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Daily News Summary

The purpose of this summary provided by the Communications Department of The Florida Bar is to present media coverage that may be of interest to members. Opinions expressed in the articles are attributable solely to the authors. The Florida Bar does not adopt or endorse any opinions expressed below. For information on previous articles, please contact the publishing newspaper directly.

May 26, 2020

  1. The Florida Bar

    ANDRIACCHI TO LEAD SEVENTH CIRCUIT’S GAL PROGRAM

    The Florida Bar | Article | May 26, 2020

    The Daily News Summary features Florida Bar News articles on the recognition of student writers, a new Palm Beach County Florida Association for Women Lawyers president and a new leader for the Seventh Circuit’s Guardian ad Litem’s program. Chris Andriacchi, a litigator with 45 years’ experience, is the new managing attorney for the Guardian ad Litem Program of the Seventh Circuit, leading the advocacy for approximately 1,500 abused and neglected children in Flagler, Putnam, St. Johns, and Volusia counties.

  2. Judiciary

    RON DESANTIS ANNOUNCES TWO MORE APPOINTMENTS TO THE FLORIDA SUPREME COURT

    Tampa Bay Times | Article | May 26, 2020

    Gov. Ron DeSantis announced Tuesday [May 26] he has made his picks for the two vacancies on the Florida Supreme Court: Renatha Francis and John Couriel. Francis, a judge for the 15th Judicial Circuit Court won’t be able to take her seat on the bench until September. Couriel is a private litigator and one time prosecutor at the U.S. Department of Justice. Both of the new appointments are from the Miami-Dade area. They will replace two justices, Barbara Lagoa and Robert Luck, who were initially appointed by DeSantis to the Florida Supreme Court. Last year, Lagoa and Luck were selected to serve on the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals by President Donald Trump.

  3. Legal Profession

    FLORIDA NEWEST STATE AIMING TO BOOST ACCESS TO LEGAL SERVICES

    Bloomberg Law | Article | May 26, 2020

    Florida will be the latest state to dig into a range of possible regulatory reforms through its Special Committee to Improve the Delivery of Legal Services, sanctioned by the Supreme Court of Florida late last year. The 10-lawyer committee, set to hold its first meeting June 15, will tackle issues such as fee splitting, and the regulation of nonlawyer providers of limited legal services. “People are becoming more open to what we can and should be doing,” said Florida Bar President John Stewart, whose one-year term ends June 19. Stewart will serve as the committee’s chair through the completion of its final report, set to be issued to the court on or before July 1, 2021.

  4. Civil Justice

    FLORIDA LAW RESTRICTING FELON VOTING IS UNCONSTITUTIONAL, JUDGE RULES

    New York Times | Article | May 24, 2020

    A Florida law requiring people with felony convictions to pay court fines and fees before they can register to vote is unconstitutional, Judge Robert L. Hinkle of the U.S. District Court in Tallahassee ruled on Sunday [May 24], declaring that such a requirement would amount to a poll tax and discriminate against felons who cannot afford to pay. The judge granted a permanent injunction to civil rights groups that challenged the law as discriminatory for the majority of felons, many of whom are indigent. The state is expected to appeal. However, much of Sunday’s ruling is built on a previous ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit in Atlanta, which would hear any appeal.

  5. Judiciary

    JNC DOES NOT HAVE TO RELEASE FLORIDA JUDGE’S FEDERAL APPLICATION AFTER 11TH CIRCUIT TOSSES LAWSUIT

    Daily Business Review | Article | May 22, 2020

    Joshua Statton of the nonprofit government watchdog group Florida for Transparency filed a lawsuit in February to compel the Florida Federal Judicial Nominating Commission to supply a copy of a federal judge’s application documents. But Statton’s request has faltered before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit, which found there was no need for the commission to comply with a Freedom of Information Act request. Statton alleged U.S. District Judge Thomas P. Barber in the Middle District of Florida had made false representations and material omissions in the documents, according to the ruling. Barber declined to comment on the case and is bound by a code of ethics that can prohibit judges from defending themselves from such allegations.

  6. Civil Justice

    DO DETAINEE TRANSFERS INCREASE COVID-19 CASES? JUDGE ORDERS ICE TO DISCLOSE DATA

    Miami Herald | Article | May 25, 2020

    U.S. District Judge Marcia G. Cooke in Miami has ordered U.S. immigration officials to disclose whether the government’s practice of transferring detainees from one facility to another has contributed to a worrying spike in coronavirus cases inside three South Florida detention centers. At a hearing last week, federal magistrate Judge Jonathan Goodman, who is presiding over the case with Judge Cooke, asked ICE to “voluntarily produce” its transfer data for the last month to the court.

  7. Tech Tip

    THE COMPLETE ZOOM GUIDE: FROM BASIC HELP TO ADVANCED TRICKS

    ZDNet | Article | May 15, 2020

    Video conferencing has never been so critical to our work and personal lives. Here’s everything you need to make your meetings more productive.

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