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Daily News Summary

The purpose of this summary provided by the Communications Department of The Florida Bar is to present media coverage that may be of interest to members. Opinions expressed in the articles are attributable solely to the authors. The Florida Bar does not adopt or endorse any opinions expressed below. For information on previous articles, please contact the publishing newspaper directly.

August 01, 2022

  1. The Florida Bar

    IF YOU’VE NOT DONE SO, NOW IS A GOOD TIME TO PAY YOUR ANNUAL BAR FEES

    The Florida Bar | Article | August 01, 2022

    The Florida Bar’s annual fee season is well underway with the traditional first option of paying online by signing into The Florida Bar Member Portal and clicking the “Pay My Fees” button. It is the quickest and easiest way to pay your annual fees, elect voluntary section memberships, and stay in compliance with Bar rules for trust accounting and pro bono reporting. For alternate payment methods select “Pay My Fees” to make your selections and answer the required questions, then click on Print/Pay by Mail. Once you’ve done this, call 850-561-5831 or email [email protected] to obtain further instructions. You can also pay by returning the pre-printed statement, which was mailed in June to any member who had not paid electronically by late May.

  2. Legal Discipline

    FLORIDA SUPREME COURT DISBARS LAWYER FOR LOOTING MOTHER’S ESTATE

    Florida Politics | Article | July 30, 2022

    The Florida Supreme Court has disbarred Redington Shores lawyer John Hadsall after discovering he had improperly transferred assets from his mother’s estate for personal use. In a complaint filed last October, The Florida Bar accused Hadsall, who held the power of attorney for his mother, of drafting amendments to his mother’s life estate plan and subsequently taking funds. The court ordered Hadsall to return $383,595 to his mother’s estate, to be paid back in November 2017, but Hadsall failed to do so. He also failed to show that he acted in good faith throughout the transactions, and that his mother acted freely, intelligently, and voluntarily in gifting him funds from her accounts. His actions resulted in his disbarring, becoming one of three recently disbarred Florida lawyers the Bar announced this week.

  3. Judiciary

    COMMITMENT 2022: HOW TO STAY INFORMED ABOUT FLORIDA JUDICIAL CANDIDATES RUNNING FOR ELECTION

    WESH 2 | Article | July 29, 2022

    For a lot of voters, especially those who are not part of the legal community or who may never set foot inside of a courthouse, the idea of selecting judges on the ballot may seem challenging. The Florida Bar has resources to help. It has an online guide for voters that contains a wealth of information about the duties of judges and maps that show which circuits cover your county. The Bar also has bios for Florida Supreme Court justices and District Court judges who are up for merit retention votes in November. Voters can also review candidate self-disclosure statements, posted on the Bar website, that explain their experience. The statements do not indicate a Bar endorsement.

  4. Judiciary

    JUDGE WILL RULE TAMPA BAY CONGRESSIONAL CANDIDATE JERRY TORRES INELIGIBLE

    Tampa Bay Times | Article | July 29, 2022

    Tallahassee Circuit Judge John Cooper said Friday [July 29] he will rule that Republican Jerry Torres is ineligible for the August primary race for Tampa Bay’s 14th Congressional District seat. Democrats sued to keep Torres off the ballot, claiming that his candidate oath wasn’t valid because Torres was in Africa at the time. Torres acknowledged he was in Africa when two versions of his candidate oath were notarized and filed, even though those oaths, notarized in Mississippi, say he was physically present when signing. Attorneys for Torres said they plan to appeal and have already filed a motion to stay Judge Cooper’s ruling, which does not go into effect until the judge signs a written order.

  5. Judiciary

    FORMER DELRAY BEACH WATER INSPECTOR FILES FEDERAL LAWSUIT AGAINST CITY OVER HER FIRING

    Palm Beach Post | Article | July 31, 2022

    Christine Ferrigan, a former Delray Beach Utilities Department employee, filed a federal lawsuit in U.S. District Court on Monday [July 25] against the city, including City Manager Terrence More and Utilities Director Hassan Hadjimiry. Ferrigan’s suit comes only two months after she filed a whistleblower lawsuit against the city, alleging she was terminated for bringing water treatment problems to the state’s attention when her managers were unresponsive to her concerns. Delray Beach has paid more than $1 million, in addition to a $1 million fine, to address longstanding water-treatment problems. In her whistleblower lawsuit, Ferrigan is asking for back pay, attorneys’ fees, and expenses and compensatory damages. She’s also seeking a promotion she was denied or a comparable position.

  6. Legal Profession

    MEET THE 80-YEAR-OLD PROSECUTOR MAKING THE CASE FOR NIKOLAS CRUZ RECEIVING THE DEATH PENALTY

    Palm Beach Post | Article | July 31, 2022

    Broward’s state attorney Michael Satz is no stranger to high profile cases like the Parkland sentencing trial, where he gave a gripping 55-minute opening statement on July 18. Without once relying on notes, a computer screen or any kind of visual aid, Satz flawlessly recited precise details of the case, ranging from the names of dozens of people involved to the serial number on the AR-15 rifle used by the killer. For 44 years he served as Broward County’s state attorney, an elected position that he first attained in 1976. Unlike most state attorneys in large counties, Satz chose to continue prosecuting some of Broward’s most high-profile cases. Among them was the 22-month trial – the longest in Broward County’s history – that ended in 2018 and resulted in life sentences for three men convicted of killing a Broward Sheriff’s deputy.

  7. Judiciary

    DAGGER FOUND IN MAN’S SHOE AT FLORIDA COURTHOUSE, COPS SAY.

    Miami Herald | Article | August 01, 2022

    On Friday, July 29, an 8-inch dagger was found expertly hidden the sole of a man’s shoe as he tried entering a Florida courthouse. According to the Volusia Sheriff’s Office, the man claimed he was wearing someone else’s shoes and didn’t know the knife was in them. Investigators didn’t offer details on why the man was wearing someone else’s shoes. A photo shows the metal knife was large enough to impede flexibility and make walking uncomfortable. Investigators say the man is living under a risk protection order(RPO) filed by the sheriff’s office, which temporarily removes firearms and ammunition from the possession of someone who poses a danger to themselves or others. The order followed a 2021 incident in which the man fired a shotgun at people who didn’t exist, according to the sheriff’s office.

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