The Florida Bar

Daily News Summary

  1. Home
  2. News & Events
  3. Daily News Summary

Daily News Summary

The purpose of this summary provided by the Communications Department of The Florida Bar is to present media coverage that may be of interest to members. Opinions expressed in the articles are attributable solely to the authors. The Florida Bar does not adopt or endorse any opinions expressed below. For information on previous articles, please contact the publishing newspaper directly.

September 19, 2022

  1. The Florida Bar

    E-FILING UPDATE THAT WILL PROVIDE LINKS TO DOCUMENTS INSTEAD OF PDF ATTACHMENTS WON’T APPLY TO ENTITIES WITH SYSTEM LIMITATIONS

    The Florida Bar | Article | September 19, 2022

    A scheduled update to the E-Filing Portal that will provide links to documents instead of PDF attachments when e-filing will not apply to entities with system limitations, following action by the Florida Courts E-Filing Board of Directors on September 16. Portal Program Manager Carolyn Weber said the exemption was necessary as the planned October 29 system updates will strain those organizations currently without the technology to e-file, including the entire Miami-Dade county criminal division. Furthermore, once those entities do gain access to file electronically, those filers will begin to receive links available through the Portal update. Weber also recommended that the document link be available for 14 business days instead of seven for all filers. Weber said that the new timeframe will provide comfort for filers during the transition process. All three of these recommendations passed with unanimous consent.

  2. Judiciary

    FLORIDA CFO SEEKS TO SCUTTLE UNCLAIMED PROPERTY FIGHT

    News Service of Florida | Article | September 16, 2022

    Florida Chief Financial Officer Jimmy Patronis asked a federal judge Thursday [Sept. 15] to toss out a potential class-action lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of a law that directs the state’s handling of unclaimed property. The lawsuit, filed in July in Tallahassee, alleges that the state does not provide “just compensation,” such as interest, to owners who ultimately claim property. It contends that the system results in an unconstitutional “taking” of property. But attorneys for Patronis filed a motion and a lengthy legal memorandum Thursday urging U.S. District Judge Robert Hinkle to dismiss the case. The legal memorandum Thursday said while the state “holds unclaimed property in safekeeping for the owner, it also gains beneficial use of the property (a collateral benefit) until it is reclaimed. This bears no resemblance to a traditional ‘taking.’”

  3. Judiciary

    FEDERAL JUDGE COULD DECIDE IN WEEKS ON ORDERING NEW MAP FOR JACKSONVILLE CITY COUNCIL SEATS

    Florida Times-Union | Article | September 16, 2022

    Jacksonville City Council contenders and voters will learn in the coming weeks whether U.S. District Judge Marcia Morales Howard will order a new map for council district boundaries after civil rights organizations sued to scrap the lines drawn earlier this year. Judge Howard did not give a specific date for when she would issue her ruling, but she told attorneys to keep Sept. 29 open so they can come back to her courtroom if she needs to ask them another round of questions. Duval County Supervisor of Elections Mike Hogan has said he needs to know by Dec. 16 what the boundaries will be for the 14 council districts that will go on the March ballot.

  4. Civil Justice

    FLORIDA’S RELOCATION PROGRAM CAN CREATE HURDLES FOR IMMIGRATION CASES, MIAMI LAWYERS SAY

    Miami Herald | Article | September 16, 2022

    Miami immigration lawyers say that the state-sponsored transportation of migrants, such as Gov. Ron DeSantis’ relocation of dozens of Venezuelans, can create serious additional hurdles for people navigating the U.S. immigration system. According to South Florida legal experts, the cross-country relocations isolates migrants from their U.S.-based support networks. It could also create challenges for people to comply with their immigration responsibilities as mandated by federal authorities, with repercussions ranging from additional paperwork to detainment and deportation. One of the reasons Homeland Security asks for a destination city when people are released and placed in immigration proceedings is to see if they have a support network that will help them as recently arrived immigrants. But being far away from their intended destinations can make things much harder, especially if people are sent to places where there are no lawyers and groups who offer services to immigrants.

  5. Judiciary

    AFTER ‘BIZARRE’ TWIST, MAN DROPS LEGAL CASE TO BAN BOOKS IN SARASOTA

    WUSF 89.7 | Article | September 19, 2022

    A lawsuit against the Sarasota County School Board alleging sexually explicit material in books was dismissed last month when 12th Judicial Circuit Judge Maryann Olson Boehm ruled plaintiff Robert Louis Craft had no legal basis. Then, the Craft filed legal papers that took aim at the judge herself. Craft is not a resident of Sarasota County and has no children in the school system. His legal filings describe him as a philosopher and constitutional common law expert. Craft filed a motion to reconsider, which was denied. Then, on Sept. 9, he filed a “notice of intent to bring action at law” against the judge herself, accusing her of depriving his rights, of fraud and breach of the peace. The documents cited common law acts and statutes dating back to 1706, 1789 and 1854.

  6. Criminal Justice

    SHOOTER WHO KILLED SISTER OF CARTEL CREW STAR AVOIDS PRISON. DEAD GIRL’S FAMILY OUTRAGED

    Miami Herald | Article | September 16, 2022

    Two years of emotions erupted Thursday [Sept. 15] when Miami-Dade Circuit Judge Lody Jean gave no prison time to Michael McGowan, the confessed killer of a teenage friend at a house party during the height of the pandemic. Judge Jean’s decision to allow McGowan to avoid prison and instead enter a rehabilitation program for first time offenders outraged the family of Giselle “Gigi” Rengifo. They spent Thursday’s hearing seated in a jury box directly across from McGowan and his attorneys and occasionally interrupting the proceedings with angry outbursts. McGowan’s punishment for the killing of Rengifo: a three- or four-month stay in Miami-Dade’s rehabilitative Boot Camp program, followed by two years of community control, which is a more restrictive form of probation. Then McGowan must serve another four years of actual probation.

  7. Civil Justice

    APPEALS COURT REINSTATES LAWSUITS ACCUSING CHIQUITA OF HELPING TERRORISTS KILL COLOMBIANS

    Palm Beach Post | Article | September 16, 2022

    In a stunning reversal, 11th Circuit Court of Appeals this month reinstated claims that Chiquita Brands International and some of its chief executives violated Colombian law and the U.S. Anti-Torture Act by funneling $1.7 million to the Autodefensas Unidas de Colombia (AUC), which the U.S. government designated as a foreign terrorist organization. The decision paves the way for thousands of victims of the bloody rule of the AUC, a right-wing paramilitary group, to get their day in court. More than 7,500 people who lost loved ones during the AUC’s gruesome campaign have filed suit against Chiquita. The suits from around the country were consolidated and are being considered by U.S. District Judge Kenneth Marra in West Palm Beach.

  8. Legal Profession

    HOW THE U.S. CONSTITUTION IMPACTS YOU AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT

    Bradenton Times | Column | September 18, 2022

    Manatee County Clerk of Circuit Court & Comptroller Angel Colonneso writes: “Two hundred and thirty-five years ago, on September 17, the U.S. Constitution was signed, thus creating the system of government, a representative democracy, we have in place to this very day. My office celebrates the signing of the U.S. Constitution every September during Constitution Week, which is September 17-23 this year. . . Our state constitution. . . includes critical government oversight at the local level. In 1838, the Florida Constitution established a Clerk & Comptroller as an independent constitutional officer and elected public trustee, creating a system of checks and balances at the county level. Independent oversight guarantees residents that expenditures are lawful and policies are being followed . . . This Constitution Week, know your Clerk & Comptroller protects the public trust by the constitutional authority granted to oversee the tax dollars of we the people.”

Recent Archives: