The Florida Bar

Daily News Summary

  1. Home
  2. News & Events
  3. Daily News Summary

Daily News Summary

The purpose of this summary provided by the Communications Department of The Florida Bar is to present media coverage that may be of interest to members. Opinions expressed in the articles are attributable solely to the authors. The Florida Bar does not adopt or endorse any opinions expressed below. For information on previous articles, please contact the publishing newspaper directly.

July 15, 2019

  1. The Florida Bar

    PANEL ASKS FOR SOLICITATION RULE REVISIONS

    The Florida Bar | Article | July 15, 2019

    Lawyers should be allowed to hand out business cards to people who discuss legal matters with them in business or casual social situations and exchange online social media information in forums designed for business and professional networking, according to two Bar committees. The Standing Committee on Advertising and Professional Ethics Committee approved the proposed comment amendment to Rule 4-7.18 during the Bar’s Annual Convention in late June. The proposed comment amendment now goes to the Bar Board of Governors and, if approved there, to the Supreme Court.

  2. Judiciary

    ATTORNEY STACY YOUMANS NAMED CIRCUIT JUDGE IN OCALA

    Ocala Star Banner | Article | July 14, 2019

    Ocala attorney Stacy Youmans has been appointed to replace Circuit Judge Willard Pope, who is retiring. Gov. Ron DeSantis’ office announced the appointment on Friday [July 12]. Pope is retiring July 31. “I’m overjoyed and grateful for this opportunity to serve the citizens of the Fifth Circuit Court,” said Youmans, a former prosecutor who is a partner at Blanchard, Merriam, Adel & Kirkland in Ocala.

  3. Criminal Justice Issues

    APPEALS COURT SAYS NEEDELMAN SHOULD BE RETRIED ON CORRUPTION CHARGES

    Florida Today | Article | July 13, 2019

    The Fifth District Court of Appeals has affirmed a trial judge’s decision to order a new trial for former Brevard County Clerk of Courts Mitch Needelman on corruption-related charges because of juror misconduct. Needelman was found guilty of bribery, conspiracy to commit bribery, bid tampering and official misconduct in October 2017. After the trial, though, the court learned that one juror had researched the definition of bribery and its potential penalties and shared that information with other jurors. The trial Judge Marlene Alva said that was enough to warrant a new trial for Needelman.

  4. Civil Justice Issues

    MAN DIED AFTER ORLANDO LEGAL GUARDIAN FILED ‘DO NOT RESUSCITATE’ ORDER AGAINST HIS WISHES, INVESTIGATION FINDS

    Orlando Sentinel | Article | July 15, 2019

    A man died at a Tampa hospital after staff could not perform life-saving procedures because of a “do not resuscitate” order his Orlando guardian filed against his wishes, state investigators determined. The investigation into the final days of 75-year-old Steven Stryker of Cocoa caused Circuit Judge Janet C. Thorpe to seek the removal of his court-appointed guardian, Rebecca Fierle, from 98 Orange County cases at once in a hearing sealed from the media last week. Thorpe found Fierle had “abused her powers” by requesting that incapacitated clients not receive medical treatment if their heart or breathing stopped — without permission from their families or the court, records show.

  5. Civil Justice Issues

    HEARINGS PLANNED ON VOTER SUPPRESSION

    Florida Politics | Article | July 13, 2019

    The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights Florida Advisory Committee will hold the first in a series of public hearings on voter suppression and disenfranchisement on July 23 in Fort Lauderdale. The Florida advisory committee “will review the implementation of the 2018 constitutional measure to end the automatic disenfranchisement of most felons in the state and the impediments to voting or the rejection of ballot issues throughout Florida,” according to a statement issued Friday [July 12] by Nadine Smith, chair of the Florida panel.

  6. Civil Justice Issues

    OPIOID DEATHS DOWN AS STATE CELEBRATES VICTORY IN OPIOID SETTLEMENT

    WFLA (NBC) Channel 8 Tampa | Article | July 14, 2019

    The U.S. government scored a major victory in a lawsuit against a British opioid manufacturer on Thursday [July 11]. The news comes as new statistics show Florida’s opioid crisis may be on the decline. The latest interim report from the state’s Medical Examiners Commission shows there were nearly 300 fewer opioid deaths in the first half of 2018, compared to the first half of 2017. The report was released just days before the U.S. government solidified a $1.4 billion settlement with British opioid manufacturer Reckitt Benckiser. Florida was part of the lawsuit and could be entitled to a portion of the settlement. Florida Attorney General Ashley Moody said the development “should send a strong message to anyone engaging in illicit conduct to increase drug dependency.”

  7. Civil Justice Issues

    DEMOCRATS PUT FLORIDA ELECTION LAW ON TRIAL

    Politico Florida | Article | July 14, 2019

    Democrats will try to convince a federal judge this week to jettison a nearly 70-year-old law guaranteeing that President Donald Trump’s name will be listed first on the 2020 ballot in one of the nation’s biggest battleground states. The legal challenge at issue at the U.S. District Court in Tallahassee today [July 15], which was filed by the Democratic National Committee and other party groups, is just one of several that will challenge Florida election laws ahead of 2020.

  8. Civil Justice Issues

    COURT SWATS STEINGER ISCOE ATTORNEY’S ‘TRIAL BY AMBUSH’ TACTIC IN PERSONAL INJURY LAWSUIT

    Daily Business Review | Article | July 11, 2019

    The Fourth District Court of Appeal on Wednesday [July 10] cautioned against using “trial by ambush” ploys, in its opinion on a personal injury case in which the plaintiff’s expert witness was shown evidence for the first time during trial. Though there were no surprise witnesses or pieces of evidence mid-trial, the appellate court found it wasn’t fair for the plaintiff’s counsel to tell jurors what the expert’s opinion was on a piece of evidence before the expert had actually reviewed it. The ruling means a new trial for the plaintiff, Charles Dixon, who originally was awarded $150,000 in damages.

  9. Legal Profession

    MARIA GARCIA, WHOSE FATHER WAS FIDEL CASTRO’S PRISONER, IS NOW CABA PRESIDENT AND ‘KEEPER’ OF THE LAW

    Daily Business Review | Article | July 12, 2019

    Maria D. Garcia has always known what she wanted. As a child growing up in Miami, she’d tell her parents, exiled from Cuba, that one day she’d be una abogada: an attorney. At Florida International University College of Law, Garcia became president of FIU’s moot court and joined its Cuban American Bar Association chapter. Now Garcia is president of CABA, a nonprofit voluntary bar association founded in 1974 by attorneys with Cuban roots.

Recent Archives: