The Florida Bar

Judicial Independence: Benchmarks Constitution and the Bill of Rights

  1. Home
  2. For The Public
  3. Speakers Bureau
  4. Judicial Independence: Benchmarks Constitution and the Bill of Rights

<<Benchmarks: Raising the Bar on Civics Education

Constitution and the Bill of Rights

Presentations test basic knowledge about how government works; review the rights included in the first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution; explore how a judge would weigh the constitutionality of a law being challenged; and delve into two case studies that illuminate the workings of the courts.

Law Day 2018

Could You Pass the Test?

What’s Not in the Bill of Rights?

Is it Unconstitutional? The Case of the Scarlet Tag

Case Study: Is it Reasonable?

Florida v. Jardines

 



Law Day 2018

The theme of Law Day 2018 is “Separation of Powers: Framework for Freedom.” This presentation is suitable for Law Day or Law Week or for other events where the presenter will discuss how the U.S. government structure protects freedom by separating the powers of the three branches of government. Overview also includes a handout and an icebreaker activity. The PowerPoint guides the presentation.

Law Day 2018 Overview and Handouts

Law Day 2018 PowerPoint

Watch the 2018 Law Day webinar with Florida Supreme Court Justice Barbara Pariente and Annette Pitts, executive director of the Florida Law Related Education Association.

Could You Pass the Test?

In this activity, participants learn about their role as citizens and increase their knowledge of the U.S. and Florida constitutions. Two different formats are provided. Handouts include Test Your Knowledge bingo and questions from the U.S. Citizenship test. Estimated time to present: 20 to 30 minutes. Below are the links to an overview of the activity, which will guide your presentation, and all accompanying materials including a tip sheet on making a Benchmarks presentation. The overview will guide you in the timing and delivery of the activity.

Overview of activity and how to present: Could You Pass the Test? Option 1

Overview of activity and how to present: Could You Pass the Test? Option 2

Test Your knowledge Bingo

Citizenship Flashcards

Citizenship Test without answers

Citizenship Test with answers

Background paper

Tips for making a good Benchmarks presentation

 


What’s Not in the Bill of Rights?

In this activity, participants learn about the first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution and the process for amending the Constitution. Participants will consider proposing a 28th amendment. This is a great presentation for Constitution Week. Four handouts and a PowerPoint are included. Estimated time to present: 40 to 50 minutes. Below are the links to an overview of the activity, which will guide your presentation, and all accompanying materials including a tip sheet on making a Benchmarks presentation.

What’s Not in the Bill of Right Overview

What’s Not in the Bill of Rights

What’s Not in the Bill of Rights – First Ten Amendments

What’s Not in the Bill of Rights – Parts of the U.S. Constitution

What’s Not in the Bill of Rights – Proposal and Evaluation

What’s Not in the Bill of Rights PowerPoint

Tips for making a good Benchmarks presentation



Is It Unconstitutional? The Case of the Scarlet Tag

In this activity, participants review the rights guaranteed in the Bill of Rights and examine some factors to determine if a hypothetical law violates the U.S. Constitution. Three handouts are included and a PowerPoint. Estimated time to present: 30 minutes. Below are links to an overview of the activity, which will guide your presentation, and accompanying materials including a background paper and a tip sheet on making a Benchmarks presentation.

Overview of activity and how to present: Scarlet Tag

Is it Unconstitutional? PowerPoint

Hypothetical Case Study

Fictitious Statute

Evaluating Laws

Background Paper

Tips for making a good Benchmarks presentation


 


Case Study: Is It Reasonable?

This activity explores the courts and the Constitution through a case study. Participants will apply the Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and case precedent to a set of facts to experience judicial decision-making and the function of the federal courts. Materials are: An overview of how to present the activity, a PowerPoint, three handouts and a background paper for the presenter. The overview will guide you in the timing and delivery of the activity. A tips sheet for making Benchmarks presentations is included.

Case Study: Is It Reasonable

Is It Reasonable PowerPoint

Scott v. Harris Facts of the Case

Decision Form

Warm Up Handout: Translate It: Fourth Amendment

Background Material for Presenter

Tips for making a good Benchmarks presentation



Florida v. Jardines

This presentation uses a case study to explore the courts and the U.S. Constitution. Participants apply both the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution and case precedent to a set of facts to experience judicial decision-making.

Overview of the activity and How to Present: Florida v. Jardines: Is a sniff a search

Florida v. Jardines PowerPoint

Warm-up Activity: Privacy Worksheet Drawing the Line

Handout1: Florida v. Jardines Fact of the Case

Handout 2: Case Precedent

Decision Forms

Return to Benchmarks