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Daily News Summary

The purpose of this summary provided by the Communications Department of The Florida Bar is to present media coverage that may be of interest to members. Opinions expressed in the articles are attributable solely to the authors. The Florida Bar does not adopt or endorse any opinions expressed below. For information on previous articles, please contact the publishing newspaper directly.

August 10, 2022

  1. The Florida Bar

    WEB-BASED MAPPING SERVICES AMENDMENT MAKING ITS WAY THROUGH THE RULES PROCESS

    The Florida Bar | Article | August 10, 2022

    The Florida Bar Board of Governors has signed off on a proposal that, if approved, would permit Florida courts to take “judicial notice” of information gleaned from widely accepted web-based mapping services, such as Google Earth. At a July 29 meeting in Palm Beach, the board voted without objection to accept the Code and Rules of Evidence Committee proposal to adopt “Chapter 2022-100, Laws of Florida, to the extent it is procedural.” The move follows the Legislature’s approval in March of SB 634 by Sen. Jennifer Bradley, R-Orange Park. Gov. Ron DeSantis signed it May 5. During a Judiciary Committee hearing, Bradley said the measure would increase judicial economy by making it easier to introduce into evidence information that is widely accepted as accurate.

  2. The Florida Bar

    THE FLORIDA BAR PRESIDENT GARY LESSER VISITING THE JBA ON AUG. 25

    Jacksonville Daily Record | Article | August 10, 2022

    Florida Bar President Gary Lesser is scheduled to be the keynote speaker at the Jacksonville Bar Association member luncheon on Aug. 25 at the Marriott Jacksonville Downtown. Lesser is a managing partner of West Palm Beach-based Lesser, Lesser, Landy & Smith, and he was sworn in as the 74th president of The Florida Bar on June 24. Lesser is a longtime leader in the Bar, including serving for more than a decade on its board of governors.

  3. Judiciary

    16 ATTORNEYS GENERAL JOIN FIGHT TO OPPOSE FLORIDA’S ‘DON’T SAY GAY’ LAW

    Daily Business Review | Article | August 09, 2022

    16 attorneys general have formed a coalition in support of a group of teachers, students, parents and organizations who filed a federal challenge to block the enforcement of Florida’s “Parents Rights in Education Act,“ more commonly known by critics as the Don’t Say Gay law. The coalition filed an amicus brief opposing the law, alleging, among other things, that the law censors teachers and will have a significant negative impact on the mental health of LGBTQ+ students.  The attorneys general also express concerns about the costs of litigation every time a parent exercises the right to challenge public school curriculum. “The Act subjects school districts to litigation, injunctions, damages, and attorney fees for any violation of its vague provisions banning certain speech,” the amicus brief claims.

  4. Judiciary

    CAMBRIDGE CHRISTIAN WANTS AN APPEALS COURT TO OVERTURN A RULING AGAINST PRE-GAME PRAYER

    News Service of Florida | Article | August 09, 2022

    Tampa’s Cambridge Christian School filed a brief Monday [Aug. 8] asking the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to find that the Florida High School Athletic Association unconstitutionally prevented a prayer over a stadium loudspeaker before a 2015 high school football championship game. The school is asking the Atlanta-based appeals court to overturn an April ruling by U.S. District Judge Charlene Edwards Honeywell, who said the Florida High School Athletic Association is a “state actor” and did not violate First Amendment rights when it refused to allow a prayer over the public-address system. In the brief, attorneys cited legal precedents, including a June decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in favor of a Bremerton, Wash., high school football coach who lost his job after praying on the field after games.

  5. Judiciary

    FEDS SAY GUNS AND POT A ‘DANGEROUS’ MIX, ASK JUDGE TO DISMISS NIKKI FRIED LAWSUIT

    News Service of Florida | Article | August 09, 2022

    Arguing that the country has a long tradition of viewing intoxication and firearms as a “dangerous” mix, the U.S. Department of Justice on Monday [Aug. 8] asked a federal judge to dismiss a lawsuit filed by Florida Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried challenging federal prohibitions on medical-marijuana patients buying guns. Justice Department court filings, in part, focused on arguments that it is “dangerous to trust regular marijuana users to exercise sound judgment while intoxicated” and that federal firearm restrictions are legally sound. The Biden administration also maintained that restrictions prohibiting marijuana users from purchasing guns are justified because, although medical marijuana has been authorized in Florida, cannabis remains illegal under federal law.

  6. Civil Justice

    FOR FLORIDA TENANTS, FIGHTING EVICTION COMES AT A PRICE

    Tampa Bay Times | Article | August 09, 2022

    Elizabeth Dorado, a lifelong renter in a Tampa neighborhood, may spark an overhaul of Florida’s eviction law, if she wins in court. When her landlord filed to evict her from the house she lived in for 30 years, Dorado discovered that in order to prove that she had always paid her rent on time and kept the property in good shape, she first had to pay $3,000. Under Florida law, tenants accused of failing to pay rent must pay whatever amount their landlord says they owe into the court registry before they can proceed with their eviction case. If the tenant doesn’t pay within five business days, the case defaults in favor of the landlord. In April, her attorney, Ryan Torrens, filed a motion asking the circuit court judge in Hillsborough County to overturn the statute that requires tenants to pay into the registry, providing a rare opportunity to seek a resolution through the courts.

  7. Wellness Wednesday

    THE JOY WORKOUT

    The Florida Bar | Article | August 10, 2022

    Exercise, even in small doses, can improve your mood. Any physical activity can give you an emotional boost, but this workout video leverages psychological research to create a routine specifically designed to make people happy.

     

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