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Daily News Summary

The purpose of this summary provided by the Communications Department of The Florida Bar is to present media coverage that may be of interest to members. Opinions expressed in the articles are attributable solely to the authors. The Florida Bar does not adopt or endorse any opinions expressed below. For information on previous articles, please contact the publishing newspaper directly.

June 20, 2022

  1. The Florida Bar

    PROFESSIONALISM – YOU KNOW IT WHEN YOU SEE IT

    The Florida Bar | Article | June 20, 2022

    Florida lawyers will have a rare opportunity to explore the meaning of professionalism, and how it interacts with the Rules of Professional Conduct, at the 2022 Masters Seminar on Ethics on June 24 at Annual Florida Bar Convention. The seminar will feature four ethics-themed panels – “Bar Grievances and You: How to Avoid Them and What to do if You Get One,” “Technology,” “A Judicial Roundtable on Ethics,” and “Celebrating the Professionalism of Being a Lawyer.” Attendees can earn four hours of General CLE; Ethics 2.0; Technology 1.0; Professionalism 1.0.

  2. Judiciary

    DESANTIS URGES GRAND JURY PROBE INTO IMMIGRATION

    Tampa Bay Times | Article | June 17, 2022

    Gov. Ron DeSantis on Friday [June 17] asked the Florida Supreme Court to impanel a statewide grand jury to investigate whether families, local governments and international criminal organizations are conspiring to illegally bring migrants to Florida. It’s a rare use of a statewide grand jury, which has only been impaneled 20 times in more than 40 years. If the court approves the grand jury, it would be the second time DeSantis has had a request for a grand jury accepted. This time, DeSantis is making the case that the state has a “public interest” in having a grand jury examine whether Florida needs to take further action on immigration.

  3. Judiciary

    ON LAST DAY OF CANDIDATE QUALIFYING, APPELLATE COURT RULES GOV. DESANTIS’ MAP WILL STAND FOR 2022 ELECTIONS

    Florida Politics | Article | June 18, 2022

    The First District Court of Appeal formally reversed a lower court decision to block Florida’s new congressional map this year. The ruling came the same day the clock ran out on candidates qualifying to run for Congress representing the state. The court ruled Leon Circuit Court Judge Layne Smith strayed from the law when he ordered a different map be used for the 2022 elections.

  4. Civil Justice

    RULING OPENS DOOR TO COREY JONES’ FAMILY SUING PALM BEACH GARDENS OVER RIGHTS VIOLATION IN HIS DEATH

    Palm Beach Post | Article | June 17, 2022

    On Friday [June 17], U.S. Judge Robert Scola took preliminary steps to allow the family of Corey Jones to seek millions from Palm Beach Gardens for not properly training an officer who fatally shot the Boynton Beach drummer after his car broke down seven years ago. In a 10-page ruling, Judge Scola said the family could continue to pursue the city for violating Jones’ constitutional rights by not properly training Officer Nouman Raja. If the decision survives, attorneys could pursue plans to ask the city to pay Jones’ family far more than the $2 million it has in insurance coverage. Under the state’s sovereign immunity laws, the amount of money governments can be forced to pay for wrongdoing are capped. However, those caps don’t apply if a city or other government agency is accused of violating someone’s constitutional rights.

  5. Civil Justice

    LAWSUIT: DCF ACCUSED OF KEEPING KIDS FROM RELATIVES, ADOPTING THEM TO SYSTEM-CONNECTED STRANGERS

    WFTS Tampa Bay | Article | June 17, 2022

    Four Florida families filed a lawsuit on Wednesday [June 15] in a Tallahassee federal court alleging that employees within the state’s foster care system bypassed state and federal laws so that workers could keep children from being placed with biological relatives and, instead, place them with system-connected people seeking children of their own. The lawsuit accuses leaders of Florida’s Department of Children and Families (DCF) and several other state foster care organizations of fabricating evidence, hiding and withholding key information, creating false abuse allegations, or ignoring state and federal family laws.

  6. Civil Justice

    NEW FLORIDA RULING ALLOWS WORKERS TO PLEAD DISCRIMINATION AGAINST SMALL EMPLOYERS

    Daily Business Review | Article | June 17, 2022

    The Third District Court of Appeal ruled that Miami-Dade employers who have at least five employees can face a cause of action from one of their workers. This ruling stems from dispute between AutoZone Investment Corp. and one of its former employees, Andre White, who claims he was fired after making a complaint about co-workers who he says verbally abused due to his sexual orientation. Regardless of the ultimate outcome for White, this appellate ruling is a gamechanger for those alleging discrimination claims against Miami-Dade employers, if the business fits the same staffing criteria.

  7. Judiciary

    WHY JUDGES GET LIFETIME JOBS

    Palm Beach Post | Column | June 19, 2022

    Kevin Wagner, a noted constitutional scholar and political science professor at Florida Atlantic University, writes: “Judges are expected to follow the law which can result in unpopular decisions. The purpose of giving federal judges such extraordinary job security is to remove them from political pressures. This is intended to help ensure that the decisions they make are guided by law and judgment rather than trying to placate political interests to save their job. A judge or justice must be seen as fair and independent . . . There is some question to whether lifetime tenure removes the politics or adds to it. Supreme Court Justices can serve decades, so every modern vacancy has become a highly partisan contest, since winning or losing the nomination battle can have a significant effect on the direction of the nation. Indeed, the very length of the term can lead to questions.”

  8. Legal Profession

    BEN CRUMP STORY ‘CIVIL’ PREMIERES AT FSU LAW AND NETFLIX THIS JUNETEENTH

    Florida Politics | Article | June 19, 2022

    Tallahassee-based lawyer Ben Crump is already a nationally renowned civil rights attorney, and his story went global when the documentary about him premiered on Netflix on Sunday, June 19—or Juneteenth. Netflix followed Crump for almost 18 months at the height of the pandemic as the lawyer fought for the families of Black men and women, like George Floyd, who died during interactions with police.

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