The Florida Bar

News Releases

SUPREME COURT DISCIPLINES 6 ATTORNEYS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 28, 2024
CONTACT: Jennifer Krell Davis, [email protected]
Communications

Summaries of orders issued from March 1, 2024, to March 28, 2024

The Florida Bar, the state’s guardian for the integrity of the legal profession, announces that the Florida Supreme Court in recent court orders disciplined six attorneys, disbarring one, suspending four and reprimanding one.

The Florida Supreme Court, The Florida Bar and its Division of Lawyer Regulation are charged with administering a statewide disciplinary system to enforce Supreme Court rules of professional conduct for the more than 111,000 members of The Florida Bar. Key discipline case files that are public record are posted to attorneys’ individual online Florida Bar profiles. To view discipline documents, follow these steps. Information on the discipline system and how to file a complaint are available at www.floridabar.org/attorneydiscipline.

Court orders are not final until time expires to file a rehearing motion and, if filed, determined. The filing of such a motion does not alter the effective date of the discipline. Disbarred lawyers may not re-apply for admission for five years. They are required to go through an extensive process that includes a rigorous background check and retaking the Bar exam. Attorneys suspended for periods of 91 days and longer must undergo a rigorous process to regain their law licenses including proving rehabilitation. Disciplinary revocation is tantamount to disbarment.

Michael Paul Brundage, 100 Main St., Suite 204, Safety Harbor, suspended for three years effective 30 days following a March 13 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1986) This matter involves four complaints in which Brundage failed to keep his clients informed during the representation, failed to act with reasonable diligence and competence, and failed to abide by objectives and scope of representation. Brundage also failed to respond to multiple orders, resulting in dismissal of three of the cases, and did not timely advise the clients of same. Brundage appealed the referee’s recommendation of one-year suspension of law. Brundage was suspended for three years upon consideration of appellate briefs and response to the court’s order to show cause why the referee’s recommended sanction of a one-year suspension should not be disapproved and a more severe sanction, up to and including a three-year suspension, be imposed. (Case No. SC22-0595)

Tara Gillette, New Port Richey/Dania, suspended for two years with conditions to be met prior to petitioning for reinstatement, effective immediately following a March 21 court order. (Admitted to practice: 2008) On March 1, 2022, Gillette pled guilty to Possession of a Controlled Substance Without Prescription, a third-degree felony. On February 23, 2022, Gillette pled guilty to Possession of a Controlled Substance Without Prescription, a third-degree felony; Burglary of an Unoccupied Conveyance, a third-degree felony; and Petit Theft, a second-degree misdemeanor. On February 14, 2022, Gillette pled guilty to Grand Theft Motor Vehicle, a third-degree felony; Trespass in Unoccupied Structure, a second-degree misdemeanor; and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, a first-degree misdemeanor. Gillette failed to notify the Bar of her arrests, charges and convictions in the matters. Gillette successfully completed all terms and conditions of her criminal sentences. She cooperated with the Bar investigation and requested settlement. (Case No. SC23-1491)

Albert E. Moon, 19 W. Flagler St., Suite 810, Miami, suspended until he fully responds in writing to the official Bar inquiry and subpoena duces tecum, effective 30 days following a March 19 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1978) Moon failed to respond to official Bar inquiries and the Florida Supreme Court’s order to show cause. On March 19, the Court issued an order granting The Florida Bar’s Petition for Contempt and Order to Show Cause, suspending Moon from the practice of law until he fully responds in writing to the Bar’s inquiry. (Case No. SC23-1717)

Matt Shirk, 25 North Market St., Jacksonville, disbarred, effective immediately following a March 13 court order due to his existing disciplinary suspension. (Admitted to practice: 2000) Shirk was held in contempt of the Supreme Court of Florida’s order in The Florida Bar v. Shirk, No. SC2021-0540 for continuing to engage in the practice of law while he was suspended. Shirk provided legal services to several of his existing immigration clients and filed documents with the immigration court in their pending cases. (Case No. SC23-1440)

Mark Aaron Sobocienski, 170 S.E. 14th St., Ph 7, Miami, suspended until he fully responds in writing to the official Bar inquiry and subpoena duces tecum, effective 30 days following a March 4 court order. (Admitted to practice: 2008) Sobocienski failed to respond to official Bar inquiries and the Florida Supreme Court’s order to show cause. On March 4, the Court issued an order granting The Florida Bar’s Petition for Contempt and Order to Show Cause, suspending Sobocienski from the practice of law until he fully responds in writing to the Bar’s inquiry. (Case No. SC23-1743)

Evan Robert Wolfe, 150 S. Pine Island Rd., Suite 300, Plantation, public reprimand effective immediately following a March 14 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1985) In his retainer agreement, Wolfe disclosed to the client that he was not a member of the Utah bar; however, Wolfe’s pre-litigation representation of a Utah resident in a property insurance claim was not permissible under the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar. (Case No. SC2024-0185)

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