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Daily News Summary

The purpose of this summary provided by the Communications Department of The Florida Bar is to present media coverage that may be of interest to members. Opinions expressed in the articles are attributable solely to the authors. The Florida Bar does not adopt or endorse any opinions expressed below. For information on previous articles, please contact the publishing newspaper directly.

December 04, 2019

  1. The Florida Bar

    GEORGE C. YOUNG AMERICAN INN OF COURT ADDRESSES ETHICAL CHALLENGES

    The Florida Bar | Article | December 04, 2019

    The Daily News Summary features Florida Bar News stories on the Freed to Run marathon series and the George C. Young American Inn of Court meeting.  At the monthly dinner meeting, Pupillage Group One presented a program addressing ethical challenges for lawyers and judges. Pupillage groups provide Inn members an opportunity to become better acquainted with other lawyers and with members of the bench. The pupillage groups are the principal component of the Inn’s mentoring activities.

  2. Judiciary

    FEDERAL JUDGE TAKES STATE’S ATTORNEYS TO TASK OVER AMENDMENT 4 ARGUMENTS

    Miami Herald | Article | December 03, 2019

    U.S District Judge Robert Hinkle on Tuesday [Dec. 3] accused the state of trying to “run out the clock” to keep felons from voting in next year’s elections as the legal battle over a constitutional amendment designed to restore voting rights to felons who have completed terms of their sentences continues. Hinkle ruled in October that it is unconstitutional to deny the right to vote to felons who are “genuinely unable” to pay financial obligations. The state appealed Hinkle’s ruling to the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. In a subsequent motion asking Hinkle to put the case on hold amid the appeal, lawyers for DeSantis and Secretary of State Laurel Lee argued that a decision upholding the federal judge’s ruling could render the entire constitutional amendment void because of a lack of “severability.”

  3. Judiciary

    FLORIDA SUPREME COURT WEIGHS OPENING STATE’S CLOSED PRIMARIES

    Tampa Bay Times | Article | December 03, 2019

    The Florida Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday [Dec. 3] on whether to include a proposed ballot initiative on the 2020 ballot that would allow all registered voters to vote in primaries for state partisan offices regardless of the party affiliation of the voters or candidates beginning in 2024. Under current law, only when a candidate has no opposition from outside their party can all voters cast a vote in that race in the primary. If the court concludes that the proposal is not misleading, it will appear on the 2020 ballot, where it must receive 60 percent of the vote to become law.

  4. Civil Justice

    OCALA COUNCIL BLOCKS WINNING CANDIDATE FROM OFFICE OVER 33-YEAR-OLD FELONY CONVICTION, DELAYS DECISION ON ANOTHER ELECTION

    WUFT | Article | December 03, 2019

    Ocala city attorney Patrick Gilligan stopped the city’s newly elected councilman Tyrone Oliver, 63, as he prepared to take the office Tuesday night over a 33-year-old felony cocaine conviction.  The case is believed to be the first time a Florida politician has been disqualified after an election because of serious crimes. More than 1,000 applications are pending before the state clemency board, including one from Oliver. He has been seeking clemency since 2012.

  5. Civil Justice

    ESCAMBIA COUNTY COMMISSIONER DOUG UNDERHILL LAUNCHES GOFUNDME TO PAY FOR LEGAL DEFENSE

    Pensacola News Journal | Article | December 04, 2019

    Escambia County Commissioner Doug Underhill is turning to the internet to pay for his legal defense in multiple lawsuits against him.  So far, he has raised more than $3,800 through a GoFundMe page to create a legal defense fund. The Florida Commission on Ethics has ruled that public officials can have legal defense funds if all contributions are reported as gifts to public officials as required by Florida law. Underhill has been sued three times for libel, twice by his former political opponent and once by a Pensacola political consultant and businessman.

  6. Legal Profession

    BOCA RATON FIRM ACCUSES BOUTIQUE LAW FIRM OF MISLEADING GOOGLE AD TACTICS

    Law.com | Article | December 03, 2019

    Boca Raton-based personal injury law firm Kanner & Pintaluga is claiming unfair advertising practices by an Atlanta firm, which is allegedly steering away potential clients with a Google AdWords campaign.  The K&P complaint filed in Fulton County Superior Court claims Atlanta’s Kaufman Law is violating K&P’s trademark and “misleading” the public by purchasing K&P’s name through Google. The service allows businesses to bid for specific search words and terms, then place clickable links above the resulting search pages “in a manner that makes Kaufman’s advertisements appear as related to or derived from K&P.”

  7. Criminal Justice

    DALIA DIPPOLITO WANTS U.S. SUPREME COURT TO REVIEW MURDER-FOR-HIRE CASE

    Sun Sentinel | Article | December 03, 2019

    Dalia Dippolito, whose murder-for-hire case got her international attention and a 16-year prison sentence, is appealing to the U.S. Supreme Court. Dippolito’s attorneys filed their request Tuesday [Dec. 3] asking the justices to decide whether her defense — a disputed claim of being set up by the police — should be presented for a jury’s consideration.  This comes three months after the Florida Supreme Court turned her down. She is accused of hiring a police officer posing as a hitman to kill her newlywed husband.

  8. Civil Justice

    ETHICS BOARD COULD SUSPEND JULIE MEADOWS-KEEFE OVER LAWSUIT; ATTORNEY SAYS THAT’S RETALIATION

    Tallahassee Democrat | Article | December 04, 2019

    A lawsuit has been filed against Tallahassee’s Independent Ethics Board by its own ethics officer Julie Meadows-Keef.  Her Nov. 15 lawsuit alleges that Tallahassee Mayor John Dailey retaliated against her and pushed to get her fired and Ethics Board members did nothing to stop him. As board members on Monday [Dec. 2] discussed hiring an outside law firm to represent them in the civil case, Meadows-Keefe excused herself from the conversation. The board was served on Tuesday [Dec. 3] and has 20 days to file its response.

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