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Daily News Summary

The purpose of this summary provided by the Communications Department of The Florida Bar is to present media coverage that may be of interest to members. Opinions expressed in the articles are attributable solely to the authors. The Florida Bar does not adopt or endorse any opinions expressed below. For information on previous articles, please contact the publishing newspaper directly.

August 21, 2019

  1. Judiciary

    COURT ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR ITS ‘LAW SCHOOL FOR TEACHERS’

    The Florida Bar News | Article | August 21, 2019

    This week, FloridaBarNews.TV highlights one of the coolest programs ever created by the Florida Supreme Court – the Florida Supreme Court Training Institute, otherwise known as “Law School For Teachers.” And good news: The court is now accepting applications for the next edition in April 2020. Sponsored by The Florida Bar and the Florida Supreme Court, the program is geared toward middle- and high-school educators who are currently teaching civics, law, American government, history or similar subjects. The next class of between 20 and 25 teachers will be held April 19-23 in Tallahassee.

  2. Legal Profession

    MORE PEOPLE ARE APPLYING TO LAW SCHOOL, BUT IT’S NOT LIKE LAST YEAR’S ‘TRUMP BUMP’

    ABA Journal | Article | August 07, 2019

    People applying to law school saw a modest 3.3 percent increase for the 2019-20 admission cycle, according to the Law School Admission Council. The data is as of July 31 and includes 62,427 applicants, Kellye Y. Testy, president and CEO of the LSAC, wrote in an Aug. 5 web post for TaxProf Blog. Last year, there was an 8.1 percent increase in law school applicants, with a total of 60,401 people applying to law school. The development came to be known as the “Trump bump,” with the theory that the president inspired more people to attend law school.

  3. Legislative

    FLORIDA COULD SERVE AS EXAMPLE FOR LAWMAKERS CONSIDERING RED FLAG LAWS

    Health News Florida | Article | August 21, 2019

    Following the shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, Congress is considering a bill that would encourage states to pass red flag laws. Members of Congress may want to study Florida, where such a law has been in place for a year and a half. Since it was adopted, courts have approved some 2,500 risk protection orders. That’s nearly five every day, more than any other state. The Florida law allows police, acting with court approval, to temporarily seize weapons from people deemed to be at risk of harming themselves or others.

  4. Civil Justice Issues

    SUPREME COURT NOTEBOOK: GENDER PRONOUNS PART OF LGBT FIGHT

    Florida Times-Union | Article | August 20, 2019

    Dozens of legal briefs supporting fired funeral director Aimee Stephens at the Supreme Court use “she” and “her” to refer to the transgender woman. So does the appeals court ruling in favor of Stephens that held that workplace discrimination against transgender people is illegal under federal civil rights law. But in more than 110 pages urging the Supreme Court to reverse that decision, the Trump administration and the Michigan funeral home where Stephens worked avoid gender pronouns, repeatedly using Stephens’ name. Stephens’ case is one of two major fights over LGBT rights that will be argued at the high court on Oct. 8. The other tests whether discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation also violates the provision of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964, known as Title 7, that prohibits employers from discriminating on the basis of sex.

  5. Criminal Justice Issues

    U.S. ATTORNEY: PROSECUTION OF MARIJUANA CASES WILL FOCUS ON ‘LARGE-SCALE,’ TRAFFICKING OFFENSES

    WFSU | Article | August 20, 2019

    Last week, the U.S. Attorney for Florida’s Northern District said he’s willing to step in and prosecute marijuana offenses that the state attorney will not. On Tuesday [Aug. 20], U.S. Attorney Larry Keefe offered more specifics. Keefe put out his original statement amid confusion related to state lab testing, which currently can’t tell the difference between marijuana and hemp. After Florida legalized hemp this past legislative session, state attorneys like Jack Campbell said they would press pause on prosecuting marijuana possession cases. Keefe clarified that his office will be focused on prosecuting larger-scale marijuana trafficking – which he says has a “close connection” to “the gun violence that plagues our communities.” Keefe also says legal, marijuana-related businesses will not be targeted.

  6. Civil Justice Issues

    NOAH MCADAMS’ MOM: FAMILY WAS ‘LOOKING FOR ALTERNATIVE TREATMENTS’ TO CHEMO

    WFLA | Article | August 20, 2019

    The mother of Noah McAdams testified in court Tuesday [Aug. 20] and said she and her husband sought “alternative treatments” instead of chemotherapy to treat their son’s cancer. Taylor Bland-Ball and her husband, Joshua McAdams, made global headlines in April when they refused chemotherapy for Noah after he was diagnosed with lymphoblastic leukemia, which affects blood and bone marrow. The family was found in Kentucky, just days after they left Florida refusing a doctor’s orders. The boy remains in custody with a relative. Judge Thomas Palermo will decide what happens with the boy, going forward. His ruling is expected Sept. 9 at 4 p.m.

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