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Daily News Summary

The purpose of this summary provided by the Communications Department of The Florida Bar is to present media coverage that may be of interest to members. Opinions expressed in the articles are attributable solely to the authors. The Florida Bar does not adopt or endorse any opinions expressed below. For information on previous articles, please contact the publishing newspaper directly.

December 14, 2017

  1. Legal Profession

    MOSTLY WHITE AND MALE: DIVERSITY STILL LAGS AMONG SCOTUS LAW CLERKS

    National Law Journal | Article | December 11, 2017

    Research conducted by The National Law Journal found that since 2005, 85 percent of all U.S. Supreme Court law clerks have been white. Only 20 of the 487 clerks hired by justices were African-American, and eight were Hispanic. Twice as many men as women gain entry, even though as of last year, more than half of all law students are female. A year as a U.S. Supreme Court law clerk is a priceless ticket to the upper echelons of the legal profession.

  2. Judiciary

    GRASSLEY: TWO CONTROVERSIAL FEDERAL BENCH NOMINEES WON’T BE CONFIRMED

    Washington Post | Article | December 13, 2017

    Sen. Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa) said Wednesday [Dec. 13] that two of President Trump’s nominees for open seats on the federal bench will not be confirmed, just a day after urging the White House to “reconsider” them. Grassley, the Senate Judiciary Committee’s top Republican, said that based on his discussions with the White House, the nominations of Jeff Mateer and Brett Talley would not move forward through the confirmation process. The decision comes after reports that both nominees made public comments celebrating groups or policies that were discriminatory.

  3. Legal Profession

    TECH COACH ADRIANA LINARES BRINGS LAW FIRMS INTO THE PRESENT AND FUTURE

    ABA Journal | Article | December 13, 2017

    Adriana Linares founded LawTech Partners in 2004 after several years in the IT departments of two of the largest firms in Florida. Now she travels across Florida, throughout the country and sometimes abroad as a law practice consultant and legal technology coach. Linares sees practice management as a hub that has various spokes — such as technology, marketing, management, accounting and finance — that help a firm be successful. Starting in 2012, Linares was brought in to help The Florida Bar’s Board of Governors understand pressing technology issues.

  4. Civil Justice Issues

    APPEALS COURT UPHOLDS FLORIDA EDUCATION ‘ADEQUACY’ RULING, SIDES WITH STATE IN 8-YEAR-OLD CASE

    Orlando Sentinel | Article | December 13, 2017

    The First District Court of Appeal on Wednesday [Dec. 13] upheld a lower court ruling in an 8-year-old legal battle between the state and education advocates. The ruling said that Florida judges cannot rule on the best way to educate the state’s students because those decisions, based on the state constitution, rest with lawmakers and the governor. The court, much like the circuit judge in Tallahassee who ruled initially, said the lawsuit dealt with “political questions not subject to judicial review.” The 2009 lawsuit claimed Florida public schools were not adequately funded and did not provide a solid education to all students, in violation of the Florida Constitution.

  5. Civil Justice Issues

    MIAMI BEACH WANTS TO SET A MANDATORY MINIMUM WAGE. A LEGAL CHALLENGE IS BLOCKING THAT

    Miami Herald | Article | December 13, 2017

    In an opinion filed Wednesday [Dec. 13], the Third District Court of Appeal blocked Miami Beach from setting a local minimum wage higher than the statewide minimum, a measure that sparked a legal challenge from statewide business groups. In June 2016, commissioners unanimously voted to set a city minimum wage higher than the statewide minimum. The Florida Retail Federation, Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association and Florida Chamber of Commerce sued the city in December 2016 over the law, arguing that it is pre-empted by state law. Wednesday’s ruling sets the stage for an expected appeal to the Florida Supreme Court.

  6. Civil Justice Issues

    SEMINOLE TRIBE NOW GOING AFTER JAX ‘GAMBLING PARLORS’

    Florida Politics | Article | December 13, 2017

    The Seminole Tribe of Florida has filed suit against 25 operators of what are called “electronic gambling parlors” in the Jacksonville area, saying they violate the Tribe’s deal with the state to exclusively offer Vegas-style games. The suit was filed in Duval County Circuit Civil court last week. An attorney for the Tribe said it felt compelled to sue after the Department of Business and Professional Regulation, which regulates gambling, declined to police the operations because they weren’t serving alcohol.

  7. Legal Discipline

    FLORIDA ETHICS COMMISSION WILL NOT PURSUE COMPLAINT AGAINST FORMER PUBLIC DEFENDER MATT SHIRK

    Florida Times-Union | Article | December 13, 2017

    The Florida Commission on Ethics said Wednesday [Dec. 13] that while it had enough information to believe former public defender Matt Shirk may have violated state ethics laws, it will not pursue the case any further because Shirk is no longer in office. He lost his re-election campaign in 2016 to Charles Cofer. While Shirk will not be penalized for that complaint, he faces a separate state ethics complaint and an investigation by The Florida Bar.

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