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Daily News Summary

The purpose of this summary provided by the Communications Department of The Florida Bar is to present media coverage that may be of interest to members. Opinions expressed in the articles are attributable solely to the authors. The Florida Bar does not adopt or endorse any opinions expressed below. For information on previous articles, please contact the publishing newspaper directly.

May 09, 2022

  1. The Florida Bar

    ‘JUDICIAL NOTICE’ OF WEB MAPPING SERVICES BILL HITS THE GOVERNOR’S DESK

    The Florida Bar | Article | May 09, 2022

    The Legislature has sent Gov. Ron DeSantis SB 634, which would authorize courts to take “judicial notice” of information gleaned from internet mapping services. The measure by Sen. Jennifer Bradley (R-Orange Park) was delivered May 6. Bradley said the measure would help conserve judicial resources by making it easier to admit evidence provided by widely accepted internet services, such as Google Maps. Gov. DeSantis has until May 20 to act.

  2. Legal Discipline

    DENIED: NO EMERGENCY SUSPENSION FOR THIS SOUTH FLORIDA ATTORNEY

    Daily Business Review | Article | May 06, 2022

    In a rare ruling, the Florida Supreme Court denied The Florida Bar’s emergency petition to suspend Miami attorney Bruce Jacobs who is the subject of multiple pending ethics complaints regarding his use of unconventional tactics in advocating for homeowners against large institutional banks. Jacobs’ attorneys in his disciplinary proceedings filed a motion to dismiss The Florida Bar’s complaint under the Anti-SLAPP statute, arguing that Jacobs exhibited free speech by preserving the record on appeal and asserting that his clients’ homes are being taken without due process.

  3. Judiciary

    APPEALS COURT REINSTATES FLORIDA ELECTION LAW CRITICIZED AS BLACK VOTER SUPPRESSION

    Tallahassee Democrat | Article | May 06, 2022

    A panel judges of from the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday [May 6] reinstated key sections of a 2021 state election law, overturning a lower court ruling that the legislation intentionally discriminated against Black voters. The panel determined that the next statewide election is too soon for the courts to interfere with election laws, citing precedent known as the Purcell principle. The ruling also took issue with Chief U.S. District Judge Mark Walker’s finding that the legislation was part of a pattern of Black voter suppression.

  4. Legal Profession

    FROM DEATH PENALTY TO COURT DOCKETS, JUDGES NEED CONTINUING EDUCATION TOO

    Sun-Sentinel | Article | May 07, 2022

    Florida’s criminal court judges are required to complete 30 hours of judicial education, provided by the state’s Office of Court Administration, every three years, with the most rigorous training being reserved for cases calling for the death penalty. “About 80 percent of cases considered by the Supreme Court are death penalty cases,” said Broward Chief Administrative Judge Jack Tuter. Three Broward judges will be taking their death penalty refresher course on May 19, including Elizabeth Scherer, who is currently presiding over jury selection in the death penalty trial for confessed Parkland school shooter Nikolas Cruz.

  5. Legal Profession

    WILLIAM SHEPPARD: A LIFE’S MISSION TO PROTECT THE DISADVANTAGED AND VULNERABLE

    Jacksonville Daily Record | Article | May 05, 2022

    At the 2022 Jacksonville Bar Association Law Day luncheon on May 4, the Jacksonville Daily Record presented its inaugural Lifetime Achievement Award to local attorney William Sheppard, who died earlier this year. Future recipients will receive the “William J. Sheppard Lifetime Achievement Award” to reflect his career accomplishments, which include prison reform, the legalization of same-sex marriage in Florida, and forcing the city to end decades-old discriminatory employment policies used against black firefighters.

  6. Civil Justice

    TAMPA EVENT HELPS PEOPLE GET THEIR LICENSE BACK — AND THEIR FREEDOM

    Tampa Bay Times | Article | May 06, 2022

    Thursday [May 5] was the first day of Operation Green Light, an annual event hosted by the Hillsborough County Clerk’s Office to help people with traffic violations and suspended licenses pay off fines and get their licenses reinstated. Similar events are held in each of Florida’s counties, but the format varies. In Hillsborough, cases are reviewed ahead of time, and qualifying candidates — those who are deemed not to be a threat to public safety — appear one-by-one before Florida’s 13th Judicial Circuit Court Judge Paul Jeske over three days, in hopes of having fines reduced, charges waived and the ability to drive restored.

  7. Legal Profession

    MAKE MONEY MONDAY: SHOULD LAWYERS USE TIKTOK?

    My Shingle | Article | May 02, 2022

    TikTok’s exponential growth in the past four years has made it a tempting marketing tool for many lawyers and law firms, especially after seeing the examples of early-adopting lawyers who’ve gone viral with several hundred thousand followers or more. However, as attorney and avid TikTok user Carolyn Elefant explains, it is important for aspiring TikTok lawyers to first determine whether this is a good investment of their limited time and energy. In an effort to help other lawyers decide whether TikTok is right for them, Elefant provides some questions to consider and lessons she has learned in her time on TikTok.

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