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Daily News Summary

The purpose of this summary provided by the Communications Department of The Florida Bar is to present media coverage that may be of interest to members. Opinions expressed in the articles are attributable solely to the authors. The Florida Bar does not adopt or endorse any opinions expressed below. For information on previous articles, please contact the publishing newspaper directly.

September 10, 2020

  1. The Florida Bar

    DESANTIS DEFENDS FRANCIS SUPREME COURT APPOINTMENT

    The Florida Bar | Article | September 10, 2020

    Gov. Ron DeSantis rallied support for his contested appointment of Fifteenth Circuit Judge Renatha Francis to the Supreme Court at a Sept. 9 news conference that included statements from Francis, former Bar President Eugene Pettis, and several South Florida Black politicians. The news conference came before DeSantis’s office filed a response just before midnight Wednesday [Sept. 9] to the Supreme Court’s Sept. 8 show cause order on why it should not block Francis’s appointment and order the governor to select someone else. Among other things, DeSantis contended in the response, that because the court had ruled it was too late to challenge the Judicial Nominating Commission’s inclusion of Francis in the original nominee list, it was improper to order that her name be removed now if the governor is ordered to pick again.

  2. Legal Profession

    BILLIONS MAY BE ON THE TABLE IF MORE STATES CHANGE OWNERSHIP RULES. WILL FLORIDA BE NEXT?

    Daily Business Review | Article | September 09, 2020

    The Florida Bar, the third-largest state bar in the country, may be the next state allowing people without a law license to own law firms. John Stewart, The Florida Bar’s immediate past president, is leading its special committee to improve the delivery of legal services. The committee’s express purpose is to look at how the legal needs of Florida’s lower- and middle-income residents, as well as its small businesses, can be better served by the state’s legal industry. Among its six areas of study, the committee will look at Rule 5.4, which forbids nonlawyers from holding equity in a law firm and governs referrals and attorney advertising.

  3. Judiciary

    JONES DAY LAWYER NOT QUALIFIED FOR U.S. TRIAL COURT

    Bloomberg Law | Article | September 09, 2020

    Jones Day attorney Kathryn Kimball Mizelle, nominated by President Donald Trump to the federal district court covering Jacksonville, isn’t qualified to serve as a trial court judge because of her limited experience as an attorney, the American Bar Association said. The ABA typically requires a minimum of 12 years’ experience to rate a nominee qualified. Mizelle was admitted to The Florida Bar in September 2012, the ABA said, which “represents a rather marked departure from the 12-year minimum.”

  4. Judiciary

    6 POLK CANDIDATES NOMINATED TO FILL CIRCUIT JUDGE VACANCY

    Lakeland Ledger | Article | September 09, 2020

    Three Polk County judges and three private lawyers have been nominated to replace Circuit Judge John Stargel, who’s been appointed to the 2nd District Court of Appeal in Lakeland. After interviewing 15 applicants, the Judicial Nominating Commission for the Bartow-based Tenth Judicial Circuit selected Polk County Judges Mary Catherine Green, Hope M. Pattey and Jennifer A. Swenson; and attorneys Kevin M. Kohl, Brandon J. Rafool and John C. Waters.

  5. Judiciary

    UNION SAYS JUDGES SHOULD STEP ASIDE FROM SCHOOLS CASE

    CBS 12 | Article | September 09, 2020

    The Florida Education Association and other plaintiffs challenging a state order to reopen schools requested Wednesday [Sept. 9] that two appellate judges step aside from the case because Gov. Ron DeSantis could consider them for an appointment to the Florida Supreme Court. Attorneys for the plaintiffs filed a motion requesting that First District Court of Appeal Judges Lori Rowe and Timothy Osterhaus disqualify themselves from the closely watched legal fight over a July 6 state order requiring schools to reopen classrooms in August amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

  6. Civil Justice

    THIS MIAMI-DADE CITY HAD A BAN ON ‘SAGGY PANTS.’ THE LAW WILL BE REPEALED

    Miami Herald | Article | September 09, 2020

    It was one of South Florida’s most unusual, constitutionally questionable laws: a ban on wearing “saggy pants” at city buildings and parks throughout Opa-locka, later expanded to include all public spaces. Thirteen years later, the Opa-locka City Commission voted Wednesday [Sept. 9] evening, 4-1, to repeal both the original 2007 legislation and a 2013 ordinance that said women, not just men, could receive civil citations for wearing pants that exposed their undergarments.

  7. Judiciary

    SERIES OF SNAGS ADDS FOUR MONTHS TO MIAMI-DADE COURTHOUSE CONSTRUCTION

    Miami Today | Article | September 09, 2020

    A July report from Plenary Justice Miami, the development team behind the Miami-Dade courthouse project, notes several setbacks that have pushed back the building’s opening from January 2024 to May 2024. Those problems include a six-week delay in completing project designs to reflect changes Miami-Dade County requested and changes related to sewer lines, power conduits and a water cooling line. On May 16, 2024, tentatively, the building will be ready for occupancy.

  8. Legal Profession

    MORE LAW FIRMS ARE MOVING TO MAKE ELECTION DAY A PAID HOLIDAY

    ABA Journal | Article | September 09, 2020

    As a growing number of large law firms offer their employees paid time off to participate in the Nov. 3 presidential election, the legal community may wonder: Is this a one-time holiday or a lasting trend? The American Lawyer publication poses the question in a recent report stating firm leaders are considering Election Day holidays but have not made official announcements.

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