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Video: Adoption in Florida

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The Florida Bar FAQs Videos

Adoption in Florida, Linda Goldstein

What is adoption?

What is adoption?

Who may adopt a child?

Who may adopt a child?

How can you find a child to adopt?

How can you find a child to adopt?

What about adopting a child from another state?

What about adopting a child from another state?

What is the Adoption Reunion Registry?

What is the Adoption Reunion Registry?

 

Video Scripts

What is adoption?
Adoption is a legal procedure by which a child becomes part of a family other than that of his or her birth parents through court action. Adoption severs ties with birth parents and relatives and permanently transfers the child into a new family. An adult may also be adopted. The procedure for adults is similar to adopting a child but considerably simpler.

Who may adopt a child?
To adopt, adults must live and work in the state, be of good character and have the ability to nurture and provide for a child. Single adults, as well as married couples, may adopt. A stepparent may adopt his or her spouse’s children.

How can you find a child to adopt?
To find a child to adopt check with an agency or attorney who handles placements. Agencies may be private or public. All private agencies are licensed by the Department of Children and Families. The only public child-placing agency is DCF. In private agency and attorney or intermediary placements, the proposed adoption must be reported to the court.

What about adopting a child from another state?
Before adopting a child from another state, approval is needed from the Department of Children and Families for both states.

What is the Adoption Reunion Registry?
The Adoption Reunion Registry is a listing maintained by the Department of Children and Families for the benefit of adopted children. To be on the registry, a signed statement from the birth parents at or about the time they consent to the adoption must be submitted.

If the birth parent decides to be listed, then that parent’s identity may be released to the child after he or she turns 18. If the birth parent elects not to be on the registry, no information will be given to the child. A birth parent may change his or her mind concerning the registry as many times as necessary until the child reaches the age of 18.