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Daily News Summary

The purpose of this summary provided by the Communications Department of The Florida Bar is to present media coverage that may be of interest to members. Opinions expressed in the articles are attributable solely to the authors. The Florida Bar does not adopt or endorse any opinions expressed below. For information on previous articles, please contact the publishing newspaper directly.

September 06, 2019

  1. Legal Profession

    CHIEF JUSTICE CANADY EXTENDS DEADLINES DUE TO HURRICANE DORIAN

    The Florida Bar News | Article | September 05, 2019

    Today, the Daily News Summary highlights Florida Bar News stories on the extension of state-court legal deadlines in storm-damaged areas and a courthouse security bill filed in the Florida Senate. Missed a state legal deadline due to Hurricane Dorian? Orders now are being issued by Florida Chief Justice Charles Canady retroactively extending state-court legal deadlines in storm-damaged areas. These orders are being posted on the Florida Supreme Court’s Administrative Orders page as they are issued. More orders will be posted over the next few days as local courts continue to reopen as Hurricane Dorian moves northward.

  2. The Florida Bar

    FLORIDA BAR PRESIDENT SAYS PROPOSED PARENTAL LEAVE RULE IS NOT PERFECT BUT IS ‘MOVING THE NEEDLE’

    Daily Business Review | Article | September 05, 2019

    Striving for perfection is important in the practice of law, but it is dragging down progress in achieving diversity in the workplace, Florida Bar President John Stewart told a crowd attending a diversity luncheon co-hosted by several voluntary bars in Miami on Thursday [Sept. 5]. Stewart advocated in favor of a proposed parental leave rule at the Florida Supreme Court last week. The court heard oral arguments over the proposed rule, which says a judge must grant a motion for parental leave for up to three months unless the opposing party can show substantial prejudice. “The rule wasn’t perfect — there’s no question about that — but the concept is a solid one,” he said. “Whatever we do in this arena is not going to be perfect. We need progress in this arena.”

  3. Legislative

    FLORIDA GUARDIANSHIP LAWS AND ELDER LAW ATTORNEYS’ LOBBYING | SPECIAL REPORT

    Orlando Sentinel | Article | September 05, 2019

    The article discusses guardianship issues in Florida, providing an overview of the stakeholders and legislation affecting guardianship cases.

  4. Civil Justice Issues

    PBC WAITS FOR OPIOID CASE TO GO TO TRIAL

    Palm Beach Post | Article | September 05, 2019

    A year and a half after suing three doctors and a slew of drug distributors and manufacturers for their alleged roles in fueling the opioid crisis, Palm Beach County must still wait for its day in court — along with almost 2,000 other interested parties. But the first “bellwether” trial that could signal the success or failure of similar cases filed by local governments against pharmaceutical firms is set to begin Oct. 21 and is expected to last seven weeks. The October trial in a northern Ohio courtroom will pit Summit and Cuyahoga counties in Ohio against Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin.

  5. Legal Profession

    MY STUDENTS ARE THE FUTURE OF JUVENILE JUSTICE | JUDGE IRENE SULLIVAN

    Tampa Bay Times | Column | September 05, 2019

    Irene Sullivan, a retired judge from the 6th Judicial Circuit bench and adjunct professor at Stetson University College of Law in Gulfport, writes: “What [my students] have in common is why teaching juvenile law is so rewarding — almost as rewarding as being a juvenile judge. They may not have bought or sold real property or signed a mortgage or traded stocks or executed a will. They will take those classes. But all 23 of them have been a kid! Just like lawyers and judges and probation officers and case managers in juvenile court, my law students bring their different perspectives, backgrounds and experiences of being a kid.”

  6. Other

    ST. JOHNS COUNTY ATTORNEY HONORED BY GIRL SCOUTS FOR HELPING MOST VULNERABLE RESIDENTS

    Jacksonville Times-Union | Article | September 05, 2019

    Attorney Megan Wall, current managing attorney and pro bono coordinator for St. Johns County Legal Aid, loves her job and it shows in her smile, her demeanor and her long hours on the job. Since 2005, she has worked tirelessly and passionately to help the county’s most vulnerable residents find justice. Wall grew up during the 1960s, and she credits her parents, who she describes as “hippies,” for instilling their values in her — values that made them activists for peace and advocates for the environment. Those beliefs helped lead to her selection as a 2019 Woman of Distinction St. Johns County by the Girl Scouts of Gateway Council.

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