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Daily News Summary

The purpose of this summary provided by the Communications Department of The Florida Bar is to present media coverage that may be of interest to members. Opinions expressed in the articles are attributable solely to the authors. The Florida Bar does not adopt or endorse any opinions expressed below. For information on previous articles, please contact the publishing newspaper directly.

June 26, 2020

  1. The Florida Bar

    OLDT STEPS DOWN AS FOUNDATION PRESIDENT

    The Florida Bar | Article | June 26, 2020

    The Daily News Summary features Florida Bar News articles on IOTA study subcommittees, support for the PACE Center for Girls and The Florida Bar Foundation president stepping down. A day after accepting the gavel to run the organization for the coming year and a week before he formally began his term, Tom Oldt resigned as president of The Florida Bar Foundation. The Foundation’s Executive Committee met on June 24 and extended the term of outgoing President Hala Sandridge.

  2. The Florida Bar

    TANNER SWORN IN AS PRESIDENT-ELECT OF THE FLORIDA BAR

    Jacksonville Daily Record | Article | June 26, 2020

    Michael Tanner was sworn in June 19 by state Supreme Court Chief Justice Charles Canady as president-elect of The Florida Bar at the Bar’s Virtual General Assembly. Tanner, a partner in the Gunster law firm’s Jacksonville and Tallahassee offices, will lead the state organization in the 2021-22 Bar year.

  3. Judiciary

    FLORIDA SUPREME COURT AFFIRMS GOVERNOR’S EMERGENCY POWERS DURING PANDEMIC

    WUFT | Article | June 25, 2020

    Florida’s Supreme Court ruled Thursday [June 25] against William Abramson of Lantana who challenged the authority of Gov. Ron DeSantis to issue virus-related shutdown orders. The decision affirms that the governor has broad emergency powers under state law to protect public health and safety. The lawsuit went straight to Florida’s Supreme Court because it was filed as a writ of quo warranto, a direct challenge to the governor about whether he acted outside the scope of his authority.

  4. Civil Justice

    FEDERAL JUDGE CONSIDERS HAVING ICE JAILS INSPECTED BY THE COURT FOLLOWING LIVE TESTIMONY

    Miami Herald | Article | June 25, 2020

    During a virtual court hearing held Thursday [June 25] via Zoom, U.S. District Judge Marcia G. Cooke told U.S. Customs and Immigration Enforcement that she would soon be deciding whether to assign a “special master” or “professional observer” with the aim of finding out if her court orders —designed to prevent the spread of the coronavirus — have been followed. This development comes after detainees gave live, scathing testimony Thursday about the deteriorating conditions behind bars as COVID-19 rapidly spreads.

  5. Civil Justice

    DIVIDED SOUTH FLORIDA COURT RULES ON FREE-SPEECH ISSUES IN SOCIAL MEDIA ROW BETWEEN SENATOR AND SEX OFFENDER

    Daily Business Review | Article | June 25, 2020

    A stalking injunction blocking Derek Logue, a convicted child molester from contacting, writing about or going within 1,000 feet of Florida Sen. Lauren Book came before the Fourth District Court of Appeal for the second time Wednesday [June 24]. The majority found public social media posts not sent directly to someone can rise to the level of stalking under Florida law if the intent is for word to get out to the victim, but ruled that the case didn’t meet the mark. Analyzing the incidents, the appellate panel found the injunction impeded Logue’s constitutional right to free speech.

  6. Judiciary

    ORANGE, OSCEOLA COURTS PULL BACK REOPENING AFTER ATTORNEYS TEST POSITIVE FOR COVID-19

    Orlando Sentinel | Article | June 25, 2020

    Courts in Orange and Osceola Counties will limit operations again starting Monday [June 29] after Orange-Osceola Public Defender Robert Wesley confirmed five of his employees, including four attorneys and one support staff member, tested positive within the past week-and-a-half for COVID-19. The courts will be going back to the “Phase 1″ restrictions mandated by the Florida Supreme Court, under which “in-person contact is inadvisable, court facilities are effectively closed to the public, and in-person proceedings are rare,” according to an administrative order.

  7. Legislative

    FLORIDA LEGISLATURE MAKES WELCOME CHANGES TO APPELLATE JURISDICTION

    JDSupra | Article | June 25, 2020

    Effective Jan. 1, 2021, circuit courts will no longer have jurisdiction over civil and criminal appeals from county courts. On June 20, Gov. DeSantis signed into law Senate Bill 1392, which, among other things, significantly modifies appellate jurisdiction in Florida’s state courts. Jurisdiction over county court civil and criminal appeals will rest exclusively with the district courts of appeal. Circuit courts will continue to have jurisdiction over appeals from final administrative orders of local government code enforcement boards and other reviews and appeals as may be expressly provided by law.

  8. Judiciary

    JUDGES TYPICALLY GET RE-ELECTED AUTOMATICALLY. BUT TWO IN HILLSBOROUGH FACE CHALLENGERS.

    Tampa Bay Times | Article | June 25, 2020

    It’s a rule that Florida judges must run for re-election every six years. But in Hillsborough County, most of the time, no one bothers to challenge the incumbents.  Except for this year when Circuit Judges Steven Scott Stephens and Michael Scionti face challengers. Both judges accept it as part of the reality of holding elected office. Judge Stephens’ opponent is Tampa lawyer Wendy DePaul and Judge Michael Scionti’s opponent is Ashley Ivanov, a Lithia attorney.

  9. Civil Justice

    RULING ON TEST CASE SPELLS OUT FATE OF FLORIDA’S RED-LIGHT CAMERAS

    Daily Business Review | Article | June 25, 2020

    The Third District Court of Appeal overruled a decision Wednesday [June 24], stating that each city gave instructions to its red-light vendor regarding the contractual task of sorting all the camera images that are collected. The appellate court found that there could be variations in traffic enforcement levels resulting from different cities employing different benchmarks as to which violations would get ticketed but that those variances do not violate the state law  requiring that traffic laws be administered in a uniform manner.

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