the chief justice shallwill schedule oral argument as soon as practicable.
(ln) Waiver of Time Limits. The respondent may at any time waive the time requirements set forth in this rule by written request made to and approved by the referee assigned to hear the matter.
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Rule 3-5.3 Diversion of Disciplinary Cases to Practice and Professionalism Enhancement Programs
(a) Authority of Board. The board of governors is hereby authorized to establish practice and professionalism enhancement programs to which eligible disciplinary cases may be diverted as an alternative to disciplinary sanction.
(b) Types of Disciplinary Cases Eligible for Diversion. Disciplinary cases that otherwise would be disposed of by a finding of minor misconduct or by a finding of no probable cause with a letter of advice are eligible for diversion to practice and professionalism enhancement programs.
(c) Limitation on Diversion. A respondent who has been the subject of a prior diversion within 7 years shall not be is not eligible for diversion for the same type of rule violation for a period of 5 years after the earlier diversion. However, a respondent who has been the subject of a prior diversion and then is alleged to have violated a completely different type of rule at least 1 year after the initial diversion, will be eligible for a practice and professionalism enhancement program.
(d) Approval of Diversion of Cases at Staff or Grievance Committee Level Investigations. [no change].
(e) Contents of Diversion Recommendation. [no change].
(f) Service of Recommendation on and Review by Respondent. [no change].
(g) Effect of Rejection of Recommendation by Respondent. [no change].
(h) Diversion at Trial Level. [no change].
(i) Effect of Diversion. [no change].
(j) Effect of Completion of the Practice and Professionalism Enhancement Program. [no change].
(k) Effect of Failure to Complete the Practice and Professionalism Enhancement Program. [no change].
(l) Costs of Practice and Professionalism Enhancement Programs. [no change].

Comment

As to subdivision (c) of 3-5.3, a lawyer who agreed to attend the Advertising Workshop in 1 year would not be eligible for another such diversion for an advertising violation for a period of 5 years following the first diversion. However, that same lawyer would be eligible to attend the Advertising Workshop 1 year and a Trust Account Workshop for a completely different violation 1 year after the first diversion is completed.
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3-7. Procedures
RULE 3-7.1 CONFIDENTIALITY
(a) Scope of Confidentiality. All mattersrecords including files, preliminary investigation reports, interoffice memoranda, records of investigations, and the records in trials and other proceedings under these rules, except those disciplinary matters conducted in circuit courts, are property of The Florida Bar. All of those matters are confidential and will not be disclosed except as provided in these rules. When disclosure is permitted under these rules, it will be limited to information concerning the status of the proceedings and any information that is part of the public record as defined in these rules.
Unless otherwise ordered by this court or the referee in proceedings under these rules, nothing in these rules will prohibits the complainant, respondent, or any witness from disclosing the existence of proceedings under these rules, or from disclosing any documents or correspondence served on or provided to those persons except where disclosure is prohibited in Chapter 4 of these rules or by statutes and caselaw regarding attorney-client privilege.
    (1) Pending Investigations. Disciplinary matters pending at the initial investigatory and grievance committee levels are treated as confidential by The Florida Bar, except as provided in rules 3-7.1(e) and (k).
    (2) Minor Misconduct Cases. Any case in which a finding of minor misconduct has been entered by action of the grievance committee or board is public information.
    (3) Probable Cause Cases. Any disciplinary case in which a finding of probable cause for further disciplinary proceedings has been entered is public information. For purposes of this subdivision a finding of probable cause is deemed in those cases authorized by rule 3-3.2(a), for the filing of a formal complaint without the prior necessityrequirement of a finding of probable cause.
    (4) No Probable Cause Cases. Any disciplinary case that has been concluded by a finding of no probable cause for further disciplinary proceedings is public information.
    (5) Diversion or Referral to Grievance Mediation Program. Any disciplinary case that has been concluded by diversion to a practice and professionalism enhancement program or by referral to the grievance mediation program is public information upon the entry of such a recommendation.
    (6) Contempt Cases. Contempt proceedings authorized elsewhere in these rules are public information even thoughif the underlying disciplinary matter is confidential as defined in these rules.
    (7) Incapacity Not Involving Misconduct. Proceedings for placement on the inactive list for incapacity not involving misconduct are public information upon the filing of the petition with the Supreme Court of Florida.
    (8) Petition for Emergency Suspension or Probation. Proceedings seeking a petition for emergency suspension or probation are public information.
    (9) Proceedings on Determination or Adjudication of Guilt of Criminal Misconduct. Proceedings on determination or adjudication of guilt of criminal misconduct, as provided elsewhere in these rules, are public information.
    (10) Professional Misconduct in Foreign Jurisdiction. Proceedings based on disciplinary sanctions entered by a foreign court or other authorized disciplinary agency, as provided elsewhere in these rules, are public information.
    (11) Reinstatement Proceedings. Reinstatement proceedings, as provided elsewhere in these rules, are public information.
    (12) Disciplinary Resignations and Disciplinary Revocations. Proceedings involving petitions for disciplinary resignation or for disciplinary revocation as provided elsewhere in these rules, are public information.
(b) Public Record. [no change].
(c) Circuit Court Proceedings. [no change].
(d) Limitations on Disclosure. [no change].
(e) Response to Inquiry. [no change].
(f) Notice to Law Firms. [no change].
(g) Production of Disciplinary Records Pursuant to Subpoena. [no change].
(h) Notice to Judges. [no change].
(i) Evidence of Crime. [no change].
(j) Chemical Dependency and Psychological Treatment. [no change].
(k) Response to False or Misleading Statements. [no change].
(l) Disclosure by Waiver of Respondent. [no change].
(m) Maintaining Confidentiality Required by Rule or Law. [no change].
* * *
RULE 3-7.10 REINSTATEMENT AND READMISSION PROCEDURES
(a) Reinstatement; Applicability. [no change].
(b) Petitions; Form and Contents.
    (1) Filing. The original petition for reinstatement and 1 copy must be in writing, verified by the petitioner, and addressed to and filed with the Supreme Court of Florida in compliance with the Florida Rules of Civil Procedure and the Florida Rules of Judicial Administration. A copy must be served on Staff Counsel, The Florida Bar, 651 East Jefferson Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2300 in compliance with applicable court rules. The petition for reinstatement may not be filed until the petitioner has completed at least 80% of the term of that lawyer’s period of suspension.
    (2) Form and Exhibits. The petition must be in suchthe form and accompanied by suchthe exhibits as provided for elsewhere in this rule. The information required concerning the petitioner may include any or all of the following matters in addition to such any other matters asthat may be reasonably required to determine the fitness of the petitioner to resume the practice of law: criminal and civil judgments; disciplinary judgments; copies of income tax returns together with consents to secure original returns; occupation during suspension and employment related information; financial statements; and statement of restitution of funds that were the subject matter of disciplinary proceedings. In cases seeking reinstatement from incapacity, the petition must also include copies of all pleadings in the matter leading to placement on the inactive list and all such other matters as may be reasonably required to demonstrate the character and fitness of the petitioner to resume the practice of law.
(c) Deposit for Cost. The petition must be accompanied by proof of a deposit paid to The Florida Bar in suchthe amount as the board of governors prescribes to ensure payment of reasonable costs of the proceedings, as provided elsewhere in this rule.
(d) Reference of Petition for Hearing. The chief justice will refer the petition for reinstatement to a referee for hearing; provided, however, that no such referencereferral will be made until evidence is submitted showing that all costs assessed against the petitioner in all disciplinary or incapacity proceedings have been paid and restitution has been made.
(e) Bar Counsel. When a petition for reinstatement is filed, the board of governors or staff counsel, if authorized by the board of governors, may appoint bar counsel to represent The Florida Bar in the proceeding. The duties of such lawyers arelawyer’s duty is to appear at the hearings and to prepare and present to the referee evidence that, in the opinion of the referee or such lawyer, shouldwill be considered in passing upon the petition.
(f) Determination of Fitness by Referee Hearing. The referee to whom the petition for reinstatement is referred must conduct the hearing as a trial, in the same manner, to the extent practical, as provided elsewhere in these rules. The matter to decide isreferee must decide the fitness of the petitioner to resume the practice of law. In determining the fitness of the petitioner to resume the practice of lawmaking this determination, the referee will consider whether the petitioner has engaged in any disqualifying conduct, the character and fitness of the petitioner, and whether the petitioner has been rehabilitated, as further described in this subdivision. All conduct engaged in after the date of admission to The Florida Bar is relevant in proceedings under this rule.
    (1) Disqualifying Conduct. A record manifesting a deficiency in the honesty, trustworthiness, diligence, or reliability of a petitioner may constitute a basis for denial of reinstatement. The following are considered as disqualifying conduct:
      (A) unlawful conduct;
      (B) academic misconduct;
      (C) making or procuring any false or misleading statement or omission of relevant information, including any false or misleading statement or omission on any application requiring a showing of good moral character;
      (D) misconduct in employment;
      (E) acts involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation;
      (F) abuse of legal process;
      (G) financial irresponsibility;
      (H) neglect of professional obligations;
      (I) violation of an order of a court;
      (J) evidence of mental or emotional instability;
      (K) evidence of drug or alcohol dependency;
      (L) denial of admission to the bar in another jurisdiction on character and fitness grounds;
      (M) disciplinary action by a lawyer disciplinary agency or other professional disciplinary agency of any jurisdiction;
      (N) failure of a felony-suspended lawyer to submit proof that the affected lawyer’s civil rights have been restored; and
      (O) any other conduct that reflects adverselyadversely reflects upon the character or fitness of the applicant.
    (2) Determination of Character and Fitness. In addition to other factors in making this determination, the following factors shouldwill be considered in assigning weight and significance to prior conduct:
      (A) age at the time of the conduct;
      (B) recency of the conduct;
      (C) reliability of the information concerning the conduct;
      (D) seriousness of the conduct;
      (E) factors underlying the conduct;
      (F) cumulative effect of the conduct or information;
      (G) evidence of rehabilitation;
      (H) positive social contributions since the conduct;
      (I) candor in the discipline and reinstatement processes; and
      (J) materiality of any omissions or misrepresentations.
    (3) Elements of Rehabilitation. Merely showing that an individual is now living as and doing those things that should be done throughout life, although necessary to prove rehabilitation, does not prove that the individual has undertaken a useful and constructive place in society. Any petitioner for reinstatement from discipline for prior misconduct is required to produce clear and convincing evidence of such rehabilitation including, but not limited to, the following elements:
      (A) strict compliance with the specific conditions of any disciplinary, judicial, administrative, or other order, where applicable;
      (B) unimpeachable character and moral standing in the community;
      (C) good reputation for professional ability, where applicable;
      (D) lack of malice and ill feeling toward those who by duty were compelled to bring about the disciplinary, judicial, administrative, or other proceeding;
      (E) personal assurances, supported by corroborating evidence, of a desire and intention to conduct one’s self in an exemplary fashion in the future;
      (F) restitution of funds or property, where applicable; and
      (G) positive action showing rehabilitation by such things as a person’s community or civic service. Community or civil service is donated service or activity that is performed by someone or a group of people for the benefit of the public or its institutions.
    The requirement of positive action is appropriate for persons seeking reinstatement to the bar as well as for applicants for admission to the bar because service to one’s community is an essential obligation of members of the bar.
    (4) Educational Requirements.
      (A) In the case of a petitioner’s ineligibility to practice for a period of 3 years or longer under this rule, the petitioner must demonstrate to the referee that the petitioner is current with changes and developments in the law:
          (i) The petitioner must have completed at least 10 hours of continuing legal education courses for each year or portion of a year that the petitioner was ineligible to practice.
          (ii) The petitioner may further demonstrate that the petitioner is current with changes and developments in the law by showing that the petitioner worked as a law clerk or paralegal or taught classes on legal issues during the period of ineligibility to practice.
      (B) A petitioner who has been ineligible to practice for 5 years or more will not be reinstated under this rule until the petitioner has re-taken and provided proof in the lawyer’s petition for reinstatement that the lawyer has passed both the Florida portions of the Florida Bar Examination and the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE).
(g) Hearing; Notice; Evidence.
    (1) Notice. The referee to whom the petition for reinstatement is referred will fix a time and place for hearing, and notice of the hearing will be provided at least 10 days prior to the hearing to the petitioner, to lawyers representing The Florida Bar, and to such other persons aswho may be designated by the appointed referee to whom the petition is referred.
    (2) Appearance. Any persons to whom notice is given, any other interested persons, or any local bar association may appear before the referee in support of or in opposition to the petition at any time or times fixed for the hearings.
    (3) Failure of Petitioner to be Examined. For the failure of the petitioner to submit to examination as a witness pursuant to notice given, the referee will dismiss the petition for reinstatement unless good cause is shown for suchthe failure.
    (4) Summary Procedure. If after the completion of discovery bar counsel is unable to discover any evidence on which denial of reinstatement may be based and if no other person provides sameany relevant evidence, bar counsel may, with the approval of the designated reviewer and staff counsel, stipulate to the issue of reinstatement, including conditions for reinstatement. The stipulation must include a statement of costs as provided elsewhere in these Rules Regulating The Florida Bar.
    (5) Evidence of Treatment or Counseling for Dependency or Other Medical Reasons. If the petitioner has sought or received treatment or counseling for chemical or alcohol dependency or for other medical reasons that relate to the petitioner’s fitness to practice law, the petitioner must waive confidentiality of such treatment or counseling for purposes of evaluation of the petitioner’s fitness. The provisions of rule 3-7.1(d) are applicable to information or records disclosed under this subdivision.
(h) Prompt Hearing; Report. The referee to whom a petition for reinstatement has been referred by the chief justice will proceed to a prompt hearing, at the conclusion of which the referee will make and file with the Supreme Court of Florida a report that includes the findings of fact and a recommendation as to whether the petitioner is qualified to resume the practice of law. The referee must file the report and record in the Supreme Court of Florida.
(i) Review. Review of referee reports in reinstatement proceedings must be in accordance with rule 3-7.7.
(j) Recommendation of Referee and Judgment of the Court. If the petitioner is found unfit to resume the practice of law, the petition will be dismissed. If the petitioner is found fit to resume the practice of law, the referee will enter a report recommending, and the court may enter an order of, reinstatement of the petitioner in The Florida Bar; provided, however, that the reinstatement may be conditioned upon the payment of all or part of the costs of the proceeding and upon the making of partial or complete restitution to parties harmed by the petitioner’s misconduct that led to the petitioner’s suspension of membership in The Florida Bar or conduct that led to the petitioner’s incapacity; and further provided, however, if suspension or incapacity of the petitioner has continued for more than 3 years, the reinstatement may be conditioned upon the furnishing of such proof of competency as may be required by the judgment in the discretion of the Supreme Court of Florida,. which pProof may include certification by the Florida Board of Bar Examiners of the successful completion of an examination for admission to The Florida Bar subsequent to the date of the suspension or incapacity.
(k) Successive Petitions. No petition for reinstatement may be filed within 1 year following an adverse judgment upon a petition for reinstatement filed by or on behalf of the same person. In cases of incapacity no petition for reinstatement may be filed within 6 months following an adverse judgment under this rule.
(l) Petitions for Reinstatement to Membership in Good Standing.
    (1) Availability. Petitions for reinstatement under this rule are available to members placed on the inactive list for incapacity not related to misconduct and suspended members of the bar when the disciplinary judgment conditions their reinstatement upon a showing of compliance with specified conditions.
    (2) Style of Petition. Petitions must be styled in the Supreme Court of Florida and an original and 1 copy filed with the courtSupreme Court of Florida in accordance with the court’s filing requirements, including e-filing requirements where applicable. A copy must be served on Staff Counsel, The Florida Bar, 651 East Jefferson Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2300.
    (3) Contents of Petition. The petition must be verified by the petitioner and accompanied by a written authorization to the District Director of the Internal Revenue Service, authorizing the furnishing of certified copies of the petitioner’s tax returns for the past 5 years or since admission to the bar, whichever is greater. The authorization must be furnished on a separate sheet. The petition must have attached as an exhibit a true copy of all disciplinary judgments previously entered against the petitioner. It must also include the petitioner’s statement concerning the following:
      (A) name, age, residence, address, and number and relation of dependents of the petitioner;
      (B) the conduct, offense, or misconduct upon which the suspension or incapacity was based, together with the date of such suspension or incapacity;
      (C) the names and addresses of all complaining witnesses in any disciplinary proceedings that resulted in suspension; and the name and address of the referee or judge who heard suchthese disciplinary proceedings or of the trial judge, complaining witnesses, and prosecuting lawyer, if suspension was based upon conviction of a felony or misdemeanor involving moral turpitude;
      (D) the nature of the petitioner’s occupation in detail since suspension or incapacity, with names and addresses of all partners, associates in business, and employers, if any, and dates and duration of all suchthese relations and employments;
      (E) a statement showing the approximate monthly earnings and other income of the petitioner and the sources from which all such earnings and income were derived during saidthis period;
      (F) a statement showing all residences maintained during saidthis period, with names and addresses of landlords, if any;
      (G) a statement showing all financial obligations of the petitioner including but not limited to amounts claimed, unpaid, or owing to The Florida Bar Clients’ Security Fund or former clients at the date of filing of the petition, together with the names and addresses of all creditors;
      (H) a statement of restitution made for any and all obligations to all former clients and the Florida Bar Clients’ Security Fund and the source and amount of funds used for this purpose;
      (I) a statement showing dates, general nature, and ultimate disposition of every matter involving the arrest or prosecution of the petitioner during the period of suspension for any crime, whether felony or misdemeanor, together with the names and addresses of complaining witnesses, prosecuting lawyers, and trial judges;
      (J) a statement as to whether any applications were made during the period of suspension for a license requiring proof of good character for its procurement; and, as tofor each such application, the date and the name and address of the authority to whom it was addressed and its disposition;
      (K) a statement of any procedure or inquiry, during the period of suspension, covering the petitioner’s standing as a member of any profession or organization, or holder of any license or office, that involved the censure, removal, suspension, revocation of license, or discipline of the petitioner; and, as to each, the dates, facts, and the disposition, and the name and address of the authority in possession of these records:
      (L) a statement as to whether any charges of fraud were made or claimed against the petitioner during the period of suspension, whether formal or informal, together with the dates and names and addresses of persons making suchthese charges;
      (M) a concise statement of facts claimed to justify reinstatement to The Florida Bar;
      (N) a statement showing the dates, general nature, and final disposition of every civil action in which the petitioner was either a party plaintiff or defendant, together with dates of filing of complaints, titles of courts and causes, and the names and addresses of all parties and of the trial judge or judges, and names and addresses of all witnesses who testified in saidthis action or actions; and
      (O) a statement showing what amounts, if any, of the costs assessed against the accused lawyer in the prior disciplinary proceedings against the petitioner have been paid by the petitioner and the source and amount of funds used for this purpose.
    (4) Comments on Petition. UpoOn the appointment of a referee and bar counsel, copies of the petition will be furnished by the bar counsel to local board members, local grievance committees, and to such other persons as are mentioned in this rule. Persons or groups that wish to respond must direct their comments to bar counsel. The proceedings and finding of the referee will relate to those matters described in this rule and also to those matters tending to show the petitioner’s rehabilitation, present fitness to resume the practice of law, and the effect of suchthe proposed reinstatement upon the administration of justice and purity of the courts and confidence of the public in the profession.
    (5) Costs Deposit. The petition must be accompanied by a deposit for costs of $500.
(m) Costs.
    (1) Taxable Cost. Taxable costs of the proceedings must include only:
      (A) investigative costs, including travel and out-of-pocket expenses;
      (B) court reporters’ fees;
      (C) copy costs;
      (D) telephone charges;
      (E) fees for translation services;
      (F) witness expenses, including travel and out-of-pocket expenses;
      (G) travel and out-of-pocket expenses of the referee;
      (H) travel and out-of-pocket expenses of counsel in the proceedings, including the petitioner if acting as counsel; and
      (I) an administrative fee in the amount of $1250 when costs are assessed in favor of the bar.
    (2) Discretion of Referee. The referee has discretion to award costs and absent an abuse of discretion the referee’s award will not be reversed.
    (3) Assessment of Bar Costs. The costs incurred by the bar in any reinstatement case may be assessed against the petitioner unless it is shown that the costs were unnecessary, excessive, or improperly authenticated.
    (4) Assessment of Petitioner’s Costs. The referee may assess the petitioner’s costs against the bar in the event that there was no justiciable issue of either law or fact raised by the bar unless it is shown that the costs were unnecessary, excessive, or improperly authenticated.
(n) Readmission; Applicability. [no change].
* * *
RULE 3-7.11 GENERAL RULES OF PROCEDURE
(a) Time is Directory. [no change].
(b) Process. Every member of The Florida Bar is charged with notifying The Florida Bar of any change of mailing address, e-mail address (unless the lawyer has been excused by the bar or court from e-filing and e-service) orand military status. Mailing of registered or certified papers or notices prescribed in these rules to the last mailing address of an attorney as shown by the official records in the office of the executive director of The Florida Bar shall be sufficient notice and service unless this court shall direct otherwise. The bar may serve notice of formal complaints in bar proceedings by U.S. Postal Service certified mail return receipt requested to the bar member’s record bar address unless the Supreme Court of Florida directs other service. Every attorneylawyer of another state who is admitted pro hac vicepermitted to practice for the purpose ofin a specific case before a court of record of this statein Florida may be served by registered orU.S. Postal Service certified mail return receipt requested addressed to saidthe attorneylawyer in care of the Florida attorneylawyer who was associated or appeared with the attorneylawyer admitted pro hac vice in the specific case for which the out-of-state attorney was permitted to practice or addressed to saidthe attorneyFlorida lawyer at any address listed by the attorneylawyer in the pleadings in suchthe case. Provided, however, when a person is represented by counsel, service of process and notices shallmust be directed to counsel.
(c) Notice in Lieu of Process. Every member of The Florida Bar is within the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court of Florida and its agencies under these rules, and service of process is not required to obtain jurisdiction over respondents in disciplinary proceedings; but due process requires the giving of reasonable notice and suchthis notice shallwill be effectiveed by the service of the complaint upon the respondent by mailing a copy of the bar’s formal complaintthereof by registered or certified U.S. Postal Service mail return receipt requested to the last-known address of the respondent’s record bar address according to the records of The Florida Bar or sucha latermore current address asthat may be known to the person effecting the serviceserving the complaint or other process.
When the respondent is represented by counsel in thea referee proceedingmatter, due process is satisfied by the service of the formal complaint upon the respondent’s counsel by mailing a copy thereof by registered or certified mail return receipt requested to the last knownrecord bar address of the respondent’s counsel according to the records of The Florida Bar or sucha latermore current address asthat may be known to the person effecting the serviceserving the complaint.
All other correspondence between the bar and respondents or their counsel, including bar inquiries that require responses during the investigative stage of a disciplinary proceeding, may be made by e-mail to the respondent’s record bar e-mail address or the record bar e-mail address of respondent’s counsel. E-mail correspondence is encouraged in all instances except in service of a formal complaint or subpoena, or where a court directs otherwise. If a lawyer has been excused by the bar or court from e-filing and e-service, or service cannot be made by e-mail, service by first class postal mail is sufficient except where these rules or a court direct otherwise.
(d) Issuance of Subpoenas. Subpoenas for the attendance of witnesses’ attendance and the production of documentary evidence other thanexcept before a circuit court shallmust be issued as follows:
    (1) Referees. Subpoenas for the attendance of witnesses’ attendance and production of documentary evidence before a referee shallmust be issued by the referee and shallmust be served either in the manner provided by law for the service of process or by an investigator employed by The Florida Bar.
    (2) Grievance Committees. Subpoenas for the attendance of witnesses’ attendance and the production of documentary evidence shallmust be issued by the chair or vice-chair of a grievance committee in pursuance ofas part of an investigation authorized by the committee. SuchThese subpoenas may be served by any member of suchthe grievance committee, by an investigator employed by The Florida Bar, or in the manner provided by law for the service of process.
    (3) Bar Counsel Investigations. Subpoenas for the attendance of witnesses’ attendance and the production of documentary evidence before bar counsel when same is conductingin an initial investigation shallmust be issued by the chair or vice-chair of a grievance committee to which the matter will be assigned, if appropriate. SuchThese subpoenas may be served by an investigator employed by The Florida Bar or in the manner provided by law for the service of process.
    (4) After Grievance Committee Action, But Before Appointment of Referee. Subpoenas for the attendance of witnesses’ attendance and the production of documentary evidence before bar counsel when same is conducting further investigation after action by a grievance committee, but before appointment of a referee, shallmust be issued by the chair or vice-chair of the grievance committee to which the matter was assigned. SuchThese subpoenas may be served by an investigator employed by The Florida Bar or in the manner provided by law for the service of process.
    (5) Board of Governors. Subpoenas for the attendance of witnesses’ attendance and the production of documentary evidence before the board of governors shallmust be issued by the executive director and shallmust be served by an investigator employed by The Florida Bar or in the manner provided by law for the service of process.
    (6) Confidential Proceedings. If the proceeding is confidential, a subpoena shallmust not name the respondent but shallmust style the proceeding as “Confidential Proceeding by The Florida Bar under the Rules of Discipline.”
    (7) Contempt.
      (A) Generally. Any persons who, without adequate excuse, fail to obey such a subpoena served upon them under these rules, may be cited for contempt of this court in the manner provided by this rule.
      (B) Subpoenas for Trust Accounting Records. Members of the bar are under an obligation to maintain trust accounting records as required by these rules and, as a condition of the privilege of practicing law in Florida, may not assert any privilege personal to the lawyer that may be applicable to production of suchthese records in any disciplinary proceedings under these rules.
          (i) A respondent who has been found in willful noncompliance with a subpoena for trust accounting records may be cited for contempt under this rule only if the disciplinary agency that issued the subpoena shall have firsthas found that no good cause existed for the respondent’s failure to comply.
          (ii) The disciplinary agency that issued the subpoena shallmust hear the issue of noncompliance and issue findings thereonon the noncompliance within 30 days of a request for issuance of the notice of noncompliance.
    (8) Assistance to Other Lawyer Disciplinary Jurisdictions. UpoOn receipt of a subpoena certified to be duly issued under the rules or laws of another lawyer disciplinary jurisdiction, the executive director may issue a subpoena directing a person domiciled or found within the state of Florida to give testimony and/or produce documents or other thingsevidence for use in the other jurisdiction’s lawyer disciplinary proceedings as directed in the subpoena of the other jurisdiction. The practice and procedure applicable to subpoenas issued under this subdivision shallwill be that of the other jurisdiction, except that:
      (A) the testimony or production shallmust be only in the county whereinin which the person resides or is employed, or as otherwise fixed by the executive director for good cause shown; and
      (B) compliance with any subpoena issued pursuant to this subdivision and contempt for failure in this respect shallmust be sought as elsewhere provided inunder these rules.
(e) Oath of Witness. Every witness in every proceeding under these rules shallmust be sworn to tell the truth. Violation of this oath shall beis an act of contempt of this court.
(f) Contempt. When a disciplinary agency, as defined elsewhere in these rules, finds that a person is in contempt under these rules, suchthat person may be cited for contempt in the following manner:
    (1) Generally.
      (A) Petition for Contempt and Order to Show Cause. When a person is found in contempt by a disciplinary agency, bar counsel shallmust file a petition for contempt and order to show cause with the Supreme Court of Florida.
      (B) Order to Show Cause; Suspension for Noncompliance with Subpoena for Trust Accounting Records. On review of a petition for contempt and order to show cause, the supreme court may issue an order directing the person to show cause why suchthe person should not be held in contempt and appropriate sanctions imposed.
      On review of a petition for contempt and order to show cause for noncompliance with a trust accounting subpoena, the supreme court may also issue an order suspending the respondent from the practice of law in Florida until such time as the member fully complies with the subpoena and any further order of the court.
      The order of the supreme court shallmust fix a time for a response.
      (C) Response to Order to Show Cause.
          (i) Generally. Any member subject to an order to show cause shallmust file a response as directed by the court.
          (ii) Noncompliance with a Subpoena for Trust Account Records. Any member subject to an order to show cause for noncompliance with a subpoena for trust accounting records may request the court:
            a. within 10 days of the filing of the petition for contempt and order to show causeto withhold entry of an order of suspension, if filed within 10 days of the filing of the petition for contempt and order to show cause or such another time as the court may direct in the order to show cause, to withhold entry of an order of suspension; or
            b. at any time after entry of an order of suspension, to terminate or modify the order of suspension at any time after the order of suspension is issued. The court may terminate, modify, or withhold entry of an order of suspension if the member establishes good cause for failure to comply with the subpoena for trust account records.
      (D) Failure to Respond to Order to Show Cause. UpoOn failure to timely respond to an order to show cause, the matters alleged in the petition shall beare deemed admitted and the supreme court may enter a judgment of contempt and impose appropriate sanctions. Failure to respond may be an additional basis on which a judgment of contempt may be entered and sanctions imposed.for the supreme court to enter a judgment of contempt and to impose sanctions.
      (E) Reply of The Florida Bar. When a timely response to an order to show cause is filed, The Florida Bar shallwill have 10 days, or such another time period as the supreme court may order, from the date of filing in which to file a reply.
      (F) Supreme Court Action. After expiration of the time to respond to an order to show cause has expired and no response is timely filed, or after the reply of The Florida Bar has been filed, or the time therefore has expired without suchany filing, the supreme court shallwill review the matter and issue an appropriate judgment. SuchThis judgment may include any sanction that a court may impose for contempt and, if the person found in contempt is a member of The Florida Bar, may include any disciplinary sanction authorized under these rules.
      If the supreme court requires factual findings, the supreme court may direct appointment of a referee as elsewhere provided in these rules. Proceedings for contempt referred to a referee shallmust be processed in the same manner as disciplinary proceedings under these rules, including but not limited to the procedures provided thereinin these rules for conditional guilty pleas for consent judgments. If the court determines it necessary to refer a request to terminate, modify, or withhold entry of an order of suspension based on a petition for contempt and order to show cause for noncompliance with a subpoena for trust account records to a referee for receipt of evidence, the referee proceedings shallmust be expedited and conducted in the same manner as proceedings before a referee on a petition to terminate, modify, or withhold an order of emergency suspension, as elsewhere provided in these rules.
      (G) Preparation and Filing of Report of Referee and Record. The referee shallmust prepare and file a report and the record in cases brought under this rule. The procedures provided for in the rule on procedure before a referee elsewhere under these rules shall apply to the preparation, filing, and review of the record herein.
      (H) Appellate Review of Report of Referee. Any party to the contempt proceedings may seek review of the report of referee in the manner provided in these rules onfor appellate review of disciplinary proceedings under these rules.
    (2) Failure to Respond to Official Bar Inquiries.
      (A) Petition for Contempt and Order to Show Cause. When a respondent is found in contempt by a disciplinary agency for failure to respond to an official bar inquiry without good cause shown, bar counsel shallmust file a petition for contempt and order to show cause with the Supreme Court of Florida.
      (B) Response to Petition for Contempt and Order to Show Cause. The respondent shallwill have 10 days from the date of filing of a petition authorized by this subdivision in which to file a response.
      (C) Supreme Court Action.
          (i) Entry of Suspension Order. After a response has been filed, or the time for a response has expired, and unless otherwise ordered by the court, an order shall be entered suspending the respondent for failure to respond to an official bar inquiry until further order of the court.The court will enter an order suspending the respondent for failure to respond to an official bar inquiry after the respondent files a response to the order to show cause or the time for filing a response has expired, unless the court orders otherwise.
          (ii) Assignment to Referee. If the supreme court requires factual findings, the supreme court may direct appointment of a referee as elsewhere provided in these rules. Proceedings for contempt referred to a referee shallmust be processed in the same manner as disciplinary proceedings under these rules, including but not limited to the provisions provided for conditional guilty pleas for consent judgments.
(g) Court Reporters. Court reporters who are employees of The Florida Bar may be appointed to report any disciplinary proceeding. If the respondent objects at least 48 hours in advance of the matter to be recorded, an independent contract reporter may be retained. Reasonable costs for independent court reporter service shallwill be taxed to athe respondent for payment to The Florida Bar.
(h) Disqualification as Trier and AttorneyLawyer for Respondent Due to Conflict.
    (1) Grievance Committee Members, Members of the Board of Governors, and Employees of The Florida Bar. No grievance committee member, member of the board of governors, or employee of The Florida Bar shallmay represent a party other than The Florida Bar in disciplinary proceedings authorized under these rules.
    (2) Former Grievance Committee Members, Former Board Members, and Former Employees. No former member of a grievance committee, former member of the board of governors, or former employee of The Florida Bar shallmay represent any party other than The Florida Bar in disciplinary proceedings authorized under these rules if personally involved to any degree in the matter while a member of the grievance committee, the board of governors, or while an employee of The Florida Bar.
    A former member of the board of governors, former member of any grievance committee, or former employee of The Florida Bar who did not participate personally in any way in the investigation or prosecution of the matter or in any related matter in which the attorneylawyer seeks to be a representative, and who did not serve in a supervisory capacity over suchthe investigation or prosecution, shallmay not represent any party except The Florida Bar for 1 year after suchthis service without the express consent of the board.
    (3) Partners, Associates, Employers, or Employees of the Firms of Grievance Committee Members or Board of Governors Members Precluded From Representing Parties Other Than The Florida Bar. Members of the firms of grievance committee members or board members shallmay not represent any party other than The Florida Bar in disciplinary proceedings authorized under these rules without the express consent of the board.
    (4) Partners, Associates, Employers, or Employees of the Firms of Former Grievance Committee Members or Former Board of Governors Members Precluded From Representing Parties Other Than The Florida Bar. AttorneysLawyers in the firms of former board members or former grievance committee members shallmay not represent any party other than The Florida Bar in disciplinary proceedings authorized under these rules for 1 year after the former member’s service without the express consent of the board.
(i) Proceedings after Disbarment. The respondent may consent to or the court may order further proceedings after disbarment, which may include: an audit of trust, operating, or personal bank accounts, the cost of which may be assessed as provided elsewhere in these rules; a requirement forthat the respondent to provide a financial affidavit attesting to personal and business finances; and maintenance of a current mailing address for a stated period of time.
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Chapter 4 Rules of Professional Conduct
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Preamble
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Preamble – A Lawyer’s Responsibilities
A lawyer, as a member of the legal profession, is a representative of clients, an officer of the legal system, and a public citizen having special responsibility for the quality of justice.
As a representative of clients, a lawyer performs various functions. As an adviser, a lawyer provides a client with an informed understanding of the client’s legal rights and obligations and explains their practical implications. As an advocate, a lawyer zealously asserts the client’s position under the rules of the adversary system. As a negotiator, a lawyer seeks a result advantageous to the client but consistent with requirements of honest dealing with others. As an evaluator, a lawyer acts by examining a client’s legal affairs and reporting about them to the client or to others.
In addition to these representational functions, a lawyer may serve as a third-party neutral, a nonrepresentational role helping the parties to resolve a dispute or other matter. Some of these rules apply directly to lawyers who are or have served as third-party neutrals. See, e.g., rules 4-1.12 and 4-2.4. In addition, there are rules that apply to lawyers who are not active in the practice of law or to practicing lawyers even when they are acting in a nonprofessional capacity. For example, a lawyer who commits fraud in the conduct of a business is subject to discipline for engaging in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation. See rule 4-8.4.
In all professional functions a lawyer should be competent, prompt, and diligent. A lawyer should maintain communication with a client concerning the representation. A lawyer should keep in confidence information relating to representation of a client except so far as disclosure is required or permitted by the Rules of Professional Conduct or by law.
A lawyer’s conduct should conform to the requirements of the law, both in professional service to clients and in the lawyer’s business and personal affairs. A lawyer should use the law’s procedures only for legitimate purposes and not to harass or intimidate others. A lawyer should demonstrate respect for the legal system and for those who serve it, including judges, other lawyers, and public officials. While it is a lawyer’s duty, when necessary, to challenge the rectitude of official action, it is also a lawyer’s duty to uphold legal process.
As a public citizen, a lawyer should seek improvement of the law, access to the legal system, the administration of justice, and the quality of service rendered by the legal profession. As a member of a learned profession, a lawyer should cultivate knowledge of the law beyond its use for clients, employ that knowledge in reform of the law, and work to strengthen legal education. In addition, a lawyer should further the public’s understanding of and confidence in the rule of law and the justice system, because legal institutions in a constitutional democracy depend on popular participation and support to maintain their authority. A lawyer should be mindful of deficiencies in the administration of justice and of the fact that the poor, and sometimes persons who are not poor, cannot afford adequate legal assistance. Therefore, all lawyers should devote professional time and resources and use civic influence to ensure equal access to our system of justice for all those who because of economic or social barriers cannot afford or secure adequate legal counsel. A lawyer should aid the legal profession in pursuing these objectives and should help the bar regulate itself in the public interest.
Many of the lawyer’s professional responsibilities are prescribed in the Rules of Professional Conduct and in substantive and procedural law. A lawyer is also guided by personal conscience and the approbation of professional peers. A lawyer should strive to attain the highest level of skill, to improve the law and the legal profession, and to exemplify the legal profession’s ideals of public service.
A lawyer’s responsibilities as a representative of clients, an officer of the legal system, and a public citizen are usually harmonious. Zealous advocacy is not inconsistent with justice. Moreover, unless violations of law or injury to another or another’s property is involved, preserving client confidences ordinarily serves the public interest because people are more likely to seek legal advice, and thereby heed their legal obligations, when they know their communications will be private.
In the practice of law, conflicting responsibilities are often encountered. Difficult ethical problems may arise from a conflict between a lawyer’s responsibility to a client and the lawyer’s own sense of personal honor, including obligations to society and the legal profession. The Rules of Professional Conduct often prescribe terms for resolving suchthese conflicts. Within the framework of these rules, however, many difficult issues of professional discretion can arise. SuchThese issues must be resolved through the exercise of sensitive professional and moral judgment guided by the basic principles underlying the rules. These principles include the lawyer’s obligation to protect and pursue a client’s legitimate interests, within the bounds of the law, while maintaining a professional, courteous, and civil attitude toward all persons involved in the legal system.
Lawyers are officers of the court and they are responsible to the judiciary for the propriety of their professional activities. Within that context, the legal profession has been granted powers of self-government. Self-regulation helps maintain the legal profession’s independence from undue government domination. An independent legal profession is an important force in preserving government under law, for abuse of legal authority is more readily challenged by a profession whose members are not dependent on the executive and legislative branches of government for the right to practice. Supervision by an independent judiciary, and conformity with the rules the judiciary adopts for the profession, assures both independence and responsibility.
Thus, every lawyer is responsible for observance of the Rules of Professional Conduct. A lawyer should also aid in securing their observance by other lawyers. Neglect of these responsibilities compromises the independence of the profession and the public interest that it serves.

Scope:

The Rules of Professional Conduct are rules of reason. They should be interpreted with reference to the purposes of legal representation and of the law itself. Some of the rules are imperatives, cast in the terms of “shallmust,or shallmust not., or “may not.” These define proper conduct for purposes of professional discipline. Others, generally cast in the term “may,” are permissive and define areas under the rules in which the lawyer has discretion to exercise professional judgment. No disciplinary action should be taken when the lawyer chooses not to act or acts within the bounds of suchthat discretion. Other rules define the nature of relationships between the lawyer and others. The rules are thus partly obligatory and disciplinary and partly constitutive and descriptive in that they define a lawyer’s professional role.
The comment accompanying each rule explains and illustrates the meaning and purpose of the rule. The comments are intended only as guides to interpretation, whereas the text of each rule is authoritative. Thus, comments, even when they use the term “should,” do not add obligations to the rules but merely provide guidance for practicing in compliance with the rules.
The rules presuppose a larger legal context shaping the lawyer’s role. That context includes court rules and statutes relating to matters of licensure, laws defining specific obligations of lawyers, and substantive and procedural law in general. Compliance with the rules, as with all law in an open society, depends primarily upon understanding and voluntary compliance, secondarily upon reinforcement by peer and public opinion, and finally, when necessary, upon enforcement through disciplinary proceedings. The rules do not, however, exhaust the moral and ethical considerations that should inform a lawyer, for no worthwhile human activity can be completely defined by legal rules. The rules simply provide a framework for the ethical practice of law. The comments are sometimes used to alert lawyers to their responsibilities under other law.
Furthermore, for purposes of determining the lawyer’s authority and responsibility, principles of substantive law external to these rules determine whether a client-lawyer relationship exists. Most of the duties flowing from the client-lawyer relationship attach only after the client has requested the lawyer to render legal services and the lawyer has agreed to do so. But there are some duties, such as that offor example confidentiality under rule 4-1.6, which attach when the lawyer agrees to consider whether a client-lawyer relationship shallwill be established. See rule 4-1.18. Whether a client-lawyer relationship exists for any specific purpose can depend on the circumstances and may be a question of fact.
Failure to comply with an obligation or prohibition imposed by a rule is a basis for invoking the disciplinary process. The rules presuppose that disciplinary assessment of a lawyer’s conduct will be made on the basis of the facts and circumstances as they existed at the time of the conduct in question in recognition of the fact that a lawyer often has to act upon uncertain or incomplete evidence of the situation. Moreover, the rules presuppose that whether discipline should be imposed for a violation, and the severity of a sanction, depend on all the circumstances, such as the willfulness and seriousness of the violation, extenuating factors, and whether there have been previous violations.
Violation of a rule should not itself give rise to a cause of action against a lawyer nor should it create any presumption in such a case that a legal duty has been breached. In addition, violation of a rule does not necessarily warrant any other nondisciplinary remedy, such as disqualification of a lawyer in pending litigation. The rules are designed to provide guidance to lawyers and to provide a structure for regulating conduct through disciplinary agencies. They are not designed to be a basis for civil liability. Furthermore, the purpose of the rules can be subverted when they are invoked by opposing parties as procedural weapons. The fact that a rule is a just basis for a lawyer’s self-assessment, or for sanctioning a lawyer under the administration of a disciplinary authority, does not imply that an antagonist in a collateral proceeding or transaction has standing to seek enforcement of the rule. Accordingly, nothing in the rules should be deemed to augment any substantive legal duty of lawyers or the extra-disciplinary consequences of violating sucha substantive legal duty. Nevertheless, since the rules do establish standards of conduct by lawyers, a lawyer’s violation of a rule may be evidence of a breach of the applicable standard of conduct.

Terminology:

“Belief” or “believes” denotes that the person involved actually supposed the fact in question to be true. A person’s belief may be inferred from circumstances.
“Consult” or “consultation” denotes communication of information reasonably sufficient to permit the client to appreciate the significance of the matter in question.
“Confirmed in writing,” when used in reference to the informed consent of a person, denotes informed consent that is given in writing by the person or a writing that a lawyer promptly transmits to the person confirming an oral informed consent. See “informed consent” below. If it is not feasible to obtain or transmit the writing at the time the person gives informed consent, then the lawyer must obtain or transmit it within a reasonable timethereafter.
“Firm” or “law firm” denotes a lawyer or lawyers in a law partnership, professional corporation, sole proprietorship, or other association authorized to practice law; or lawyers employed in the legal department of a corporation or other organization.
“Fraud” or “fraudulent” denotes conduct having a purpose to deceive and not merely negligent misrepresentation or failure to apprise another of relevant information.
“Informed consent” denotes the agreement by a person to a proposed course of conduct after the lawyer has communicated adequate information and explanation about the material risks of and reasonably available alternatives to the proposed course of conduct.
“Knowingly,” “known,” or “knows” denotes actual knowledge of the fact in question. A person’s knowledge may be inferred from circumstances.
“Lawyer” denotes a person who is a member of The Florida Bar or otherwise authorized to practice in any court of the State of Florida.
“Partner” denotes a member of a partnership and a shareholder in a law firm organized as a professional corporation, or a member of an association authorized to practice law.
“Reasonable” or “reasonably” when used in relation to conduct by a lawyer denotes the conduct of a reasonably prudent and competent lawyer.
“Reasonable belief” or “reasonably believes” when used in reference to a lawyer denotes that the lawyer believes the matter in question and that the circumstances are such that the belief is reasonable.
“Reasonably should know” when used in reference to a lawyer denotes that a lawyer of reasonable prudence and competence would ascertain the matter in question.
“Screened” denotes the isolation of a lawyer from any participation in a matter through the timely imposition of procedures within a firm that are reasonably adequate under the circumstances to protect information that the isolated lawyer is obligated to protect under these rules or other law.
“Substantial” when used in reference to degree or extent denotes a material matter of clear and weighty importance.
“Tribunal” denotes a court, an arbitrator in a binding arbitration proceeding, or a legislative body, administrative agency, or other body acting in an adjudicative capacity. A legislative body, administrative agency, or other body acts in an adjudicative capacity when a neutral official, after the presentation of evidence or legal argument by a party or parties, will render a binding legal judgment directly affecting a party’s interests in a particular matter.
“Writing” or “written” denotes a tangible or electronic record of a communication or representation, including handwriting, typewriting, printing, photostating, photography, audio or video recording, and e-mailelectronic communications. A “signed” writing includes an electronic sound, symbol or process attached to or logically associated with a writing and executed or adopted by a person with the intent to sign the writing.


Comment

Confirmed in writing

If it is not feasible to obtain or transmit a written confirmation at the time the client gives informed consent, then the lawyer must obtain or transmit it within a reasonable time thereafter. If a lawyer has obtained a client’s informed consent, the lawyer may act in reliance on that consent so long as it is confirmed in writing within a reasonable time thereafter.

Firm

Whether 2 or more lawyers constitute a firm above can depend on the specific facts. For example, 2 practitioners who share office space and occasionally consult or assist each other ordinarily would not be regarded as constituting a firm. However, if they present themselves to the public in a way that suggests that they are a firm or conduct themselves as a firm, they should be regarded as a firm for purposes of the rules. The terms of any formal agreement between associated lawyers are relevant in determining whether they are a firm, as is the fact that they have mutual access to information concerning the clients they serve. Furthermore, it is relevant in doubtful cases to consider the underlying purpose of the rule that is involved. A group of lawyers could be regarded as a firm for purposes of the rule that the same lawyer should not represent opposing parties in litigation, while it might not be so regarded for purposes of the rule that information acquired by 1 lawyer is attributed to another.
With respect to the law department of an organization, including the government, there is ordinarily no question that the members of the department constitute a firm within the meaning of the Rules of Professional Conduct. There can be uncertainty, however, as to the identity of the client. For example, it may not be clear whether the law department of a corporation represents a subsidiary or an affiliated corporation, as well as the corporation by which the members of the department are directly employed. A similar question can arise concerning an unincorporated association and its local affiliates.
Similar questions can also arise with respect to lawyers in legal aid and legal services organizations. Depending upon the structure of the organization, the entire organization or different components of it may constitute a firm or firms for purposes of these rules.

Fraud

When used in these rules, the terms “fraud” or “fraudulent” refer to conduct that has a purpose to deceive. This does not include merely negligent misrepresentation or negligent failure to apprise another of relevant information. For purposes of these rules, it is not necessary that anyone has suffered damages or relied on the misrepresentation or failure to inform.

Informed consent

Many of the Rules of Professional Conduct require the lawyer to obtain the informed consent of a client or other person (e.g., a former client or, under certain circumstances, a prospective client) before accepting or continuing representation or pursuing a course of conduct. See, e.g., rules 4-1.2(c), 4-1.6(a), 4-1.7(b), and 4-1.18. The communication necessary to obtain such consent will vary according to the rule involved and the circumstances giving rise to the need to obtain informed consent. The lawyer must make reasonable efforts to ensure that the client or other person possesses information reasonably adequate to make an informed decision. Ordinarily, this will require communication that includes a disclosure of the facts and circumstances giving rise to the situation, any explanation reasonably necessary to inform the client or other person of the material advantages and disadvantages of the proposed course of conduct and a discussion of the client’s or other person’s options and alternatives. In some circumstances it may be appropriate for a lawyer to advise a client or other person to seek the advice of other counsel. A lawyer need not inform a client or other person of facts or implications already known to the client or other person; nevertheless, a lawyer who does not personally inform the client or other person assumes the risk that the client or other person is inadequately informed and the consent is invalid. In determining whether the information and explanation provided are reasonably adequate, relevant factors include whether the client or other person is experienced in legal matters generally and in making decisions of the type involved, and whether the client or other person is independently represented by other counsel in giving the consent. Normally, suchthese persons need less information and explanation than others, and generally a client or other person who is independently represented by other counsel in giving the consent should be assumed to have given informed consent.
Obtaining informed consent will usually require an affirmative response by the client or other person. In general, a lawyer may not assume consent from a client’s or other person’s silence. Consent may be inferred, however, from the conduct of a client or other person who has reasonably adequate information about the matter. A number of rules state that a person’s consent be confirmed in writing. See, e.g., rule 4-1.7(b). For a definition of “writing” and “confirmed in writing,” see terminology above. Other rules require that a client’s consent be obtained in a writing signed by the client. See, e.g., rule 4-1.8(a). For a definition of “signed,” see terminology above.

Screened

This definition applies to situations where screening of a personally disqualified lawyer is permitted to remove imputation of a conflict of interest under rules 4-1.11, 4-1.12, or 4-1.18.
The purpose of screening is to assure the affected parties that confidential information known by the personally disqualified lawyer remains protected. The personally disqualified lawyer should acknowledge the obligation not to communicate with any of the other lawyers in the firm with respect to the matter. Similarly, other lawyers in the firm who are working on the matter should be informed that the screening is in place and that they may not communicate with the personally disqualified lawyer with respect to the matter. Additional screening measures that are appropriate for the particular matter will depend on the circumstances. To implement, reinforce, and remind all affected lawyers of the presence of the screening, it may be appropriate for the firm to undertake suchthese procedures as a written undertaking by the screened lawyer to avoid any communication with other firm personnel and any contact with any firm files or other materialsinformation, including information in electronic form, relating to the matter, written notice and instructions to all other firm personnel forbidding any communication with the screened lawyer relating to the matter, denial of access by the screened lawyer to firm files or other materialsinformation, including information in electronic form, relating to the matter, and periodic reminders of the screen to the screened lawyer and all other firm personnel.
In order to be effective, screening measures must be implemented as soon as practicable after a lawyer or law firm knows or reasonably should know that there is a need for screening.
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4-1 Client-Lawyer Relationship
RULE 4-1.4 COMMUNICATION
(a) Informing Client of Status of Representation. A lawyer shall:

    (1) promptly inform the client of any decision or circumstance with respect to which the client’s informed consent, as defined in terminology, is required by these rules;
    (2) reasonably consult with the client about the means by which the client’s objectives are to be accomplished;
    (3) keep the client reasonably informed about the status of the matter;
    (4) promptly comply with reasonable requests for information; and
    (5) consult with the client about any relevant limitation on the lawyer’s conduct when the lawyer knows or reasonably should know that the client expects assistance not permitted by the Rules of Professional Conduct or other law.
(b) Duty to Explain Matters to Client. A lawyer shall explain a matter to the extent reasonably necessary to permit the client to make informed decisions regarding the representation.

Comment

Reasonable communication between the lawyer and the client is necessary for the client to effectively participate in the representation.

Communicating with client

If these rules require that a particular decision about the representation be made by the client, subdivision (a)(1) requires that the lawyer promptly consult with and secure the client’s consent prior to taking action unless prior discussions with the client have resolved what action the client wants the lawyer to take. For example, a lawyer who receives from opposing counsel an offer of settlement in a civil controversy or a proffered plea bargain in a criminal case must promptly inform the client of its substance unless the client has previously indicated that the proposal will be acceptable or unacceptable or has authorized the lawyer to accept or to reject the offer. See rule 4-1.2(a).
Subdivision (a)(2) requires the lawyer to reasonably consult with the client about the means to be used to accomplish the client’s objectives. In some situations – depending on both the importance of the action under consideration and the feasibility of consulting with the client – this duty will require consultation prior to taking action. In other circumstances, such as during a trial when an immediate decision must be made, the exigency of the situation may require the lawyer to act without prior consultation. In such cases the lawyer must nonetheless act reasonably to inform the client of actions the lawyer has taken on the client’s behalf. Additionally, subdivision (a)(3) requires that the lawyer keep the client reasonably informed about the status of the matter, such as significant developments affecting the timing or the substance of the representation.
A lawyer’s regular communication with clients will minimize the occasions on which a client will need to request information concerning the representation. When a client makes a reasonable request for information, however, subdivision (a)(4) requires prompt compliance with the request, or if a prompt response is not feasible, that the lawyer, or a member of the lawyer’s staff, acknowledge receipt of the request and advise the client when a response may be expected.
Lawyers have particular responsibilities in communicating with clients regarding changes in firm composition. See Rule 4-5.8.

Explaining matters

The client should have sufficient information to participate intelligently in decisions concerning the objectives of the representation and the means by which they are to be pursued, to the extent the client is willing and able to do so.
Adequacy of communication depends in part on the kind of advice or assistance that is involved. For example, when there is time to explain a proposal made in a negotiation, the lawyer should review all important provisions with the client before proceeding to an agreement. In litigation a lawyer should explain the general strategy and prospects of success and ordinarily should consult the client on tactics that are likely to result in significant expense or to injure or coerce others. On the other hand, a lawyer ordinarily will not be expected to describe trial or negotiation strategy in detail. The guiding principle is that the lawyer should fulfill reasonable client expectations for information consistent with the duty to act in the client’s best interests and the client’s overall requirements as to the character of representation. In certain circumstances, such as when a lawyer asks a client to consent to a representation affected by a conflict of interest, the client must give informed consent, as defined in terminology.
Ordinarily, the information to be provided is that appropriate for a client who is a comprehending and responsible adult. However, fully informing the client according to this standard may be impracticable, for example, where the client is a child or suffers from mental disability. See rule 4-1.14. When the client is an organization or group, it is often impossible or inappropriate to inform every one of its members about its legal affairs; ordinarily, the lawyer should address communications to the appropriate officials of the organization. See rule 4-1.13. Where many routine matters are involved, a system of limited or occasional reporting may be arranged with the client.

Withholding information

In some circumstances, a lawyer may be justified in delaying transmission of information when the client would be likely to react imprudently to an immediate communication. Thus, a lawyer might withhold a psychiatric diagnosis of a client when the examining psychiatrist indicates that disclosure would harm the client. A lawyer may not withhold information to serve the lawyer’s own interest or convenience or the interests or convenience of another person. Rules or court orders governing litigation may provide that information supplied to a lawyer may not be disclosed to the client. Rule 4-3.4(c) directs compliance with such rules or orders.
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RULE 4-1.5 FEES AND COSTS FOR LEGAL SERVICES
(a) Illegal, Prohibited, or Clearly Excessive Fees and Costs. An attorney shall not enter into an agreement for, charge, or collect an illegal, prohibited, or clearly excessive fee or cost, or a fee generated by employment that was obtained through advertising or solicitation not in compliance with the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar. A fee or cost is clearly excessive when:

    (1) after a review of the facts, a lawyer of ordinary prudence would be left with a definite and firm conviction that the fee or the cost exceeds a reasonable fee or cost for services provided to such a degree as to constitute clear overreaching or an unconscionable demand by the attorney; or
    (2) the fee or cost is sought or secured by the attorney by means of intentional misrepresentation or fraud upon the client, a nonclient party, or any court, as to either entitlement to, or amount of, the fee.
(b) Factors to Be Considered in Determining Reasonable Fees and Costs.
    (1) Factors to be considered as guides in determining a reasonable fee include:
      (A) the time and labor required, the novelty, complexity, and difficulty of the questions involved, and the skill requisite to perform the legal service properly;
      (B) the likelihood that the acceptance of the particular employment will preclude other employment by the lawyer;
      (C) the fee, or rate of fee, customarily charged in the locality for legal services of a comparable or similar nature;
      (D) the significance of, or amount involved in, the subject matter of the representation, the responsibility involved in the representation, and the results obtained;
      (E) the time limitations imposed by the client or by the circumstances and, as between attorney and client, any additional or special time demands or requests of the attorney by the client;
      (F) the nature and length of the professional relationship with the client;
      (G) the experience, reputation, diligence, and ability of the lawyer or lawyers performing the service and the skill, expertise, or efficiency of effort reflected in the actual providing of such services; and
      (H) whether the fee is fixed or contingent, and, if fixed as to amount or rate, then whether the client’s ability to pay rested to any significant degree on the outcome of the representation.
    (2) Factors to be considered as guides in determining reasonable costs include:
      (A) the nature and extent of the disclosure made to the client about the costs;
      (B) whether a specific agreement exists between the lawyer and client as to the costs a client is expected to pay and how a cost is calculated that is charged to a client;
      (C) the actual amount charged by third party providers of services to the attorney;
      (D) whether specific costs can be identified and allocated to an individual client or a reasonable basis exists to estimate the costs charged;
      (E) the reasonable charges for providing in-house service to a client if the cost is an in-house charge for services; and
      (F) the relationship and past course of conduct between the lawyer and the client.
All costs are subject to the test of reasonableness set forth in subdivision (a) above. When the parties have a written contract in which the method is established for charging costs, the costs charged thereunder shall be presumed reasonable.
(c) Consideration of All Factors. [no change]
(d) Enforceability of Fee Contracts. [no change]
(e) Duty to Communicate Basis or Rate of Fee or Costs to Client and Definitions.
    (1) Duty to Communicate. When the lawyer has not regularly represented the client, the basis or rate of the fee and costs shall be communicated to the client, preferably in writing, before or within a reasonable time after commencing the representation. A fee for legal services that is nonrefundable in any part shall be confirmed in writing and shall explain the intent of the parties as to the nature and amount of the nonrefundable fee. The test of reasonableness found in subdivision (b), above, applies to all fees for legal services without regard to their characterization by the parties.
    The fact that a contract may not be in accord with these rules is an issue between the attorney and client and a matter of professional ethics, but is not the proper basis for an action or defense by an opposing party when fee-shifting litigation is involved.
    (2) Definitions.
      (A) Retainer. A retainer is a sum of money paid to a lawyer to guarantee the lawyer’s future availability. A retainer is not payment for past legal services and is not payment for future services.
      (B) Flat Fee. A flat fee is a sum of money paid to a lawyer for all legal services to be provided in the representation. A flat fee may be termed “non-refundable.”
      (C) Advance Fee. An advanced fee is a sum of money paid to the lawyer against which the lawyer will bill the client as legal services are provided.
(f) Contingent Fees. As to contingent fees:
    (1) [no change]
    (2) [no change]
    (3) [no change]
    (4) A lawyer who enters into an arrangement for, charges, or collects any fee in an action or claim for personal injury or for property damages or for death or loss of services resulting from personal injuries based upon tortious conduct of another, including products liability claims, whereby the compensation is to be dependent or contingent in whole or in part upon the successful prosecution or settlement thereof shall do so only under the following requirements:
      (A) [no change]
      (B) [no change]
      (C) [no change]
      (D) [no change]
      (E) The lawyer must provide ordinary lien and subrogation resolution services as part of the primary personal injury or wrongful death matter. The lawyer handling the primary personal injury or wrongful death matter may not charge additional fees for providing any lien and subrogation resolution services if those fees, when combined with the lawyer’s fees for handling the primary claim, would exceed the contingent fee schedule set forth in this subdivision. A lawyer who is not handling the primary personal injury or wrongful death matter may charge fees for extraordinary lien and subrogation resolution services that, when combined with the fees for the primary personal injury or wrongful death matter, exceed the fee schedule set forth in this rule only if the services are in the client’s best interests and only after obtaining the client’s written informed consent to the fees. Any fees charged by the lawyer involved in the extraordinary lien and subrogation resolution services must separately comply with the provisions of this rule. The lawyer representing the client solely in the extraordinary lien and subrogation resolution services may not divide fees for those services with the lawyer representing the client in the primary matter.
(g) Division of Fees Between Lawyers in Different Firms. [no change]
(h) Credit Plans. [no change]
(i) Arbitration Clauses. [no change]

STATEMENT OF CLIENT’S RIGHTSFOR CONTINGENCY FEES

[no change]

Comment

Bases or rate of fees and costs

When the lawyer has regularly represented a client, they ordinarily will have evolved an understanding concerning the basis or rate of the fee. The conduct of the lawyer and client in prior relationships is relevant when analyzing the requirements of this rule. In a new client-lawyer relationship, however, an understanding as to the fee should be promptly established. It is not necessary to recite all the factors that underlie the basis of the fee but only those that are directly involved in its computation. It is sufficient, for example, to state the basic rate is an hourly charge or a fixed amount or an estimated amount, or to identify the factors that may be taken into account in finally fixing the fee. Although hourly billing or a fixed fee may be the most common bases for computing fees in an area of practice, these may not be the only bases for computing fees. A lawyer should, where appropriate, discuss alternative billing methods with the client. When developments occur during the representation that render an earlier estimate substantially inaccurate, a revised estimate should be provided to the client. A written statement concerning the fee reduces the possibility of misunderstanding. Furnishing the client with a simple memorandum or a copy of the lawyer’s customary fee schedule is sufficient if the basis or rate of the fee is set forth.
General overhead should be accounted for in a lawyer’s fee, whether the lawyer charges hourly, flat, or contingent fees. Filing fees, transcription, and the like should be charged to the client at the actual amount paid by the lawyer. A lawyer may agree with the client to charge a reasonable amount for in-house costs or services. In-house costs include items such as copying, faxing, long distance telephone, and computerized research. In-house services include paralegal services, investigative services, accounting services, and courier services. The lawyer should sufficiently communicate with the client regarding the costs charged to the client so that the client understands the amount of costs being charged or the method for calculation of those costs. Costs appearing in sufficient detail on closing statements and approved by the parties to the transaction should meet the requirements of this rule.
Rule 4-1.8(e) should be consulted regarding a lawyer’s providing financial assistance to a client in connection with litigation.
Lawyers should also be mindful of any statutory, constitutional, or other requirements or restrictions on attorneys’ fees.
In order to avoid misunderstandings concerning the nature of legal fees, written documentation is required when any aspect of the fee is nonrefundable. A written contract provides a method to resolve misunderstandings and to protect the lawyer in the event of continued misunderstanding. Rule 4-1.5 (e) does not require the client to sign a written document memorializing the terms of the fee. A letter from the lawyer to the client setting forth the basis or rate of the fee and the intent of the parties in regard to the nonrefundable nature of the fee is sufficient to meet the requirements of this rule.
All legal fees and contracts for legal fees are subject to the requirements of the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar. In particular, the test for reasonableness of legal fees found in rule 4-1.5(b) applies to all types of legal fees and contracts related to them.

Terms of payment

A lawyer may require advance payment of a fee but is obliged to return any unearned portion. See rule 4-1.16(d). A lawyer is not, however, required to return retainers that, pursuant to an agreement with a client, are not refundable. A nonrefundable retainer or nonrefundable flat fee is the property of the lawyer and should not be held in trust. If a client gives the lawyer a negotiable instrument that represents both an advance on costs plus either a nonrefundable retainer or a nonrefundable flat fee, the entire amount should be deposited into the lawyer’s trust account, then the portion representing the earned nonrefundable retainer or nonrefundable flat fee should be withdrawn within a reasonable time. An advance fee must be held in trust until it is earned. Nonrefundable fees are, as all fees, subject to the prohibition against excessive fees.
A lawyer may accept property in payment for services, such as an ownership interest in an enterprise, providing this does not involve acquisition of a proprietary interest in the cause of action or subject matter of the litigation contrary to rule 4-1.8(i). However, a fee paid in property instead of money may be subject to special scrutiny because it involves questions concerning both the value of the services and the lawyer’s special knowledge of the value of the property.
An agreement may not be made whose terms might induce the lawyer improperly to curtail services for the client or perform them in a way contrary to the client’s interest. For example, a lawyer should not enter into an agreement whereby services are to be provided only up to a stated amount when it is foreseeable that more extensive services probably will be required, unless the situation is adequately explained to the client. Otherwise, the client might have to bargain for further assistance in the midst of a proceeding or transaction. However, it is proper to define the extent of services in light of the client’s ability to pay. A lawyer should not exploit a fee arrangement based primarily on hourly charges by using wasteful procedures. When there is doubt whether a contingent fee is consistent with the client’s best interest, the lawyer should offer the client alternative bases for the fee and explain their implications. Applicable law may impose limitations on contingent fees, such as a ceiling on the percentage.

Prohibited contingent fees

Subdivision (f)(3)(A) prohibits a lawyer from charging a contingent fee in a domestic relations matter when payment is contingent upon the securing of a divorce or upon the amount of alimony or support or property settlement to be obtained. This provision does not preclude a contract for a contingent fee for legal representation in connection with the recovery of post-judgment balances due under support, alimony, or other financial orders because such contracts do not implicate the same policy concerns.
Contingent fees are prohibited in criminal and certain domestic relations matters. In domestic relations cases, fees that include a bonus provision or additional fee to be determined at a later time and based on results obtained have been held to be impermissible contingency fees and therefore subject to restitution and disciplinary sanction as elsewhere stated in these Rules Regulating The Florida Bar.

Contingent fee regulation

Subdivision (e) is intended to clarify that whether the lawyer’s fee contract complies with these rules is a matter between the lawyer and client and an issue for professional disciplinary enforcement. The rules and subdivision (e) are not intended to be used as procedural weapons or defenses by others. Allowing opposing parties to assert noncompliance with these rules as a defense, including whether the fee is fixed or contingent, allows for potential inequity if the opposing party is allowed to escape responsibility for their actions solely through application of these rules.
Rule 4-1.5(f)(4) should not be construed to apply to actions or claims seeking property or other damages arising in the commercial litigation context.
Rule 4-1.5(f)(4)(B) is intended to apply only to contingent aspects of fee agreements. In the situation where a lawyer and client enter a contract for part noncontingent and part contingent attorney’s fees, rule 4-1.5(f)(4)(B) should not be construed to apply to and prohibit or limit the noncontingent portion of the fee agreement. An attorney could properly charge and retain the noncontingent portion of the fee even if the matter was not successfully prosecuted or if the noncontingent portion of the fee exceeded the schedule set forth in rule 4-1.5(f)(4)(B). Rule 4-1.5(f)(4)(B) should, however, be construed to apply to any additional contingent portion of such a contract when considered together with earned noncontingent fees. Thus, under such a contract a lawyer may demand or collect only such additional contingent fees as would not cause the total fees to exceed the schedule set forth in rule 4-1.5(f)(4)(B).
The limitations in rule 4-1.5(f)(4)(B)(i)c. are only to be applied in the case where all the defendants admit liability at the time they file their initial answer and the trial is only on the issue of the amount or extent of the loss or the extent of injury suffered by the client. If the trial involves not only the issue of damages but also such questions as proximate cause, affirmative defenses, seat belt defense, or other similar matters, the limitations are not to be applied because of the contingent nature of the case being left for resolution by the trier of fact.
Rule 4-1.5(f)(4)(B)(ii) provides the limitations set forth in subdivision (f)(4)(B)(i) may be waived by the client upon approval by the appropriate judge. This waiver provision may not be used to authorize a lawyer to charge a client a fee that would exceed rule 4-1.5(a) or (b). It is contemplated that this waiver provision will not be necessary except where the client wants to retain a particular lawyer to represent the client or the case involves complex, difficult, or novel questions of law or fact that would justify a contingent fee greater than the schedule but not a contingent fee that would exceed rule 4-1.5(b).
Upon a petition by a client, the trial court reviewing the waiver request must grant that request if the trial court finds the client: (a) understands the right to have the limitations in rule 4-1.5(f)(4)(B) applied in the specific matter; and (b) understands and approves the terms of the proposed contract. The consideration by the trial court of the waiver petition is not to be used as an opportunity for the court to inquire into the merits or details of the particular action or claim that is the subject of the contract.
The proceedings before the trial court and the trial court’s decision on a waiver request are to be confidential and not subject to discovery by any of the parties to the action or by any other individual or entity except The Florida Bar. However, terms of the contract approved by the trial court may be subject to discovery if the contract (without court approval) was subject to discovery under applicable case law or rules of evidence.
Rule 4-1.5 (f) (4) (B) (iii) is added to acknowledge the provisions of Article 1, Section 26 of the Florida Constitution, and to create an affirmative obligation on the part of an attorney contemplating a contingency fee contract to notify a potential client with a medical liability claim of the limitations provided in that constitutional provision. This addition to the rule is adopted prior to any judicial interpretation of the meaning or scope of the constitutional provision and this rule is not intended to make any substantive interpretation of the meaning or scope of that provision. The rule also provides that a client who wishes to waive the rights of the constitutional provision, as those rights may relate to attorney’s fees, must do so in the form contained in the rule.
Rule 4-1.5(f)(4)(E) addresses the resolution of medical liens and subrogation claims that are directly related to the underlying personal injury or wrongful death case. This subdivision requires that the lawyer undertaking the personal injury or wrongful death case provide ordinary lien and subrogation resolution services as part of the underlying matter at no additional charge to the client. As part of every personal injury and wrongful death case, the lawyer handling the matter has an obligation under the fee contract to make reasonable efforts to ascertain the existence of any medical liens and subrogation claims, advise the client of their existence, make reasonable efforts to negotiate liens that are negotiable, and disburse the amounts to lien holders as agreed by the client and the third party and under the trust accounting rules. A lawyer is not obligated to file or defend a separate proceeding to resolve medical liens or subrogation claims as part of the lawyer’s original agreement to represent the client in the personal injury or wrongful death matter. Additionally, some medical liens or subrogation claims are so complex that they cannot be resolved through standard negotiation that is normally undertaken by the lawyer handling the personal injury or wrongful death case and extraordinary lien and subrogation resolution services may be necessary to maximize the client’s net recovery. In such cases, the client’s best interests may best be served by having the lien and subrogation matters resolved by another with significant experience in this field. Therefore, when reasonable efforts to negotiate such medical liens or subrogation claims fail, the lawyer may, with the client’s written informed consent, either refer the client to a third party or hire a third party on behalf of the client to handle the lien and subrogation resolution who may charge a separate fee or cost to the client. If a lawyer provides the extraordinary lien and subrogation services, that lawyer’s contract with the client must separately comply with all provisions of rule 4-1.5. The original lawyer handling the personal injury matter may not receive any additional fees for providing extraordinary lien and subrogation resolution services, as additional fees would result in an excessive fee to the original lawyer and likely would exceed the contingent fee schedule. If the additional services are to be provided by another, the lawyer should first determine whether the services constitute the practice of law and, if so, should not refer those services to someone not authorized to provide the services. A lawyer’s duties when a third party claims an interest in funds held by the lawyer are addressed in subdivision (f) and the comment of rule 5-1.1.
Rule 4-1.5(f)(6) prohibits a lawyer from charging the contingent fee percentage on the total, future value of a recovery being paid on a structured or periodic basis. This prohibition does not apply if the lawyer’s fee is being paid over the same length of time as the schedule of payments to the client.
Contingent fees are prohibited in criminal and certain domestic relations matters. In domestic relations cases, fees that include a bonus provision or additional fee to be determined at a later time and based on results obtained have been held to be impermissible contingency fees and therefore subject to restitution and disciplinary sanction as elsewhere stated in these Rules Regulating The Florida Bar.
Fees that provide for a bonus or additional fees and that otherwise are not prohibited under the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar can be effective tools for structuring fees. For example, a fee contract calling for a flat fee and the payment of a bonus based on the amount of property retained or recovered in a general civil action is not prohibited by these rules. However, the bonus or additional fee must be stated clearly in amount or formula for calculation of the fee (basis or rate). Courts have held that unilateral bonus fees are unenforceable. The test of reasonableness and other requirements of this rule apply to permissible bonus fees.

Division of fee

A division of fee is a single billing to a client covering the fee of 2 or more lawyers who are not in the same firm. A division of fee facilitates association of more than 1 lawyer in a matter in which neither alone could serve the client as well, and most often is used when the fee is contingent and the division is between a referring lawyer and a trial specialist. Subject to the provisions of subdivision (f)(4)(D), subdivision (g) permits the lawyers to divide a fee on either the basis of the proportion of services they render or by agreement between the participating lawyers if all assume responsibility for the representation as a whole and the client is advised and does not object. It does require disclosure to the client of the share that each lawyer is to receive. Joint responsibility for the representation entails the obligations stated in rule 4-5.1 for purposes of the matter involved.

Disputes over fees

Since the fee arbitration rule (chapter 14) has been established by the bar to provide a procedure for resolution of fee disputes, the lawyer should conscientiously consider submitting to it. Where law prescribes a procedure for determining a lawyer’s fee, for example, in representation of an executor or administrator, a class, or a person entitled to a reasonable fee as part of the measure of damages, the lawyer entitled to such a fee and a lawyer representing another party concerned with the fee should comply with the prescribed procedure.

Referral fees and practices

A secondary lawyer shall not be entitled to a fee greater than the limitation set forth in rule 4-1.5(f)(4)(D)(ii) merely because the lawyer agrees to do some or all of the following: (a) consults with the client; (b) answers interrogatories; (c) attends depositions; (d) reviews pleadings; (e) attends the trial; or (f) assumes joint legal responsibility to the client. However, the provisions do not contemplate that a secondary lawyer who does more than the above is necessarily entitled to a larger percentage of the fee than that allowed by the limitation.
The provisions of rule 4-1.5(f)(4)(D)(iii) only apply where the participating lawyers have for purposes of the specific case established a co-counsel relationship. The need for court approval of a referral fee arrangement under rule 4-1.5(f)(4)(D)(iii) should only occur in a small percentage of cases arising under rule 4-1.5(f)(4) and usually occurs prior to the commencement of litigation or at the onset of the representation. However, in those cases in which litigation has been commenced or the representation has already begun, approval of the fee division should be sought within a reasonable period of time after the need for court approval of the fee division arises.
In determining if a co-counsel relationship exists, the court should look to see if the lawyers have established a special partnership agreement for the purpose of the specific case or matter. If such an agreement does exist, it must provide for a sharing of services or responsibility and the fee division is based upon a division of the services to be rendered or the responsibility assumed. It is contemplated that a co-counsel situation would exist where a division of responsibility is based upon, but not limited to, the following: (a) based upon geographic considerations, the lawyers agree to divide the legal work, responsibility, and representation in a convenient fashion. Such a situation would occur when different aspects of a case must be handled in different locations; (b) where the lawyers agree to divide the legal work and representation based upon their particular expertise in the substantive areas of law involved in the litigation; or (c) where the lawyers agree to divide the legal work and representation along established lines of division, such as liability and damages, causation and damages, or other similar factors.
The trial court’s responsibility when reviewing an application for authorization of a fee division under rule 4-1.5(f)(4)(D)(iii) is to determine if a co-counsel relationship exists in that particular case. If the court determines a co-counsel relationship exists and authorizes the fee division requested, the court does not have any responsibility to review or approve the specific amount of the fee division agreed upon by the lawyers and the client.
Rule 4-1.5(f)(4)(D)(iv) applies to the situation where appellate counsel is retained during the trial of the case to assist with the appeal of the case. The percentages set forth in subdivision (f)(4)(D) are to be applicable after appellate counsel’s fee is established. However, the effect should not be to impose an unreasonable fee on the client.

Credit Plans

Credit plans include credit cards. If a lawyer accepts payment from a credit plan for an advance of fees and costs, the amount must be held in trust in accordance with chapter 5, Rules Regulating The Florida Bar, and the lawyer must add the lawyer’s own money to the trust account in an amount equal to the amount charged by the credit plan for doing business with the credit plan.
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RULE 4-1.6 CONFIDENTIALITY OF INFORMATION
(a) Consent Required to Reveal Information. A lawyer must not reveal information relating to representation of a client except as stated in subdivisions (b), (c), and (d), unless the client gives informed consent.
(b) When Lawyer Must Reveal Information. A lawyer must reveal suchconfidential information to the extent the lawyer reasonably believes necessary:

    (1) to prevent a client from committing a crime; or
    (2) to prevent a death or substantial bodily harm to another.
(c) When Lawyer May Reveal Information. A lawyer may reveal suchconfidential information to the extent the lawyer reasonably believes necessary:
    (1) to serve the client’s interest unless it is information the client specifically requires not to be disclosed;
    (2) to establish a claim or defense on behalf of the lawyer in a controversy between the lawyer and client;
    (3) to establish a defense to a criminal charge or civil claim against the lawyer based upon conduct in which the client was involved;
    (4) to respond to allegations in any proceeding concerning the lawyer’s representation of the client; or
    (5) to comply with the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar; or
    (6) to detect and resolve conflicts of interest between lawyers in different firms arising from the lawyer’s change of employment or from changes in the composition or ownership of a firm, but only if the revealed information would not compromise the attorney-client privilege or otherwise prejudice the client.
(d) Exhaustion of Appellate Remedies. When required by a tribunal to reveal suchconfidential information, a lawyer may first exhaust all appellate remedies.
(e) Inadvertent Disclosure of Information. A lawyer must make reasonable efforts to prevent the inadvertent or unauthorized disclosure of, or unauthorized access to, information relating to the representation of a client.
(ef) Limitation on Amount of Disclosure. When disclosure is mandated or permitted, the lawyer must disclose no more information than is required to meet the requirements or accomplish the purposes of this rule.

Comment

The lawyer is part of a judicial system charged with upholding the law. One of the lawyer’s functions is to advise clients so that they avoid any violation of the law in the proper exercise of their rights.
This rule governs the disclosure by a lawyer of information relating to the representation of a client during the lawyer’s representation of the client. See rule 4-1.18 for the lawyer’s duties with respect to information provided to the lawyer by a prospective client, rule 4-1.9(c) for the lawyer’s duty not to reveal information relating to the lawyer’s prior representation of a former client, and rules 4-1.8(b) and 4-1.9(b) for the lawyer’s duties with respect to the use of suchconfidential information to the disadvantage of clients and former clients.
A fundamental principle in the client-lawyer relationship is that, in the absence of the client’s informed consent, the lawyer must not reveal information relating to the representation. See terminology for the definition of informed consent. This contributes to the trust that is the hallmark of the client-lawyer relationship. The client is thereby encouraged to seek legal assistance and to communicate fully and frankly with the lawyer even as to embarrassing or legally damaging subject matter. The lawyer needs this information to represent the client effectively and, if necessary, to advise the client to refrain from wrongful conduct. Almost without exception, clients come to lawyers in order to determine their rights and what is, in the complex of laws and regulations, deemed to be legal and correct. Based upon experience, lawyers know that almost all clients follow the advice given, and the law is upheld.
The principle of confidentiality is given effect in 2 related bodies of law, the attorney-client privilege (which includes the work product doctrine) in the law of evidence and the rule of confidentiality established in professional ethics. The attorney-client privilege applies in judicial and other proceedings in which a lawyer may be called as a witness or otherwise required to produce evidence concerning a client. The rule of client-lawyer confidentiality applies in situations other than those where evidence is sought from the lawyer through compulsion of law. The confidentiality rule applies not merely to matters communicated in confidence by the client but also to all information relating to the representation, whatever its source. A lawyer may not disclose suchconfidential information except as authorized or required by the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar or by law. However, none of the foregoing limits the requirement of disclosure in subdivision (b). This disclosure is required to prevent a lawyer from becoming an unwitting accomplice in the fraudulent acts of a client. See also Scope.
The requirement of maintaining confidentiality of information relating to representation applies to government lawyers who may disagree with the policy goals that their representation is designed to advance.

Authorized disclosure

A lawyer is impliedly authorized to make disclosures about a client when appropriate in carrying out the representation, except to the extent that the client’s instructions or special circumstances limit that authority. In litigation, for example, a lawyer may disclose information by admitting a fact that cannot properly be disputed or in negotiation by making a disclosure that facilitates a satisfactory conclusion.
Lawyers in a firm may, in the course of the firm’s practice, disclose to each other information relating to a client of the firm, unless the client has instructed that particular information be confined to specified lawyers.

Disclosure adverse to client

The confidentiality rule is subject to limited exceptions. In becoming privy to information about a client, a lawyer may foresee that the client intends serious harm to another person. However, to the extent a lawyer is required or permitted to disclose a client’s purposes, the client will be inhibited from revealing facts that would enable the lawyer to counsel against a wrongful course of action. While the public may be protected if full and open communication by the client is encouraged, several situations must be distinguished.
First, the lawyer may not counsel or assist a client in conduct that is criminal or fraudulent. See rule 4-1.2(d). Similarly, a lawyer has a duty under rule 4-3.3(a)(4) not to use false evidence. This duty is essentially a special instance of the duty prescribed in rule 4-1.2(d) to avoid assisting a client in criminal or fraudulent conduct.
Second, the lawyer may have been innocently involved in past conduct by the client that was criminal or fraudulent. In such athis situation the lawyer has not violated rule 4-1.2(d), because to "counsel or assist" criminal or fraudulent conduct requires knowing that the conduct is of that character.
Third, the lawyer may learn that a client intends prospective conduct that is criminal. As stated in subdivision (b)(1), the lawyer must reveal information in order to prevent suchthese consequences. It is admittedly difficult for a lawyer to "know" when the criminal intent will actually be carried out, for the client may have a change of mind.
Subdivision (b)(2) contemplates past acts on the part of a client that may result in present or future consequences that may be avoided by disclosure of otherwise confidential communications. Rule 4-1.6(b)(2) would now require the lawyer to disclose information reasonably necessary to prevent the future death or substantial bodily harm to another, even though the act of the client has been completed.
The lawyer’s exercise of discretion requires consideration of such factors as the nature of the lawyer’s relationship with the client and with those who might be injured by the client, the lawyer’s own involvement in the transaction, and factors that may extenuate the conduct in question. Where practical the lawyer should seek to persuade the client to take suitable action. In any case, a disclosure adverse to the client’s interest should be no greater than the lawyer reasonably believes necessary to the purpose.

Withdrawal

If the lawyer’s services will be used by the client in materially furthering a course of criminal or fraudulent conduct, the lawyer must withdraw, as stated in rule 4-1.16(a)(1).
After withdrawal the lawyer is required to refrain from making disclosure of the client’s confidences, except as otherwise provided in rule 4-1.6. Neither this rule nor rule 4-1.8(b) nor rule 4-1.16(d) prevents the lawyer from giving notice of the fact of withdrawal, and the lawyer may also withdraw or disaffirm any opinion, document, affirmation, or the like.
Where the client is an organization, the lawyer may be in doubt whether contemplated conduct will actually be carried out by the organization. Where necessary to guide conduct in connection with the rule, the lawyer may make inquiry within the organization as indicated in rule 4-1.13(b).

Dispute concerning lawyer’s conduct

A lawyer’s confidentiality obligations do not preclude a lawyer from securing confidential legal advice about the lawyer’s personal responsibility to comply with these rules. In most situations, disclosing information to secure suchthis advice will be impliedly authorized for the lawyer to carry out the representation. Even when the disclosure is not impliedly authorized, subdivision (c)(5) permits suchthis disclosure because of the importance of a lawyer’s compliance with the Rules of Professional Conduct.
Where a legal claim or disciplinary charge alleges complicity of the lawyer in a client’s conduct or other misconduct of the lawyer involving representation of the client, the lawyer may respond to the extent the lawyer reasonably believes necessary to establish a defense. The same is true with respect to a claim involving the conduct or representation of a former client. The lawyer’s right to respond arises when an assertion of such complicity has been made. Subdivision (c) does not require the lawyer to await the commencement of an action or proceeding that charges such complicity, so that the defense may be established by responding directly to a third party who has made such anthe assertion. The right to defend, of course, applies where a proceeding has been commenced. Where practicable and not prejudicial to the lawyer’s ability to establish the defense, the lawyer should advise the client of the third party’s assertion and request that the client respond appropriately. In any event, disclosure should be no greater than the lawyer reasonably believes is necessary to vindicate innocence, the disclosure should be made in a manner that limits access to the information to the tribunal or other persons having a need to know it, and appropriate protective orders or other arrangements should be sought by the lawyer to the fullest extent practicable.
If the lawyer is charged with wrongdoing in which the client’s conduct is implicated, the rule of confidentiality should not prevent the lawyer from defending against the charge. Such aA charge can arise in a civil, criminal, or professional disciplinary proceeding and can be based on a wrong allegedly committed by the lawyer against the client or on a wrong alleged by a third person; for example, a person claiming to have been defrauded by the lawyer and client acting together. A lawyer entitled to a fee is permitted by subdivision (c) to prove the services rendered in an action to collect it. This aspect of the rule expresses the principle that the beneficiary of a fiduciary relationship may not exploit it to the detriment of the fiduciary. As stated above, the lawyer must make every effort practicable to avoid unnecessary disclosure of information relating to a representation, to limit disclosure to those having the need to know it, and to obtain protective orders or make other arrangements minimizing the risk of disclosure.

Disclosures otherwise required or authorized

The attorney-client privilege is differently defined in various jurisdictions. If a lawyer is called as a witness to give testimony concerning a client, absent waiver by the client, rule 4-1.6(a) requires the lawyer to invoke the privilege when it is applicable. The lawyer must comply with the final orders of a court or other tribunal of competent jurisdiction requiring the lawyer to give information about the client.
The Rules of Professional Conduct in various circumstances permit or require a lawyer to disclose information relating to the representation. See rules 4-2.3, 4-3.3, and 4-4.1. In addition to these provisions, a lawyer may be obligated or permitted by other provisions of law to give information about a client. Whether another provision of law supersedes rule 4-1.6 is a matter of interpretation beyond the scope of these rules, but a presumption should exist against such a supersession.

Detection of Conflicts of Interest

Subdivision (c)(6) recognizes that lawyers in different firms may need to disclose limited information to each other to detect and resolve conflicts of interest, for example, when a lawyer is considering an association with another firm, two or more firms are considering a merger, or a lawyer is considering the purchase of a law practice. See comment to rule 4-1.17. Under these circumstances, lawyers and law firms are permitted to disclose limited information, but only once substantive discussions regarding the new relationship have occurred. Any disclosure should ordinarily include no more than the identity of the persons and entities involved in a matter, a brief summary of the general issues involved, and information about whether the matter has terminated. Even this limited information, however, should be disclosed only to the extent reasonably necessary to detect and resolve conflicts of interest that might arise from the possible new relationship. The disclosure of any information is prohibited if it would compromise the attorney-client privilege or otherwise prejudice the client (e.g., the fact that a corporate client is seeking advice on a corporate takeover that has not been publicly announced; that a person has consulted a lawyer about the possibility of divorce before the person’s intentions are known to the person’s spouse; or that a person has consulted a lawyer about a criminal investigation that has not led to a public charge). Under those circumstances, subdivision (a) prohibits disclosure unless the client or former client gives informed consent. A lawyer’s fiduciary duty to the lawyer’s firm may also govern a lawyer’s conduct when exploring an association with another firm and is beyond the scope of these rules.
Any information disclosed under this subdivision may be used or further disclosed only to the extent necessary to detect and resolve conflicts of interest. This subdivision does not restrict the use of information acquired by means independent of any disclosure under this subdivision. This subdivision also does not affect the disclosure of information within a law firm when the disclosure is otherwise authorized, for example, when a lawyer in a firm discloses information to another lawyer in the same firm to detect and resolve conflicts of interest that could arise in connection with undertaking a new representation.

Acting Competently to Preserve Confidentiality

Paragraph (e) requires a lawyer to act competently to safeguard information relating to the representation of a client against unauthorized access by third parties and against inadvertent or unauthorized disclosure by the lawyer or other persons who are participating in the representation of the client or who are subject to the lawyer’s supervision. See rules 4-1.1, 4-5.1 and 4-5.3. The unauthorized access to, or the inadvertent or unauthorized disclosure of, information relating to the representation of a client does not constitute a violation of paragraph (e) if the lawyer has made reasonable efforts to prevent the access or disclosure. Factors to be considered in determining the reasonableness of the lawyer’s efforts include, but are not limited to, the sensitivity of the information, the likelihood of disclosure if additional safeguards are not employed, the cost of employing additional safeguards, the difficulty of implementing the safeguards, and the extent to which the safeguards adversely affect the lawyer’s ability to represent clients (e.g., by making a device or important piece of software excessively difficult to use). A client may require the lawyer to implement special security measures not required by this rule or may give informed consent to forgo security measures that would otherwise be required by this rule. Whether a lawyer may be required to take additional steps to safeguard a client’s information in order to comply with other law, for example state and federal laws that govern data privacy or that impose notification requirements on the loss of, or unauthorized access to, electronic information, is beyond the scope of these rules. For a lawyer’s duties when sharing information with nonlawyers outside the lawyer’s own firm, see the comment to rule 4-5.3.
When transmitting a communication that includes information relating to the representation of a client, the lawyer must take reasonable precautions to prevent the information from coming into the hands of unintended recipients. This duty, however, does not require that the lawyer use special security measures if the method of communication affords a reasonable expectation of privacy. Special circumstances, however, may warrant special precautions. Factors to be considered in determining the reasonableness of the lawyer’s expectation of confidentiality include the sensitivity of the information and the extent to which the privacy of the communication is protected by law or by a confidentiality agreement. A client may require the lawyer to implement special security measures not required by this rule or may give informed consent to the use of a means of communication that would otherwise be prohibited by this rule. Whether a lawyer may be required to take additional steps in order to comply with other law, for example state and federal laws that govern data privacy, is beyond the scope of these rules.

Former client

The duty of confidentiality continues after the client-lawyer relationship has terminated. See rule 4-1.9 for the prohibition against using such information to the disadvantage of the former client.
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RULE 4-1.17 SALE OF LAW PRACTICE
A lawyer or a law firm may sell or purchase a law practice, or an area of practice, including good will, provided that:
(a) Sale of Practice or Area of Practice as an Entirety. The entire practice, or the entire area of practice, is sold to 1 or more lawyers or law firms authorized to practice law in Florida.
(b) Notice to Clients. Written notice is served by certified mail, return receipt requested, upon each of the seller’s clients of:

    (1) the proposed sale;
    (2) the client’s right to retain other counsel; and
    (3) the fact that the client’s consent to the substitution of counsel will be presumed if the client does not object within 30 days after being served with notice.
(c) Court Approval Required. If a representation involves pending litigation, there shallwill be no substitution of counsel or termination of representation unless authorized by the court. The seller may disclose, in camera, to the court information relating to the representation only to the extent necessary to obtain an order authorizing the substitution of counsel or termination of representation.
(d) Client Objections. If a client objects to the proposed substitution of counsel, the seller shallmust comply with the requirements of rule 4-1.16(d).
(e) Consummation of Sale. A sale of a law practice shallmay not be consummated until:
    (1) with respect to clients of the seller who were served with written notice of the proposed sale, the 30-day period referred to in subdivision (b)(3) has expired or all suchthese clients have consented to the substitution of counsel or termination of representation; and
    (2) court orders have been entered authorizing substitution of counsel for all clients who could not be served with written notice of the proposed sale and whose representations involve pending litigation; provided, in the event the court fails to grant a substitution of counsel in a matter involving pending litigation, that matter shallmay not be included in the sale and the sale otherwise shallwill be unaffected. Further, the matters not involving pending litigation of any client who cannot be served with written notice of the proposed sale shallmay not be included in the sale and the sale otherwise shallwill be unaffected.
(f) Existing Fee Contracts Controlling. The purchaser shallmust honor the fee agreements that were entered into between the seller and the seller’s clients. The fees charged clients shallmay not be increased by reason of the sale.

Comment

The practice of law is a profession, not merely a business. Clients are not commodities that can be purchased and sold at will. In accordance with the requirements of this rule, when a lawyer or an entire firm sells the practice and other lawyers or firms take over the representation, the selling lawyer or firm may obtain compensation for the reasonable value of the practice as may withdrawing partners of law firms. See rules 4-5.4 and 4-5.6.
The requirement that all of the private practice, or all of an area of practice, be sold is satisfied if the seller in good faith makes the entire practice, or area of practice, available for sale to the purchasers. The fact that a number of the seller’s clients decide not to be represented by the purchasers but take their matters elsewhere, therefore, does not result in a violation. Similarly, a violation does not occur merely because a court declines to approve the substitution of counsel in the cases of a number of clients who could not be served with written notice of the proposed sale.

Sale of entire practice or entire area of practice

The rule requires that the seller’s entire practice, or an area of practice, be sold. The prohibition against sale of less than an entire practice area protects those clients whose matters are less lucrative and who might find it difficult to secure other counsel if a sale could be limited to substantial fee-generating matters. The purchasers are required to undertake all client matters in the practice, or practice area, subject to client consent or court authorization. This requirement is satisfied, however, even if a purchaser is unable to undertake a particular client matter because of a conflict of interest.

Client confidences, consent, and notice

Negotiations between seller and prospective purchaser prior to disclosure of information relating to a specific representation of an identifiable client do not violate the confidentiality provisions of rule 4-1.6 any more than do preliminary discussions concerning the possible association of another lawyer or mergers between firms, with respect to which client consent ordinarily is not required. See rule 4-1.6(c)(6). Providing the prospective purchaser access to client-specificdetailed information relating to the representation, for example, and to the file, however, requires client consent or court authorization. See rule 4-1.6. Rule 4-1.17 provides that the seller must attempt to serve each client with written notice of the contemplated sale, including the identity of the purchaser and the fact that the decision to consent to the substitution of counsel or to make other arrangements must be made within 30 days. If nothing is heard within that time from a client who was served with written notice of the proposed sale, that client’s consent to the substitution of counsel is presumed. However, with regard to clients whose matters involve pending litigation but who could not be served with written notice of the proposed sale, authorization of the court is required before the files and client-specific information relating to the representation of those clients may be disclosed by the seller to the purchaser and before counsel may be substituted.
A lawyer or law firm selling a practice cannot be required to remain in practice just because some clients cannot be served with written notice of the proposed sale. Because these clients cannot themselves consent to the substitution of counsel or direct any other disposition of their representations and files, with regard to clients whose matters involve pending litigation the rule requires an order from the court authorizing the substitution (or withdrawal) of counsel. The court can be expected to determine whether reasonable efforts to locate the client have been exhausted, and whether the absent client’s legitimate interests will be served by authorizing the substitution of counsel so that the purchaser may continue the representation. Preservation of client confidences requires that the petition for a court order be considered in camera. If, however, the court fails to grant substitution of counsel in a matter involving pending litigation, that matter shallmay not be included in the sale and the sale may be consummated without inclusion of that matter.
The rule provides that matters not involving pending litigation of clients who could not be served with written notice may not be included in the sale. This is because the clients’ consent to disclosure of confidential information and to substitution of counsel cannot be obtained and because the alternative of court authorization ordinarily is not available in matters not involving pending litigation. Although suchthese matters shallmay not be included in the sale, the sale may be consummated without inclusion of those matters.
If a client objects to the proposed substitution of counsel, the rule treats the seller as attempting to withdraw from representation of that client and, therefore, provides that the seller must comply with the provisions of rule 4-1.16 concerning withdrawal from representation. Additionally, the seller must comply with applicable requirements of law or rules of procedure.
All the elements of client autonomy, including the client’s absolute right to discharge a lawyer and transfer the representation to another, survive the sale of the practice or an area of practice.

Fee arrangements between client and purchaser

The sale may not be financed by increases in fees charged the clients of the practice. Existing agreements between the seller and the client as to fees and the scope of the work must be honored by the purchaser. This obligation of the purchaser is a factor that can be taken into account by seller and purchaser when negotiating the sale price of the practice.

Other applicable ethical standards

Lawyers participating in the sale of a law practice or a practice area are subject to the ethical standards applicable to involving another lawyer in the representation of a client for all matters pending at the time of the sale. These include, for example, the seller’s ethical obligation to exercise competence in identifying a purchaser qualified to assume the practice and the purchaser’s obligation to undertake the representation competently (see rule 4-1.1); the obligation to avoid disqualifying conflicts, and to secure the client’s informed consent for those conflicts that can be agreed to (see rule 4-1.7 regarding conflicts and see the terminology section of the preamble for the definition of informed consent); and the obligation to protect information relating to the representation (see rules 4-1.6, 4-1.8(b), and 4-1.9(b) and (c)). If the terms of the sale involve the division between purchaser and seller of fees from matters that arise subsequent to the sale, the fee-division provisions of rule 4-1.5 must be satisfied with respect to suchthese fees. These provisions will not apply to the division of fees from matters pending at the time of sale.
If approval of the substitution of the purchasing attorney for the selling attorney is required by the rules of any tribunal in which a matter is pending, such approval must be obtained before the matter can be included in the sale (see rule 4-1.16).

Applicability of this rule

This rule applies, among other situations, to the sale of a law practice by representatives of a lawyer who is deceased, disabled, or has disappeared. It is possible that a nonlawyer, who is not subject to the Rules of Professional Conduct, might be involved in the sale. When the practice of a lawyer who is deceased, is disabled, or has disappeared is being sold, the notice required by subdivision (b) of this rule must be given by someone who is legally authorized to act on the selling lawyer’s behalf, such asfor example, a personal representative or a guardian. This is because the sale of a practice and transfer of representation involve legal rights of the affected clients.
Bona fide admission to, withdrawal from, or retirement from a law partnership or professional association, retirement plans and similar arrangements, and a sale of tangible assets of a law practice, do not constitute a sale or purchase governed by this rule.
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RULE 4-1.18 DUTIES TO PROSPECTIVE CLIENT
(a) Prospective Client. A person who discussesconsults with a lawyer about the possibility of forming a client-lawyer relationship with respect to a matter is a prospective client.
(b) Confidentiality of Information. Even when no client-lawyer relationship ensues, a lawyer who has had discussions withlearned information from a prospective client shallmay not use or reveal that information learned in the consultation, except as rule 4-1.9 would permit with respect to information of a former client.
(c) Subsequent Representation. A lawyer subject to subdivision (b) shallmay not represent a client with interests materially adverse to those of a prospective client in the same or a substantially related matter if the lawyer received information from the prospective client that could be used to the disadvantage of that person in the matter, except as provided in subdivision (d). If a lawyer is disqualified from representation under this rule, no lawyer in a firm with which that lawyer is associated may knowingly undertake or continue representation in such athe matter, except as provided in subdivision (d).
(d) Permissible Representation. When the lawyer has received disqualifying information as defined in subdivision (c), representation is permissible if:

    (1) both the affected client and the prospective client have given informed consent, confirmed in writing; or
    (2) the lawyer who received the information took reasonable measures to avoid exposure to more disqualifying information than was reasonably necessary to determine whether to represent the prospective client; and
      (iA) the disqualified lawyer is timely screened from any participation in the matter and is apportioned no part of the fee therefrom; and
      (iiB) written notice is promptly given to the prospective client.
Comment

Prospective clients, like clients, may disclose information to a lawyer, place documents or other property in the lawyer’s custody, or rely on the lawyer’s advice. A lawyer’s discussionsconsultations with a prospective client usually are limited in time and depth and leave both the prospective client and the lawyer free (and the lawyer sometimes required) to proceed no further. Hence, prospective clients should receive some but not all of the protection afforded clients.
Not all persons who communicate information to a lawyer are entitled to protection under this rule.A person becomes a prospective client by consulting with a lawyer about the possibility of forming a client-lawyer relationship with respect to a matter. Whether communications, including written, oral, or electronic communications, constitute a consultation depends on the circumstances. For example, a consultation is likely to have occurred if a lawyer, either in person or through the lawyer’s advertising in any medium, specifically requests or invites the submission of information about a potential representation without clear and reasonably understandable warnings and cautionary statements that limit the lawyer’s obligations, and a person provides information in response. In contrast, a consultation does not occur if a person provides information to a lawyer in response to advertising that merely describes the lawyer’s education, experience, areas of practice, and contact information, or provides legal information of general interest. A person who communicates information unilaterally to a lawyer, without any reasonable expectation that the lawyer is willing to discuss the possibility of forming a client-lawyer relationship, is not a "prospective client" within the meaning of subdivision (a).
It is often necessary for a prospective client to reveal information to the lawyer during an initial consultation prior to the decision about formation of a client-lawyer relationship. The lawyer often must learn suchthis information to determine whether there is a conflict of interest with an existing client and whether the matter is one that the lawyer is willing to undertake. Subdivision (b) prohibits the lawyer from using or revealing that information, except as permitted by rule 4-1.9, even if the client or lawyer decides not to proceed with the representation. The duty exists regardless of how brief the initial conference may be.
In order to avoid acquiring disqualifying information from a prospective client, a lawyer considering whether to undertake a new matter should limit the initial interviewconsultation to only such information as reasonably appears necessary for that purpose. Where the information indicates that a conflict of interest or other reason for non-representation exists, the lawyer should so inform the prospective client or decline the representation. If the prospective client wishes to retain the lawyer, and if consent is possible under rule 4-1.7, then consent from all affected present or former clients must be obtained before accepting the representation.
A lawyer may condition conversationsa consultation with a prospective client on the person’s informed consent that no information disclosed during the consultation will prohibit the lawyer from representing a different client in the matter. See terminology for the definition of informed consent. If the agreement expressly so provides, the prospective client may also consent to the lawyer’s subsequent use of information received from the prospective client.
Even in the absence of an agreement, under subdivision (c), the lawyer is not prohibited from representing a client with interests adverse to those of the prospective client in the same or a substantially related matter unless the lawyer has received from the prospective client information that could be used to the disadvantage of the prospective client in the matter.
Under subdivision (c), the prohibition in this rule is imputed to other lawyers as provided in rule 4-1.10, but, under subdivision (d)(1), the prohibition and its imputation may be avoided if the lawyer obtains the informed consent, confirmed in writing, of both the prospective and affected clients. In the alternative, the prohibition and its imputation may be avoided if the conditions of subdivision (d)(2) are met and all disqualified lawyers are timely screened and written notice is promptly given to the prospective client. See terminology (requirements for screening procedures). Subdivision (d)(2)(i) does not prohibit the screened lawyer from receiving a salary or partnership share established by prior independent agreement, but that lawyer may not receive compensation directly related to the matter in which the lawyer is disqualified.
Notice, including a general description of the subject matter about which the lawyer was consulted, and of the screening procedures employed, generally should be given as soon as practicable after the need for screening becomes apparent.
The duties under this rule presume that the prospective client consults the lawyer in good faith. A person who consults a lawyer simply with the intent of disqualifying the lawyer from the matter, with no intent of possibly hiring the lawyer, has engaged in a sham and should not be able to invoke this rule to create a disqualification.
For the duty of competence of a lawyer who gives assistance on the merits of a matter to a prospective client, see rule 4-1.1. For a lawyer’s duties when a prospective client entrusts valuables or papers to the lawyer’s care, see chapter 5, Rules Regulating The Florida Bar.
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4-4. Transactions with Persons other than Clients
RULE 4-4.4 RESPECT FOR RIGHTS OF THIRD PERSONS
(a) In representing a client, a lawyer shallmay not use means that have no substantial purpose other than to embarrass, delay, or burden a third person or knowingly use methods of obtaining evidence that violate the legal rights of such a person.
(b) A lawyer who receives a document or electronically stored information relating to the representation of the lawyer’s client and knows or reasonably should know that the document or electronically stored information was inadvertently sent shallmust promptly notify the sender.

Comment

Responsibility to a client requires a lawyer to subordinate the interests of others to those of the client, but that responsibility does not imply that a lawyer may disregard the rights of third persons. It is impractical to catalogue all suchthese rights, but they include legal restrictions on methods of obtaining evidence from third persons and unwarranted intrusions into privileged relationships, such as the client-lawyer relationship.
Subdivision (b) recognizes that lawyers sometimes receive a documents or electronically stored information that werewas mistakenly sent or produced by opposing parties or their lawyers. A document or electronically stored information is inadvertently sent when it is accidentally transmitted, such as when an e-mail or letter is misaddressed or a document or electronically stored information is accidentally included with information that was intentionally transmitted. If a lawyer knows or reasonably should know that such a document or electronically stored information was sent inadvertently, then this rule requires the lawyer to promptly notify the sender in order to permit that person to take protective measures. Whether the lawyer is required to take additional steps, such as returning the original document or electronically stored information, is a matter of law beyond the scope of these rules, as is the question of whether the privileged status of a document or electronically stored information has been waived. Similarly, this rule does not address the legal duties of a lawyer who receives a document that the lawyer knows or reasonably should know may have been wrongfully obtained by the sending person. For purposes of this rule, “document or electronically stored information” includes, in addition to paper documents, e-mail and other forms of electronically stored information, including embedded data (commonly referred to as “metadata”), that is e-mail or other electronic modes of transmission subject to being read or put into readable form. Metadata in electronic documents creates an obligation under this rule only if the receiving lawyer knows or reasonably should know that the metadata was inadvertently sent to the receiving lawyer.
Some lawyers may choose to return a document or delete electronically stored information unread, for example, when the lawyer learns before receiving the document that it was inadvertently sent to the wrong address. Where a lawyer is not required by applicable law to do so, the decision to voluntarily return such athe document or delete electronically stored information is a matter of professional judgment ordinarily reserved to the lawyer. See rules 4-1.2 and 4-1.4.
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4-5. Law Firms and Associations
RULE 4-5.3 RESPONSIBILITIES REGARDING NONLAWYER ASSISTANTS
(a) Use of Titles by Nonlawyer Assistants. A person who uses the title of paralegal, legal assistant, or other similar term when offering or providing services to the public must work for or under the direction or supervision of a lawyer or law firm.
(b) Supervisory Responsibility. With respect to a nonlawyer employed or retained by or associated with a lawyer or an authorized business entity as defined elsewhere in these Rules Regulating The Florida Bar:
    (1) a partner, and a lawyer who individually or together with other lawyers possesses comparable managerial authority in a law firm, shallmust make reasonable efforts to ensure that the firm has in effect measures giving reasonable assurance that the person’s conduct is compatible with the professional obligations of the lawyer;
    (2) a lawyer having direct supervisory authority over the nonlawyer shallmust make reasonable efforts to ensure that the person’s conduct is compatible with the professional obligations of the lawyer; and
    (3) a lawyer shall beis responsible for conduct of such a person that would be a violation of the Rules of Professional Conduct if engaged in by a lawyer if the lawyer:
      (A) the lawyer orders or, with the knowledge of the specific conduct, ratifies the conduct involved; or
      (B) the lawyer is a partner or has comparable managerial authority in the law firm in which the person is employed, or has direct supervisory authority over the person, and knows of the conduct at a time when its consequences can be avoided or mitigated but fails to take reasonable remedial action.
(c) Ultimate Responsibility of Lawyer. Although paralegals or legal assistants may perform the duties delegated to them by the lawyer without the presence or active involvement of the lawyer, the lawyer shallmust review and be responsible for the work product of the paralegals or legal assistants.

Comment

Lawyers generally employ assistants in their practice, including secretaries, investigators, law student interns, and paraprofessionals such as paralegals and legal assistants. Such assistants, whether employees or independent contractors, act for the lawyer in rendition of the lawyer’s professional services. A lawyer must give such assistants appropriate instruction and supervision concerning the ethical aspects of their employment, particularly regarding the obligation not to disclose information relating to representation of the client. The measures employed in supervising nonlawyers should take account of the level of their legal training and the fact that they are not subject to professional discipline. If an activity requires the independent judgment and participation of the lawyer, it cannot be properly delegated to a nonlawyer employee.
Subdivision (b)(1) requires lawyers with managerial authority within a law firm to make reasonable efforts to establish internal policies and procedures designed to provideensure that the firm has in effect measures giving reasonable assurance that nonlawyers in the firm and nonlawyers outside the firm who work on firm matters will act in a way compatible with the Rules of Professional Conductprofessional obligations of the lawyer. See comment to rule 1.1 (retaining lawyers outside the firm) and comment to rule 4-5.1 (responsibilities with respect to lawyers within a firm). Subdivision (b)(2) applies to lawyers who have supervisory authority over the work of a nonlawyernonlawyers within or outside the firm. Subdivision (b)(3) specifies the circumstances in which a lawyer is responsible for conduct of a nonlawyernonlawyers within or outside the firm that would be a violation of the Rules of Professional Conduct if engaged in by a lawyer.
Nothing provided in this rule should be interpreted to mean that a nonlawyer may have any ownership or partnership interest in a law firm, which is prohibited by rule 4-5.4. Additionally, this rule woulddoes not permit a lawyer to accept employment by a nonlawyer or group of nonlawyers, the purpose of which is to provide the supervision required under this rule. SuchThis conduct is prohibited by rules 4-5.4 and 4-5.5.

Nonlawyers Outside the Firm

A lawyer may use nonlawyers outside the firm to assist the lawyer in rendering legal services to the client. Examples include the retention of an investigative or paraprofessional service, hiring a document management company to create and maintain a database for complex litigation, sending client documents to a third party for printing or scanning, and using an Internet-based service to store client information. When using these services outside the firm, a lawyer must make reasonable efforts to ensure that the services are provided in a manner that is compatible with the lawyer’s professional obligations. The extent of this obligation will depend on the circumstances, including the education, experience and reputation of the nonlawyer; the nature of the services involved; the terms of any arrangements concerning the protection of client information; and the legal and ethical environments of the jurisdictions in which the services will be performed, particularly with regard to confidentiality. See also rules 4-1.1 (competence), 4-1.2 (allocation of authority), 4-1.4 (communication with client), 4-1.6 (confidentiality), 4-5.4 (professional independence of the lawyer), and 4-5.5 (unauthorized practice of law). When retaining or directing a nonlawyer outside the firm, a lawyer should communicate directions appropriate under the circumstances to give reasonable assurance that the nonlawyer’s conduct is compatible with the professional obligations of the lawyer.
Where the client directs the selection of a particular nonlawyer service provider outside the firm, the lawyer ordinarily should agree with the client concerning the allocation of responsibility for monitoring as between the client and the lawyer. See Rule 1.2. When making this allocation in a matter pending before a tribunal, lawyers and parties may have additional obligations that are a matter of law beyond the scope of these rules.
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RULE 4-5.5 UNLICENSED PRACTICE OF LAW; MULTIJURISDICTIONAL PRACTICE OF LAW
(a) Practice of Law. A lawyer shallmay not practice law in a jurisdiction other than the lawyer’s home state, in violation of the regulation of the legal profession in that jurisdiction, or in violation of the regulation of the legal profession in the lawyer’s home state or assist another in doing so.
(b) Prohibited Conduct. A lawyer who is not admitted to practice in Florida shallmay not:

    (1) except as authorized by other law, establish an office or other regular presence in Florida for the practice of law;
    (2) hold out to the public or otherwise represent that the lawyer is admitted to practice law in Florida; or
    (3) appear in court, before an administrative agency, or before any other tribunal unless authorized to do so by the court, administrative agency, or tribunal pursuant to the applicable rules of the court, administrative agency, or tribunal.
(c) Authorized Temporary Practice by Lawyer Admitted in Another United States Jurisdiction. A lawyer admitted and authorized to practice law in another United States jurisdiction who has been neither disbarred or suspended from practice in any jurisdiction, nor disciplined or held in contempt in Florida by reason of misconduct committed while engaged in the practice of law permitted pursuant to this rule, may provide legal services on a temporary basis in Florida that are:
    (1) are undertaken in association with a lawyer who is admitted to practice in Florida and who actively participates in the matter; or
    (2) are in or reasonably related to a pending or potential proceeding before a tribunal in this or another jurisdiction, if the lawyer is authorized by law or order to appear in suchthe proceeding or reasonably expects to be so authorized; or
    (3) are in or reasonably related to a pending or potential arbitration, mediation, or other alternative dispute resolution proceeding in this or another jurisdiction, and the services are not services for which the forum requires pro hac vice admission:
      (A) if the services are performed for a client who resides in or has an office in the lawyer’s home state, or
      (B) where the services arise out of or are reasonably related to the lawyer’s practice in a jurisdiction in which the lawyer is admitted to practice; or
      (4) are not within subdivisions (c)(2) or (c)(3), and
      (A) are performed for a client who resides in or has an office in the jurisdiction in which the lawyer is authorized to practice, or
      (B) arise out of or are reasonably related to the lawyer’s practice in a jurisdiction in which the lawyer is admitted to practice.
(d) Authorized Temporary Practice by Lawyer Admitted in a Non-United States Jurisdiction. A lawyer who is admitted only in a non-United States jurisdiction who is a member in good standing of a recognized legal profession in a foreign jurisdiction whose members are admitted to practice as lawyers or counselors at law or the equivalent and are subject to effective regulation and discipline by a duly constituted professional body or a public authority, and who has been neither disbarred or suspended from practice in any jurisdiction nor disciplined or held in contempt in Florida by reason of misconduct committed while engaged in the practice of law permitted pursuant to this rule does not engage in the unlicensed practice of law in Florida when on a temporary basis the lawyer performs services in Florida that are:
    (1) are undertaken in association with a lawyer who is admitted to practice in Florida and who actively participates in the matter; or
    (2) are in or reasonably related to a pending or potential proceeding before a tribunal held or to be held in a jurisdiction outside the United States if the lawyer, or a person the lawyer is assisting, is authorized by law or by order of the tribunal to appear in suchthe proceeding or reasonably expects to be so authorized; or
    (3) are in or reasonably related to a pending or potential arbitration, mediation, or other alternative dispute resolution proceeding held or to be held in Florida or another jurisdiction and the services are not services for which the forum requires pro hac vice admission
      (A) if the services are performed for a client who resides in or has an office in the jurisdiction in which the lawyer is admitted to practice, or
      (B) where the services arise out of or are reasonably related to the lawyer’s practice in a jurisdiction in which the lawyer is admitted to practice; or
      (4) are not within subdivisions (d)(2) or (d)(3), and
      (A) are performed for a client who resides or has an office in a jurisdiction in which the lawyer is authorized to practice to the extent of that authorization, or
      (B) arise out of or are reasonably related to a matter that has a substantial connection to a jurisdiction in which the lawyer is authorized to practice to the extent of that authorization; or
    (5) are governed primarily by international law or the law of a non-United States jurisdiction in which the lawyer is a member.
Comment

Subdivision (a) applies to unlicensed practice of law by a lawyer, whether through the lawyer’s direct action or by the lawyer assisting another person. A lawyer may practice law only in a jurisdiction in which the lawyer is authorized to practice. A lawyer may be admitted to practice law in a jurisdiction on a regular basis or may be authorized by court rule or order or by law to practice for a limited purpose or on a restricted basis. Regardless of whether the lawyer is admitted to practice law on a regular basis or is practicing as the result of an authorization granted by court rule or order or by the law, the lawyer must comply with the standards of ethical and professional conduct set forth in these Rules Regulating the Florida Bar.
The definition of the practice of law is established by law and varies from one jurisdiction to another. Whatever the definition, limiting the practice of law to members of the bar protects the public against rendition of legal services by unqualified persons. This rule does not prohibit a lawyer from employing the services of paraprofessionals and delegating functions to them, so long as the lawyer supervises the delegated work and retains responsibility for their work. See rule 4-5.3. Likewise, it does not prohibit lawyers from providing professional advice and instruction to nonlawyers whose employment requires knowledge of law; for example, claims adjusters, employees of financial or commercial institutions, social workers, accountants, and persons employed in government agencies. In addition, a lawyer may counsel nonlawyers who wish to proceed pro se.
Other than as authorized by law, a lawyer who is not admitted to practice in Florida violates subdivision (b) if the lawyer establishes an office or other regular presence in Florida for the practice of law. This prohibition includes establishing an office or other regular presence in Florida for the practice of the law of the state where the lawyer is admitted to practice. For example, a lawyer licensed to practice law in New York could not establish an office or regular presence in Florida to practice New York law. Such activity would constitute the unlicensed practice of law. However, for purposes of this rule, a lawyer licensed in another jurisdiction who is in Florida for vacation or for a limited period of time, may provide services to their clients in the jurisdiction where admitted as this does not constitute a regular presence. Presence may be regular even if the lawyer is not physically present here. Such aThe lawyer must not hold out to the public or otherwise represent that the lawyer is admitted to practice law in Florida. Presence may be regular even if the lawyer is not physically present here.
Subdivision (b) also prohibits a lawyer who is not admitted to practice in Florida from appearing in a Florida court, before an administrative agency, or before any other tribunal in Florida unless the lawyer has been granted permission to do so. In order to be granted the permission, the lawyer must follow the applicable rules of the court, agency, or tribunal including, without limitation, the Florida Rules of Judicial Administration governing appearance by foreign attorneyslawyers. While admission by the Florida court or administrative agency for the particular case authorizes the lawyer’s appearance in the matter, it does not act as authorization to allow the establishment of an office in Florida for the practice of law. Therefore, a lawyer licensed in another jurisdiction admitted in a case in Florida may not establish an office in Florida while the case is pending and the lawyer is working on the case.
There are occasions in which a lawyer admitted and authorized to practice in another United States jurisdiction or in a non-United States jurisdiction may provide legal services on a temporary basis in Florida under circumstances that do not create an unreasonable risk to the interests of his or her clients, the public, or the courts. Subdivisions (c) and (d) identify suchthese circumstances. As discussed with regard to subdivision (b) above, Tthis rule does not authorize a lawyer to establish an office or other regular presence in Florida without being admitted to practice generally here. Furthermore, no lawyer is authorized to provide legal services pursuant to this rule if the lawyer is disbarred or suspended from practice in any jurisdiction or has been disciplined or held in contempt in Florida by reason of misconduct committed while engaged in the practice of law permitted pursuant to this rule. The contempt must be final and not reversed or abated.
There is no single test to determine whether a lawyer’s services are provided on a “temporary basis” in Florida and may therefore be permissible under subdivision (c). Services may be “temporary” even though the lawyer provides services in Florida on a recurring basis or for an extended period of time, as when the lawyer is representing a client in a single lengthy negotiation or litigation.
Subdivision (c) applies to lawyers who are admitted to practice law in any United States jurisdiction, which includes the District of Columbia and any state, territory, or commonwealth of the United States. The word "admitted" in subdivision (c) contemplates that the lawyer is authorized to practice in the jurisdiction in which the lawyer is admitted and excludes a lawyer who while technically admitted is not authorized to practice because, for example, the lawyer is on inactive status. Subdivision (d) applies to lawyers who are admitted to practice law in a non-United States jurisdiction if the lawyer is a member in good standing of a recognized legal profession in a foreign jurisdiction, the members of which are admitted to practice as lawyers or counselors at law or the equivalent and subject to effective regulation and discipline by a duly constituted professional body or a public authority. Due to the similarities between the subsections, they will be discussed together. Differences will be noted.
Subdivisions (c)(1)and (d)(1) recognize that the interests of clients and the public are protected if a lawyer admitted only in another jurisdiction associates with a lawyer licensed to practice in Florida. For these subdivisions to apply, the lawyer admitted to practice in Florida could not serve merely as a conduit for the out-of-state lawyer, but would have to share actual responsibility for the representation and actively participate in the representation. To the extent that a court rule or other law of Florida requires a lawyer who is not admitted to practice in Florida to obtain admission pro hac vice prior to appearing in court or before a tribunal or to obtain admission pursuant to applicable rule(s) prior to appearing before an administrative agency, this rule requires the lawyer to obtain that authority.
Lawyers not admitted to practice generally in Florida may be authorized by law or order of a tribunal or an administrative agency to appear before the tribunal or agency. This authority may be granted pursuant to formal rules governing admission pro hac vice or pursuant to formal rules of the agency. Under subdivision (c)(2), a lawyer does not violate this rule when the lawyer appears before a tribunal or agency pursuant to suchthis authority. As with subdivisions (c)(1) and (d)(1), to the extent that a court rule or other law of Florida requires a lawyer who is not admitted to practice in Florida to obtain admission pro hac vice prior to appearing in court or before a tribunal or to obtain admission pursuant to applicable rule(s) prior to appearing before an administrative agency, this rule requires the lawyer to obtain that authority.
Subdivision (c)(2) also provides that a lawyer rendering services in Florida on a temporary basis does not violate this rule when the lawyer engages in conduct in anticipation of a proceeding or hearing in a jurisdiction in which the lawyer is authorized to practice law or in which the lawyer reasonably expects to be admitted pro hac vice. Examples of suchthis conduct include meetings with the client, interviews of potential witnesses, and the review of documents. Similarly, a lawyer admitted only in another jurisdiction may engage in conduct temporarily in Florida in connection with pending litigation in another jurisdiction in which the lawyer is or reasonably expects to be authorized to appear, including taking depositions in Florida.
Subdivision (d)(2) is similar to subdivision (c)(2), however, the authorization in (d)(2) only applies to pending or potential proceedings before a tribunal to be held outside of the United States.
Subdivisions (c)(3) and (d)(3) permit a lawyer admitted to practice law in another jurisdiction to perform services on a temporary basis in Florida if those services are in or reasonably related to a pending or potential arbitration, mediation, or other alternative dispute resolution proceeding in this or another jurisdiction, if the services are performed for a client who resides in or has an office in the lawyer’s home state, or if the services arise out of or are reasonably related to the lawyer’s practice in a jurisdiction in which the lawyer is admitted to practice. The lawyer, however, must obtain admission pro hac vice in the case of a court-annexed arbitration or mediation if court rules or law so require. The lawyer must file a verified statement with The Florida Bar in arbitration proceedings as required by rule 1-3.11 unless the lawyer is appearing in an international arbitration as defined in the comment to that rule. A verified statement is not required if the lawyer first obtained the court’s permission to appear pro hac vice and the court has retained jurisdiction over the matter. For the purposes of this rule, a lawyer who is not admitted to practice law in Florida who files more than 3 demands for arbitration or responses to arbitration in separate arbitration proceedings in a 365-day period shall beis presumed to be providing legal services on a regular, not temporary, basis; however, this presumption shalldoes not apply to a lawyer appearing in international arbitrations as defined in the comment to rule 1-3.11.
Subdivision (c)(4) permits a lawyer admitted in another jurisdiction to provide certain legal services on a temporary basis in Florida that are performed for a client who resides or has an office in the jurisdiction in which the lawyer is authorized to practice or arise out of or are reasonably related to the lawyer’s practice in a jurisdiction in which the lawyer is admitted but are not within subdivisions (c)(2) or (c)(3). These services include both legal services and services that nonlawyers may perform but that are considered the practice of law when performed by lawyers. When performing services which may be performed by nonlawyers, the lawyer remains subject to the Rules of Professional Conduct.
Subdivisions (c)(3), (d)(3), and (c)(4) require that the services arise out of or be reasonably related to the lawyer’s practice in a jurisdiction in which the lawyer is admitted. A variety of factors evidence such athis relationship. The lawyer’s client may have been previously represented by the lawyer, or may be resident in or have substantial contacts with the jurisdiction in which the lawyer is admitted. The matter, although involving other jurisdictions, may have a significant connection with that jurisdiction. In other cases, significant aspects of the lawyer’s work might be conducted in that jurisdiction or a significant aspect of the matter may involve the law of that jurisdiction. The necessary relationship might arise when the client’s activities or the legal issues involve multiple jurisdictions, such asfor example, when the officers of a multinational corporation survey potential business sites and seek the services of their lawyer in assessing the relative merits of each. In addition, the services may draw on the lawyer’s recognized expertise developed through regular practice of law in a body of law that is applicable to the client’s particular matter.
Subdivision (d)(4) permits a lawyer admitted in a non-United States jurisdiction to provide certain services on a temporary basis in Florida that are performed for a client who resides in or has an office in the jurisdiction where the lawyer is authorized to practice or arise out of or are reasonably related to a matter that has a substantial connection to a jurisdiction in which the lawyer is authorized to practice to the extent of that authorization but are not within subdivisions (d)(2) and (d)(3). The scope of the work the lawyer could perform under this provision would be limited to the services the lawyer may perform in the authorizing jurisdiction. For example, if a German lawyer came to the United States to negotiate on behalf of a client in Germany, the lawyer would be authorized to provide only those services that the lawyer is authorized to provide for that client in Germany. Subdivision (d)(5) permits a lawyer admitted in a non-United States jurisdiction to provide services in Florida that are governed primarily by international law or the law of a non-United States jurisdiction in which the lawyer is a member.
A lawyer who practices law in Florida pursuant to subdivisions (c), (d), or otherwise is subject to the disciplinary authority of Florida. A lawyer who practices law in Florida pursuant to subdivision (c) must inform the client that the lawyer is not licensed to practice law in Florida.
The Supreme Court of Florida has determined that it constitutes the unlicensed practice of law for a lawyer admitted to practice law in a jurisdiction other than Florida to advertise to provide legal services in Florida which the lawyer is not authorized to provide. The rule was adopted in 820 So. 2d 210 (Fla. 2002). The court first stated the proposition in 762 So. 2d 392, 394 (Fla. 1999). Subdivisions (c) and (d) do not authorize advertising legal services to prospective clients in Florida by lawyers who are admitted to practice in jurisdictions other than Florida. Whether and how lawyers may communicate the availability of their services to prospective clients in Florida is governed by rules 4-7.1 through 4-7.10subchapter 4-7.
A lawyer who practices law in Florida is subject to the disciplinary authority of Florida.
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4-7. Information about Legal Services
Rule 4-7.22 Lawyer Referral Services
(a) When Lawyers May Accept Referrals. A lawyer may not accept referrals from a lawyer referral service, and it is a violation of these Rules Regulating The Florida Bar to do so, unless the service:
    (1) engages in no communication with the public and in no direct contact with prospective clients in a manner that would violate the Rules of Professional Conduct if the communication or contact were made by the lawyer;
    (2) receives no fee or charge that constitutes a division or sharing of fees, unless the service is a not-for-profit service approved by The Florida Bar pursuant to chapter 8 of these rules;
    (3) refers clients only to persons lawfully permitted to practice law in Florida when the services to be rendered constitute the practice of law in Florida;
    (4) does not directly or indirectly require the lawyer to refer clients to any other person or entity for other services and does not place any economic pressure or incentive on the lawyer to make such referrals;
    (45) carries or requires each lawyer participating in the service to carry professional liability insurance in an amount not less than $100,000 per claim or occurrence;
    (56) furnishes The Florida Bar at its headquarters address in Tallahassee, on a quarterly basis, the names and Florida bar membership numbers of all lawyers participating in the service;
    (67) furnishes The Florida Bar at its headquarters address in Tallahassee, on a quarterly basis, the names of all persons authorized to act on behalf of the service;
    (78) responds in writing, within 15 days, to any official inquiry by bar counsel when bar counsel is seeking information described in this subdivision or conducting an investigation into the conduct of the service or a lawyer who accepts referrals from the service provided that a lawyer who has notified The Florida Bar of the lawyer’s participation in the lawyer referral service will not be subject to discipline for violation of this subdivision unless the lawyer has been notified by The Florida Bar of the service’s failure to respond to the bar’s inquiry;
    (89) neither represents nor implies to the public that the service is endorsed or approved by The Florida Bar, unless the service is subject approved by The Florida Bar pursuant to chapter 8 of these rules;
    (910) uses its actual legal name or a registered fictitious name in all communications with the public;
    (1011) affirmatively states in all advertisements and other communications to consumers that it is a lawyer referral service; and
    (1112) affirmatively states in all advertisements that lawyers who accept referrals from it pay to participate in the lawyer referral service;
    (13) affirmatively discloses to the consumer at the time a referral is made of the location of a bona fide office by city, town or county of the lawyer to whom the referral is being made; and
    (14) uses a name that is not misleading to consumers; a name that is misleading includes any name that could lead consumers to reasonably conclude that the service is a law firm or directly provides legal services to the public.
(b) Responsibility of Lawyer. A lawyer who accepts referrals from a lawyer referral service:
    (1) is responsible for ensuring that any advertisements or written communications used by the service comply with the requirements of the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar, including the provisions of this subchapter unless the service is approved by The Florida Bar pursuant to chapter 8 of these rules;
    (2) must notify The Florida Bar at its headquarters address in Tallahassee within 15 days of agreeing to accept referrals from a lawyer referral service unless the service is approved by The Florida Bar pursuant to chapter 8 of these rules;
    (3) must notify The Florida Bar at its headquarters address in Tallahassee within 15 days after the lawyer’s relationship with the lawyer referral service terminates unless the service is approved by The Florida Bar pursuant to chapter 8 of these rules;
    (4) must designate one or more lawyers in the law firm who is responsible for compliance with the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar regarding lawyer referral services and for responding to any inquiries by The Florida Bar regarding the lawyer referral service, if the agreement is between a law firm and the lawyer referral service(s), unless the service is approved by The Florida Bar pursuant to chapter 8 of these rules;
    (5) must pay an administrative fee, to be determined by The Florida Bar, to offset The Florida Bar’s expenses in administering this program and enforcing these rules unless the service is approved by The Florida Bar pursuant to chapter 8 of these rules;
    (6) is prohibited from making the initial contact with a prospective client referred to the lawyer by the service in person, by telephone, telegraph, or facsimile, or by electronic or written communication directed to the prospective client that does not meet the requirements of the direct mail rule;
    (7) is prohibited from referring clients to another person, entity, association, organization or service in exchange for receiving referrals from the lawyer referral service;
    (8) is prohibited from accepting referrals from a lawyer referral service that interferes with the lawyer’s professional judgment in representing clients, for example, by requiring the referral of the lawyer’s clients to the lawyer referral service, a beneficial owner of the lawyer referral service, or an entity owned by the lawyer referral service or a beneficial owner of the lawyer referral service;
    (9) is prohibited from referring clients to the lawyer referral service, a beneficial owner of the lawyer referral service, or an entity owned by the lawyer referral service or a beneficial owner of the lawyer referral service, unless the requirements of rules 4-1.7 and 4-1.8 are met and the lawyer provides written disclosure of the relationship to the client and obtains the client’s informed consent confirmed in writing;
    (10) must disclose in writing to clients who were referred by a lawyer referral service at the outset of the representation that the lawyer received the referral from a lawyer referral service and, if the lawyer paid the service, that the lawyer paid the service in order to receive referrals; and
    (11) must charge no fee and/or costs to the client that exceeds the fee and costs that the lawyer would charge the client if no lawyer referral service was involved.
(c) Definition of Lawyer Referral Service. A "lawyer referral service" is:
    (1) any person, group of persons, association, organization, or entity that receives a fee or charge for referring or causing the direct or indirect referral of a potential client to a lawyer drawn from a specific group or panel of lawyers; or
    (2) any group or pooled advertising program operated by any person, group of persons, association, organization, or entity wherein the legal services advertisements utilize a common telephone number or website and potential clients are then referred only to lawyers or law firms participating in the group or pooled advertising program.
A pro bono referral program, in which the participating lawyers do not pay a fee or charge of any kind to receive referrals or to belong to the referral panel, and are undertaking the referred matters without expectation of remuneration, is not a lawyer referral service within the definition of this rule.

Comment

A lawyer may not accept referrals from a lawyer referral service that receives any fee that constitutes a division of legal fees with the lawyer unless the service is approved by The Florida Bar pursuant to chapter 8 of these rules. A flat fee per time period such as a flat weekly, monthly or annual fee would not violate this provision. A fee calculated as a percentage of the fee received by a lawyer would violate the rule. A fixed fee based on the perceived value of the case would violate the rule. A fee per matter accepted by the lawyer would violate this provision. A fee per matter referred to the lawyer would not violate this provision as long as the fee is not contingent on the outcome of the matter and is a reasonable pre-arranged, fixed sum participation fee that does not vary based on the type of matter or the amount at issue in the matter. This fee arrangement is sometimes referred to as “pay per lead.” A fee that is a fixed sum for each time a consumer views information about a specific lawyer, commonly referred to as “pay-per-click” does not violate the rule.
A lawyer participating in a lawyer referral service may not pass on to the client the lawyer’s costs of doing business with the lawyer referral service.
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Chapter 5 Rules Regulating Trust Accounts
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5-1. Generally
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RULE 5-1.1 TRUST ACCOUNTS
(a) Nature of Money or Property Entrusted to Attorney.

    (1) Trust Account Required; Location of Trust Account; Commingling Prohibited. A lawyer shallmust hold in trust, separate from the lawyer’s own property, funds and property of clients or third persons that are in a lawyer’s possession in connection with a representation. All funds, including advances for fees, costs, and expenses, shallmust be kept in a separate bank or savings and loan association account maintained in the state where the lawyer’s office is situated or elsewhere with the consent of the client or third person and clearly labeled and designated as a trust account except:
      (A) A lawyer may maintain funds belonging to the lawyer in the lawyer’s trust account in an amount no more than is reasonably sufficient to pay bank charges relating to the trust account; and
      (B) A lawyer may deposit the lawyer’s own funds into trust to replenish a shortage in the lawyer’s trust account. Any deposits by the lawyer to cover trust account shortages must be no more than the amount of the trust account shortage, but may be less than the amount of the shortage. The lawyer must notify the bar’s lawyer regulation department immediately of the shortage in the lawyer’s trust account, the cause of the shortage, and the amount of the replenishment of the trust account by the lawyer.
    (2) Compliance with Client Directives. Trust funds may be separately held and maintained other than in a bank or savings and loan association account if the lawyer receives written permission from the client to do so and provided that written permission is received before maintaining the funds other than in a separate account.
    (3) Safe Deposit Boxes. If a member of the barlawyer uses a safe deposit box to store trust funds or property, the memberlawyer shallmust advise the institution in which the deposit box is located that it may include property of clients or third persons.
(b) Application of Trust Funds or Property to Specific Purpose. [no change].
(c) Liens Permitted. [no change].
(d) Controversies as to Amount of Fees. [no change].
(e) Notice of Receipt of Trust Funds; Delivery; Accounting. [no change].
(f) Disputed Ownership of Trust Funds. [no change].
(g) Interest on Trust Accounts (IOTA) Program. [no change].
(h) Interest on Funds That Are Not Nominal or Short-Term. [no change].
(i) Unidentifiable Trust Fund Accumulations and Trust Funds Held for Missing Owners. [no change].
(j) Disbursement Against Uncollected Funds. [no change].
(k) Overdraft Protection Prohibited. [no change].
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RULE 5-1.2 TRUST ACCOUNTING RECORDS AND PROCEDURES
(a) Applicability. [no change]
(b) Minimum Trust Accounting Records. [no change]
(c) Responsibility of Lawyers for Firm Trust Accounts and Reporting. [no change]
(d) Minimum Trust Accounting Procedures. The minimum trust accounting procedures that shallmust be followed by all members of The Florida Bar (when a choice of laws analysis indicates that the laws of Florida apply) who receive or disburse trust money or property are as follows:
    (1) The lawyer shallmust cause to be made monthly:
      (A) reconciliations of all trust bank or savings and loan association accounts, disclosing the balance per bank, deposits in transit, outstanding checks identified by date and check number, and any other items necessary to reconcile the balance per bank with the balance per the checkbook and the cash receipts and disbursements journal; and
      (B) a comparison between the total of the reconciled balances of all trust accounts and the total of the trust ledger cards or pages, together with specific descriptions of any differences between the 2 totals and reasons thereforfor these differences.
    (2) At least annually, the lawyer shallmust prepare a detailed listing identifying the balance of the unexpended trust money held for each client or matter.
    (3) The above reconciliations, comparisons, and listings shallmust be retained for at least 6 years.
    (4) The lawyer or law firm shallmust authorize, at the time the account is opened, and request any bank or savings and loan association where the lawyer is a signatory on a trust account to notify Staff Counsel, The Florida Bar, 651 East Jefferson Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2300, in the event the account is overdrawn or any trust check is dishonored or returned due to insufficient funds or uncollected funds, absent bank error.
    (5) The lawyer shall file with The Florida Bar between June 1 and August 15 of each year a trust accounting certificate showing compliance with these rules on a form approved by the board of governors.
(e) Electronic Wire Transfers. [no change]
(f) Record Retention. A lawyer or law firm that receives and disburses client or third-party funds or property must maintain the records required by this chapter for 6 years subsequent to the final conclusion of each representation in which the trust funds or property were received.
    (1) On dissolution of a law firm or of any legal professional corporation, the partners shall make reasonable arrangements for the maintenance and retention of client trust account records specified in this rule.
    (2) On the sale of a law practice, the seller must make reasonable arrangements for the maintenance and retention of trust account records specified in this rule consistent with other requirements regarding the sale of a law firm set forth in Chapter 4 of these rules.
(g) Audits. Any of the following are cause for The Florida Bar to order an audit of a trust account:
    (1) failure to file the trust account certificate required by rule 5-1.2(c)(5);
    (2)(1) return of a trust account check for insufficient funds or for uncollected funds, absent bank error;
    (3)(2) filing of a petition for creditor relief on behalf of a lawyer;
    (4)(3) filing of felony charges against a lawyer;
    (5)(4) adjudication of insanity or incompetence or hospitalization of a lawyer under The Florida Mental Health Act;
    (6)(5) filing of a claim against a lawyer with the Clients’ Security Fund;
    (7)(6) when requested by the chair or vice chair of a grievance committee or the board of governors; or
    (8)(7) upon court order; or
    (9)(8) upon entry of an order of disbarment, on consent or otherwise.
(h) Cost of Audit. [no change]
(i) Failure to Comply With Subpoena for Trust Accounting Records. [no change]
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Chapter 6 Legal Specialization and Education Programs
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6-3. Florida Certification Plan
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RULE 6-3.7 EMERITUS SPECIALIST STATUS
(a) Purpose. The purpose of emeritus specialist status is to recognize the past and continuing contribution of a certified lawyer in the advancement of the speciality area through related career activities that do not constitute the actual practice of law. For purposes of this rule, the "practice of law" means legal work performed for purposes of rendering legal services, advice, or representation.
(b) Applicability. An applicant who seeks emeritus specialist status shall:

    (1) be currently board certified by The Florida Bar;
    (2) be a member of The Florida Bar in good standing;
    (3) no longer be engaged in the practice of law; and
    (4) otherwise comply with the applicable rules and policies governing emeritus specialist status.
(c) Qualifications. To qualify for emeritus specialist status, a member shall:
    (1) not engage in the active practice of law;
    (2) demonstrate integrity and professionalism, and submit to peer review as required by the board of legal specialization and education;
    (3) promptly report to the board of legal specialization and education any disciplinary complaints or malpractice actions filed against the member;
    (4) file the annual audit and pay the annual fee; and
    (5) complete the required application and pay the specified fee.
(d) Communication. As an emeritus specialist, the member must:
    (1) refrain from any written or oral communication that might be misconstrued as client solicitation for legal services; and,
    (2) identify emeritus specialist status in all written or oral communication concerning board certification.
(e) Termination of Emeritus Specialist Status. At such time as the member elects to resume the practice of law, the member may regain recertification as a "certified specialist" upon:
    (1) completion of all requirements for recertification within a time frame to be determined by the board of legal specialization and education; and
    (2) completion of the required application and payment of the specified fee.
(f) Waiver. On special application and for good cause shown, the board of legal specialization and education may waive any portion of this rule if it determines such a waiver to be in the best interest of the certification program and emeritus status.
(g) Revocation. Existing rules relating to certification revocation shall also apply to emeritus specialist status.
(h) Exemption. During the 6 years following the effective date of this rule, any member formerly certified by The Florida Bar, whose certificate lapsed or was otherwise not renewed, may apply for emeritus status and qualify for an exemption from the provision that requires current certification. The applicant must demonstrate compliance with all other requirements of this rule. An applicant formerly certified by The Florida Bar, but whose certificate was revoked, is ineligible for this exemption.
* * *
RULE 6-3.11 FEES
(a) Application Filing Fee. This fee is for the filing and review of an individual’s certification or recertification application. This fee is not refundable.
(b) Examination/Certification Fee. This fee must be paid before the taking of the examination for certification or before an applicant who otherwise qualifies receives a certificate. This fee is not refundable.
(c) Annual Fee. This fee is assessed against each plan participant required to file an annual audit for a particular year. Collection of the fee shall coincides with the distribution of annual audit forms.
(d) Recertification Extension Fee. This fee is for extending the filing date of an application for recertification. This fee is not refundable.
(e) Challenge/Petition Filing Fee. This fee must accompany the filing of a challenge of an application denial or a petition for grade review. This fee is not refundable.
(f) Appeal Filing Fee. This fee must accompany the filing of an appeal. This fee is not refundable.
(g) Emeritus Application Fee. This fee must accompany the filing of an application for emeritus specialist status. This fee is not refundable.
(h g) Course Evaluation Fee. This fee is assessed against course sponsors that seek continuing legal education credit hours required under the plan. This fee is not refundable.
(i h) Individual Credit Approval Fee. This fee is assessed against applicants or plan participants to cover administrative costs of processing a credit request where a sponsor has not sought course approval under the plan.
* * *
6-12. Basic Skills Course Requirement Rule
RULE 6-12.3 REQUIREMENT
(a) Course Components. Compliance with BSCR shall includes:
    (1) in-person attendance at a 1-daycompletion of a Practicing with Professionalism program sponsored by the YLD; and
    (2) completion of 3 elective, basic, substantive continuing legal education programs sponsored by the YLD.
(b) Time for Completion. BSCR shallmust be completed as follows:
    (1) the Practicing with Professionalism program shallmust be completed no sooner than 12 months prior to or no later than 12 months following admission to The Florida Bar; and
    (2) the 3 elective, basic, substantive continuing legal education programs shallmust be completed during the member’s initial 3-year continuing legal education requirement reporting cycle assigned upon admission to The Florida Bar.
* * *
6-29. Standards for Board Certification in Juvenile Law
Rule 6-29.1 GENERALLY
A lawyer who is an active member in good standing of The Florida Bar and who meets the standards prescribed below may be issued a certificate identifying the lawyer as “Board Certified in Juvenile Law.” The purpose of the standards is to identify those lawyers who practice juvenile law and have the special knowledge, skills, and proficiency, as well as the character, ethics, and reputation for professionalism, to be properly identified to the public as board certified in juvenile law.
* * *
Rule 6-29.2 DEFINITIONS
(a) Juvenile Law. “Juvenile law” is the area of law that inherently and directly impacts children. It includes, but is not limited to, dependency, delinquency, and termination of parental rights matters. It does not include adoption matters or matters arising in the context of family law proceedings not consolidated with dependency or termination of parental rights matters.
(b) Trial. A “trial” is defined as substantially preparing a case for court, offering testimony or evidence, or cross-examination of witness(es), in an adversarial proceeding before a trier of fact, and submission of a case to the trier of fact for determination of the matter.
(c) Appellate proceeding. An “appellate proceeding” is defined as an action in a state or federal court seeking review of a decision of a lower tribunal.
(d) Practice of Law. The “practice of law” for this area is defined in rule 6-3.5(c)(1).
* * *
Rule 6-29.3 MINIMUM STANDARDS
(a) Minimum Period of Practice. The applicant must have been substantially engaged in the practice of law for at least 5 years immediately preceding the application date.
(b) Practice Requirements. The practice requirements are as follows:
    (1) Substantial Involvement. The applicant must demonstrate substantial involvement in the practice of juvenile law during 3 of the last 5 years, immediately preceding application.
    (2) Practical Experience. The applicant must demonstrate substantial practical experience in juvenile law by providing examples of service as the lead advocate on behalf of a governmental entity, a child, a parent, a guardian, a foster parent, or a child’s relative with standing to litigate, in a minimum of 20 fully adjudicated trials or appellate proceedings arising from petitions for dependency, termination of parental rights, or delinquency. If at least 10 of the trials or appeals required by this provision occurred during the 5 years immediately preceding application, the requirements of rule 6-29.3(b)(1) are met.
    (3) Other Experience. On good cause shown, the juvenile law certification committee may substitute other experience in juvenile law as defined for the portion of the trials or appellate proceedings as it deems appropriate. This experience may include, but is not limited to:
      (A) handling school issues, including disciplinary issues and educational planning matters, participating in placement determinations, and the development of treatment and alternative plans;
      (B) dealing with matters relating to governmental benefits;
      (C) advocacy after termination of parental rights;
      (D) advocacy before the Florida Department of Children and Families or other agencies;
      (E) advocacy in juvenile delinquency matters other than trial or appellate proceedings;
      (F) representation at administrative proceedings; and
      (G) resolving health care matters.
(c) Peer Review.
    (1) The applicant must submit the names and addresses of 6 lawyers, who are neither relatives nor current associates or partners nor who practice in the same governmental entity as the applicant. At least 4 of the references must be members of The Florida Bar. Individuals serving as references must have experience in juvenile law and be sufficiently familiar with the applicant to attest to the applicant’s special competence in juvenile law, as well as the applicant’s character, ethics, and reputation for professionalism in the practice of law.
    (2) The applicant must submit the name and address of 1 judge before whom the applicant has appeared in a juvenile law matter within the 5-year period immediately preceding application to attest to the applicant’s competence in juvenile law, as well as the applicant’s character, ethics, and reputation for professionalism.
    (3) The board of legal specialization and education and the juvenile law certification committee may authorize references from persons other than lawyers and may also make additional inquiries it deems appropriate to determine the applicant’s qualifications for certification.
(d) Education. The applicant must demonstrate completion of 50 credit hours of approved continuing legal education in juvenile law during the 3-year period immediately preceding the date of application. Accreditation of educational hours is subject to policies established by the juvenile law certification committee or the board of legal specialization and education.
(e) Examination. The applicant must pass an examination administered uniformly to all applicants to demonstrate sufficient knowledge, proficiency, experience, and professionalism in juvenile law to justify the representation of special competence to the legal profession and the public.
(f) Exemption. An applicant who meets the standards set forth in subdivisions (a) - (d) of this rule and those of rule 6-3.5(d) are exempt from the examination. This exemption is only applicable to those applicants who apply within the first 2 application filing periods from the effective date of these standards.
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Rule 6-29.4 RECERTIFICATION
During the 5-year period immediately preceding application, an applicant must satisfy the following requirements for recertification:
(a) Substantial Involvement. The applicant must demonstrate continuous and substantial involvement in juvenile law throughout the period since the last date of certification or recertification.
(b) Trials or Appellate Actions. The applicant must have had sole or primary responsibility in at least 10 trials or appellate actions involving juvenile law. When primary responsibility is used to meet this requirement, the applicant must specifically identify any co-counsel and demonstrate to the satisfaction of the juvenile law certification committee that the applicant’s level of participation was substantial and direct. On good cause shown, the juvenile law certification committee may substitute other experience for any portion of the trials or appellate proceedings it deems appropriate. This experience may include, but is not limited to, the matters set forth in Rule 6-29.3(b)(3). Compliance with this provision constitutes a prima facie showing of compliance with the requirements of rule 6-29.4(a).
(c) Education. The applicant must demonstrate completion of at least 50 credit hours of approved continuing legal education in juvenile law certification. Accreditation of educational hours is subject to policies established by the juvenile law certification committee or the board of legal specialization and education.
(d) Peer Review.
    (1) The applicant must submit the names and address of at least 4 lawyers who are neither relatives nor current associates or partners nor who practice in the same governmental entity as the applicant, as references to attest to the applicant’s substantial involvement and competence in juvenile law, as well as the applicant’s character, ethics, and reputation for professionalism. These lawyers must have experience in juvenile law and be familiar with the applicant’s practice.
    (2) The applicant must submit the name and address of at least 1 judge before whom the applicant has appeared within the last 5 years to attest to the applicant’s competence in juvenile law, as well as the applicant’s character, ethics, and reputation for professionalism.
    (3) The juvenile law certification committee may, at its option, send reference forms to other lawyers and judges, as well as any other person the committee deems appropriate.
* * *

Chapter 10 Rules Governing the Investigation and Prosecution of the unlicensed Practice of Law
* * *
10-2. Definitions
* * *
RULE 10-2.1 GENERALLY
Whenever used in these rules the following words or terms shall have the meaning herein set forth unless the use thereof shall clearly indicate a different meaning:
(a) Unlicensed Practice of Law. The unlicensed practice of law shall mean the practice of law, as prohibited by statute, court rule, and case law of the state of Florida.
(b) Paralegal or Legal Assistant. A paralegal or legal assistant is a person qualified by education, training, or work experience, who works under the supervision of a member of The Florida Bar and who performs specifically delegated substantive legal work for which a member of The Florida Bar is responsible. A nonlawyer or a group of nonlawyers may not offer legal services directly to the public by employing a lawyer to provide the lawyer supervision required under this rule. It shall constitute the unlicensed practice of law for a person who does not meet the definition of paralegal or legal assistant to use the title paralegal, legal assistant, or other similar term in offering to provide or in providing services directly to the public.
(c) Nonlawyer or Nonattorney. For purposes of this chapter, a nonlawyer or nonattorney is an individual who is not a member of The Florida Bar. This includes, but is not limited to, lawyers admitted in other jurisdictions, law students, law graduates, applicants to The Florida Bar, disbarred lawyers, and lawyers who have resigned from The Florida Bar. A suspended lawyer, while a member of The Florida Bar during the period of suspension as provided elsewhere in these rules, does not have the privilege of practicing law in Florida during the period of suspension. For purposes of this chapter, it shall constitute the unlicensed practice of law for a lawyer admitted in a statejurisdiction other than Florida to advertise to provide legal services in Florida which the lawyer is not authorized to provide.
(d) This Court or the Court. This court or the court shall mean the Supreme Court of Florida.
(e) Bar Counsel. Bar counsel is a member of The Florida Bar representing The Florida Bar in any proceeding under these rules.
(f) Respondent. A respondent is a nonlawyer who is accused of engaging in the unlicensed practice of law or whose conduct is under investigation.
(g) Referee. A referee is the judge or retired judge appointed to conduct proceedings as provided under these rules.
(h) Standing Committee. The standing committee is the committee constituted according to the directives contained in these rules.
(i) Circuit Committee. A circuit committee is a local unlicensed practice of law circuit committee.
(j) UPL Counsel. UPL counsel is the director of the unlicensed practice of law department and an employee of The Florida Bar employed to perform such duties, as may be assigned, under the direction of the executive director.
(k) UPL. UPL is the unlicensed practice of law.
(l) The Board or Board of Governors. The board or board of governors is the Board of Governors of The Florida Bar.
(m) Designated Reviewer. The designated reviewer is a member of the board of governors responsible for review and other specific duties as assigned by the board of governors with respect to a particular circuit committee or matter. If a designated reviewer recuses or is unavailable, any other board member may serve as designated reviewer in that matter. The designated reviewer will be selected, from time to time, by the board members from the circuit of such circuit committee. If circuits have an unequal number of circuit committees and board members, review responsibility will be reassigned, from time to time, to equalize workloads. On such reassignments responsibility for all pending cases from a particular committee passes to the new designated reviewer. UPL staff counsel will be given written notice of changes in the designated reviewing members for a particular committee.
(n) Executive Committee. The executive committee is the executive committee of the Board of Governors of The Florida Bar. All acts and discretion required by the board under these rules may be exercised by its executive committee between meetings of the board as may from time to time be authorized by standing policies of the board of governors
* * *
10-7. Proceedings before a Referee
Rule 10-7.2 Proceedings for Indirect Criminal Contempt
(a) Petitions for Indirect Criminal Contempt. Nothing within these rules prohibits or limits the right of the court to issue a permanent injunction in lieu of or in addition to any punishment imposed for an indirect criminal contempt.

    (1) Upon receiving a sworn petition of the president, executive director of The Florida Bar, or the chair of the standing committee alleging facts indicating that a person, firm, or corporation is or may be unlawfully practicing law or has failed to pay restitution as provided elsewhere in this chapter, and containing a prayer for a contempt citation, the court may issue an order directed to the respondent, stating the essential allegations charged and requiring the respondent to appear before a referee appointed by the court to show cause why the respondent should not be held in contempt of this court for the unlicensed practice of law or for the failure to pay restitution as ordered. The referee must be a circuit judge of the state of Florida. The order must specify the time and place of the hearing, and a reasonable time must be allowed for preparation of the defense after service of the order on the respondent.
    (2) The respondent, personally or by counsel, may move to dismiss the order to show cause, move for a statement of particulars, or answer suchthe order by way of explanation or defense. All motions and the answer must be in writing. A respondent’s omission to file motions or answer will not be deemed an admission of guilt of the contempt charged.
(b) Indigency of Respondent. Any respondent who is determined to be indigent by the referee is entitled to the appointment of counsel.
    (1) Affidavit. A respondent asserting indigency must file with the referee a completed affidavit containing the statutory financial information required to be submitted to the clerk of court when determining indigent status and stating that the affidavit is signed under oath and under penalty of perjury.
    (2) Determination. After reviewing the affidavit and questioning the respondent, the referee must make one of the following determinations:will determine whether the respondent is indigent or the respondent is not indigent.
In making this determination, the referee must consider the applicable statutory criteria used by the clerk of court when determining indigent status and the applicable statutory factors considered by a court when reviewing that determination.
(c) Proceedings Before the Referee. Proceedings before the referee must be in accordance with the following:
    (1) Venue for the hearing before the referee must be in the county where the respondent resides or where the alleged offense was committed, whichever is designated by the court.
    (2) The court or referee may issue an order of arrest of the respondent if the court or referee has reason to believe the respondent will not appear in response to the order to show cause. The respondent will be admitted to bail in the manner provided by law in criminal cases.
    (3) The respondent will be arraigned and enter a plea at the time of the hearing before the referee, or prior upon request. A subsequent hearing to determine the guilt or innocence of the respondent will follow a plea of not guilty. The date and time of the subsequent hearing will be set at the arraignment. The respondent is entitled to be represented by counsel, have compulsory process for the attendance of witnesses, and confront witnesses against the respondent. The respondent may testify in the respondent’s own defense. No respondent may be compelled to testify. A presumption of innocence will be accorded the respondent. The Florida Bar, which will actacting as prosecuting authority, must prove guilt of the respondent beyond a reasonable doubt.
    (4) Subpoenas for the attendance of witnesses and the production of documentary evidence will be issued in the name of the court by the referee upon request of a party. Failure or refusal to comply with any subpoena is acontempt of court and may be punished by the court or by any circuit court where the action is pending or where the contemnor may be found, as if saidthe refusal were a contempt of that court.
    (5) The referee will hear all issues of law and fact and all evidence and testimony presented will be transcribed.
    (6) At the conclusion of the hearing, the referee will sign and enter of record a judgment of guilty or not guilty. There should be included in a judgment of guilty a recital of the facts constituting the contempt of which the respondent has been found and adjudicated guilty, and the costs of prosecution, including investigative costs and restitution, if any, will be included and entered in the judgment rendered against the respondent. The amount of restitution must be specifically set forth in the judgment and must not exceed the amount paid to respondent by complainant(s). The judgment must also state the name of the complainant(s) to whom restitution is to be made, the amount of restitution to be made, and the date by which it shallmust be completed. The referee has discretion over the timing of payments, over how those payments are to be distributed to multiple complainant(s), and whether restitution will bear interest at the legal rate provided for judgments in this state. In determining the amount of restitution to be paid to complainant(s), the referee will consider any documentary evidence that shows the amount paid to respondent by complainant(s), including cancelled checks, credit card receipts, receipts from respondent, and any other documentation evidencing the amount of payment. Nothing in this section precludes an individual from seeking redress through civil proceedings to recover fees or other damages.
    (7) Prior to the pronouncement of a recommended sentence upon a judgment of guilty, the referee will inform the respondent of the accusation and judgment and afford the opportunity to present evidence of mitigating circumstances. The recommended sentence will be pronounced in open court and in the presence of the respondent.
(d) Record.
    (1) Contents. The record must includes all items properly filed in the cause including pleadings, recorded testimony, if transcribed, exhibits in evidence, and the report of the referee.
    (2) Preparation and Filing. The referee, with the assistance of bar counsel, must prepare the record, certify that the record is complete, serve a copy of the index of the record on the respondent and The Florida Bar, and file the record with the office of the clerk of the Supreme Court of Florida.
    (3) Supplementing or Removing Items from the Record. The respondent and The Florida Bar may seek to supplement the record or have items removed from the record by filing a motion with the referee for suchthat purpose, provided suchthe motion is filed within 15 days of the service of the index. Denial of a motion to supplement the record or to remove an item from the record may be reviewed in the same manner as provided for in the rule on appellate review under these rules.
(e) Review by the Supreme Court of Florida. The judgment and recommended sentence, upon a finding of “guilty,” together with the entire record of proceedings must be forwarded to the Supreme Court of Florida for approval, modification, or rejection based upon the law. The petitioner or the respondent may file objections, together with a supporting brief or memorandum of law, to the referee’s judgment and recommended sentence within 30 days of the date of filing with the court of the referee’s judgment, recommended sentence, and record of proceedings, or in the case where a party seeks review of a referee’s denial to supplement or remove an item from the record, within 30 days after the court issues its ruling on that matter. Denial of a motion to supplement the record or to remove an item from the record may be reviewed in the same manner as provided for in the rule on appellate review under these rules.
The Florida Bar may file a responsive brief or memorandum of law within 20 days after service of respondent’s brief or memorandum of law. The respondent may file a reply brief or memorandum of law within 20 days after service of The Florida Bar’s responsive brief or memorandum of law.A responsive brief or memorandum of law may be filed within 20 days after service of the initial brief or memorandum of law. A reply brief or memorandum of law may be filed within 20 days after service of the responsive brief or memorandum of law.
(f) Fine or Punishment. The punishment for an indirect criminal contempt under this chapter will be a fine not to exceed $2500, imprisonment of up to 5 months, or both.
(g) Costs and Restitution. The court may also award costs and restitution.
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Chapter 18 Military legal assistance counsel rule
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18-1. Generally
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RULE 18-1.1 PURPOSE
The purpose of this chapter is to expand the delivery of legal assistance services to military personnel stationed in the state of Florida. This chapter authorizes military attorneyslawyers licensed to practice law in jurisdictions other than Florida to be certified to practice before Florida courts while formally assigned as a legal assistance attorneylawyer at a military base in the state of Florida. Nothing contained in this chapter limits the scope of practice or services provided by legal assistance lawyers under Title 10, United States Code, section 1044, and applicable service regulations.
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RULE 18-1.2 DEFINITIONS
(a) Authorized Legal Assistance AttorneyLawyer. An “authorized legal assistance attorneylawyer” is any person who:

    (1) is admitted to practice law by the highest court of another state, the District of Columbia, or a territory of the United States;
    (2) is serving on active duty within the Department of Defense (including the National Guard while in federal service) or the Department of Transportation (with respect to the United States Coast Guard);
    (3) is assigned to an installation, unit, and/or activity located within the geographic limitations of the courts of the state of Florida; and
    (4) has completedcompletes The Florida Bar Young Lawyers Division Practicing with Professionalism program (Basic Skills Course Requirement) within the time required by rule 6-12.3; and
    (5)(4) appears in connection with official duties as a legal assistance attorneylawyer.
(b) Approved Legal Assistance Office. An “approved legal assistance office” for the purposes of this chapter is a military command tasked with providing legal assistance as approved by the Department of Defense or Department of Transportation.
(c) Supervising AttorneyLawyer. A “supervising attorneylawyer” as used herein is a member in good standing of The Florida Bar who supervises an authorized legal assistance attorneylawyer engaged in activities permitted by this chapter. The supervising attorneylawyer must:
    (1) be employed by or be a participating volunteer for an approved legal assistance office (to specifically include military reserve attorneyslawyers); and
    (2) assume personal professional responsibility for supervising the conduct of the matter, litigation, or administrative proceeding in which the authorized legal assistance attorneylawyer participates.
(d) Authorized Legal Assistance Client. An “authorized legal assistance client” is:
    (1) an active duty military member who is assigned to an installation, unit, and/or activity located within the state of Florida and who otherwise meets current income eligibility guidelines of the Legal Services Corporation;
    (2) a military retiree who resides within the state of Florida and who otherwise meets current income eligibility guidelines of the Legal Services Corporation;
    (3) the dependents of any active duty military member or retiree who are otherwise residents of the state of Florida and meet current income eligibility guidelines of the Legal Services Corporation; or
    (4) for purposes of settling the affairsthe surviving family members who are Florida residents of an active duty military member who died while in active military service for purposes of settling the deceased military member’s affairs, the surviving family members of such decedent who are otherwise residents of the state of Florida.
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RULE 18-1.3 ACTIVITIES
(a) Permissible Activities. An authorized legal assistance attorneylawyer, in association with an approved legal assistance office and under the supervision of a supervising attorneylawyer, may perform the following activities:
    (1) appear in any court or before any administrative tribunal in this state on behalf of an authorized legal assistance client, provided the person on whose behalf the authorized legal assistance attorneylawyer is appearing has consented in writing to that appearance and a supervising attorneylawyer has given written approval for that appearance;
    (2) prepare pleadings and other documents to be filed in any court or before any administrative tribunal in this state in any matter in which the authorized legal assistance attorneylawyer is involved, provided all notices of appearance, pleadings, and documents bear the attorney’slawyer’s name, the name of the bar to which admitted, that jurisdiction’s bar number, and the legend “Rule 18 Military Legal Assistance AttorneyLawyer”; or
    (3) engage in such other preparatory activities as are necessary for any matter in which the authorized legal assistance attorneylawyer is involved.
Nothing contained herein shall limit the scope of services provided by legal assistance attorneys under Title 10, United States Code, section 1044, and applicable service regulations.
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RULE 18-1.4 SUPERVISION AND LIMITATIONS
(a) Supervision by AttorneyLawyer. An authorized legal assistance attorneylawyer must perform all activities authorized by this chapter under the supervision of a supervising attorneylawyer.
(b) Representation of Bar Membership Status. Authorized legal assistance attorneyslawyers permitted to perform services under this chapter are not, and shallmay not represent themselves to be, members in good standing of The Florida Bar licensed to practice law in this state.
(c) Range of Legal Issues for Which Representation is Permitted. An authorized legal assistance attorneylawyer may appear in court on behalf of authorized legal assistance clients provided the appearance is made concerning a civil matter limited to 1 of the following actions:
    (1) all residential landlord/tenant disputes under applicable statutory law;
    (2) all actions in small claims court;
    (3) domestic relations matters limited solely to name changes, adoptions, paternity, dissolution, child custody, child/spousal support enforcement, or modification of prior judgments or orders;
    (4) routine or statutory probate matters limited solely to summary administration and disposition of property without administration under applicable statutory law;
    (5) all actions under the Florida Consumer Collection Practices Act; and
    (6) all actions under the Florida Motor Vehicle Repair Act; and
    (7) any other proceedings if otherwise permitted by applicable law regarding appearances by foreign attorneyslawyers.
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RULE 18-1.5 CERTIFICATION
Permission for an authorized legal assistance attorneylawyer to perform services under this chapter shallwill become effective upon filing with and approval by the clerk of the Supreme Court of Florida. of: The person seeking approval must file the following:
(a) a letter from the commanding officer of the approved legal assistance office stating that the authorized legal assistance attorneylawyer is currently assigned with that legal assistance office and that an attorneya Florida bar member employed by or participating as a volunteer with that legal assistance office will assume the required duties of the supervising lawyerattorney required hereunder;
(b) a certificate from the highest court or agency in theany state, territory, or district in which the authorized legal assistance attorneylawyer is licensed to practice law certifying that the authorized legal assistance attorneylawyer is a member in good standing and has a clear disciplinary record, and advising of any pending complaints and/or investigations involving the authorized legal assistance attorneylawyer; and
(c) a sworn statement by the authorized legal assistance attorneylawyer that the attorneylawyer:
    (1) has read and is familiar withwill abide by chapter 4 of the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar as adopted by the Supreme Court of Florida and will abide by the provisions thereof;
    (2) has completed or will complete The Florida Bar Young Lawyers Division Practicing with Professionalism program (Basic Skills Course Requirement) within the time required by rule 6-12.3; and
    (3) submits to the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court of Florida for disciplinary purposes, as defined by chapter 3 and rule 18-1.7 of the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar, and authorizes the practitioner’s home state to be advised of any disciplinary action taken in Florida.
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RULE 18-1.6 WITHDRAWAL OR TERMINATION OF CERTIFICATION
[no change]
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RULE 18-1.7 DISCIPLINE
[no change]

[Revised: 03-27-2015]