The Florida Bar

Daily News Summary

  1. Home
  2. News & Events
  3. Daily News Summary

Daily News Summary

The purpose of this summary provided by the Communications Department of The Florida Bar is to present media coverage that may be of interest to members. Opinions expressed in the articles are attributable solely to the authors. The Florida Bar does not adopt or endorse any opinions expressed below. For information on previous articles, please contact the publishing newspaper directly.

May 22, 2020

  1. Judiciary

    NEW ORDERS LAUNCH REMOTE CIVIL JURY TRIAL PILOT PROGRAM, SET NEW HEALTH SAFETY MEASURES

    The Florida Bar | Article | May 22, 2020

    Florida Supreme Court Chief Justice Charles Canady issued two orders late Thursday [May 21] one creating a new pilot program for civil jury trials to be held using remote technology and one establishing health and safety precautions to be used in Phase 2 of the expansion of court operations. Under the pilot program, the statewide COVID-19 Workgroup will develop requirements and will select up to five Florida trial circuits to participate. Trials will only be civil, non-criminal cases, and all parties must consent to participate in the pilot.

  2. The Florida Bar

    MILITARY SPOUSES MAY WORK AS CERTIFIED LEGAL INTERNS WHILE AWAITING CHARACTER AND FITNESS REVIEW

    The Florida Bar | Article | May 22, 2020

    The Supreme Court on May 21 approved an amendment to Chapter 21 of Bar rules, which allows military spouses who are licensed in other jurisdictions, but stationed in Florida, to practice for up to five years in the state, under supervision of a Bar member, without taking the bar exam. The amendment allows military spouses who are lawyers to work as certified legal interns while they wait to pass the Florida Board of Bar Examiners character and fitness review.

  3. Judiciary

    FLORIDA SUPREME COURT REVERSES ITSELF AGAIN ON DEATH PENALTY LEGAL ISSUE

    Tampa Bay Times | Article | May 21, 2020

    Harry Franklin Phillips, who shot a Miami parole officer to death in 1982, was hoping to get his death sentence reversed by convincing the courts he is intellectually disabled. But the Florida Supreme Court, backtracking on its own case decided only years ago, on Thursday [May 21] ruled that Phillips isn’t  eligible. The court ruled that an earlier decision allowing for the broadening of who can be deemed intellectually disabled — generally someone with an IQ of 70 or under — does not apply “retroactively” to older cases such as Phillips’.

  4. Judiciary

    MIAMI-DADE’S NEW COURTHOUSE VISION: A PREVIEW OF WHAT’S TO COME

    Daily Business Review | Article | May 21, 2020

    Miami-Dade Chief Circuit Judge Bertila Soto and Civil Administrative Judge Jennifer Bailey visited a warehouse in Doral, with a wooden mockup of the to-be-featured ceremonial courtroom and two sizes of the planned jury trial courtrooms. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, Soto said the judges are considering changing or updating certain interior spaces to accommodate for planned social distancing. The structure, estimated to cost $267 million, will replace the almost 100-year-old Miami-Dade Civil Courthouse.

  5. Judiciary

    AS PBC GRADUALLY REOPENS, COURTS PREPARE FOR RETURN

    Palm Beach Post | Article | May 22, 2020

    Before Florida Supreme Court Chief Justice Charles T. Canady announced this month another delay for jury trials, this time until July, Palm Beach County Chief Judge Krista Marx said her district was ready to jump back. In a recent interview with The Palm Beach Post, Marx said that whenever the courts reopen, her main focus will remain on how to keep everyone safe as the courts phase back in.

  6. Civil Justice

    MANY SOUTH FLORIDA RENTERS PROTECTED FROM EVICTIONS UNTIL LATE AUGUST

    Sun Sentinel | Article | May 21, 2020

    Even though Gov. Ron DeSantis’ statewide eviction moratorium expires June 2, chief judges of South Florida’s three judicial circuits — the 17th, 11th and 15th — issued recent rulings affirming federal protections for as many as a quarter million tenants in South Florida who fail to pay their rent. The orders require landlords seeking evictions for nonpayment to disclose to the court whether their tenants receive federal rent subsidies, or whether the tenants’ apartments are being purchased with federally-backed mortgage loans.

  7. Civil Justice

    FLORIDA RULING DEMONSTRATES POTENTIAL PITFALL FOR PLAINTIFFS BRINGING MEDICAL MALPRACTICE LAWSUITS

    Daily Business Review | Article | May 21, 2020

    On Wednesday [May 20] the Fourth District Court of Appeal threw out Roberto Cortes’ lawsuit against a hospital and behavioral treatment center because it didn’t comply with the strict requirements of Florida’s medical malpractice statute. Last year, Cortes’ daughter Daniela Cortes died of “a severe withdrawal syndrome,” allegedly because she was suddenly cut off from seven medications that Memorial Regional Hospital had prescribed for her stay at a facility owned by Henderson Behavioral Health Inc.

  8. Civil Justice

    JUDGE DENIES MOTION TO END COUNTY MASK REQUIREMENT

    The Gainesville Sun | Article | May 21, 2020

    Weeks after Justin Green, the owner of a plant nursery in Newberry, sued Alachua County and the governor over the county’s mandatory mask order, Eighth Judicial Circuit Judge Donna Keim Thursday [May 21] denied the man’s request for an emergency injunction to end the policy. Green’s attorneys argued that the masks violated his free speech and right to privacy, according to court documents.

  9. Criminal Justice

    GRAND JURY CHARGES FLORIDA MAN WITH THREATENING TO SPREAD CORONAVIRUS

    NBC6 South Florida | Article | May 22, 2020

    A federal grand jury in Tampa returned an indictment Wednesday [May 20] charging James Jamal Curry, 31, with perpetrating a biological weapon hoax for coughing on and spitting at police officers while claiming to be infected with the coronavirus. He had previously been charged by criminal complaint last month. He faces up to five years in federal prison if convicted. Law enforcement obtained a warrant to test Curry for COVID-19, and the result was negative.

Recent Archives: