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July 1, 2018 Disciplinary Actions

Disciplinary Actions

Prepared by The Florida Bar’s Public Information and Bar Services Department

The Florida Supreme Court in recent court orders disciplined 21 attorneys — revoking the licenses of four, suspending 12, and publicly reprimanding five. Three attorneys also were placed on probation.

Thomas R. Busatta, Sr., 12995 S. Cleveland Ave., Suite 47, Ft. Myers, suspended for six months, effective 30 days from an April 26 court order. (Admitted to practice: 2009) In handling several cases, Busatta lacked diligence and competence. Busatta failed to properly represent a client which resulted in over $6,000 attorney fee judgment against the client.  In another matter, Busatta tasked inexperienced associates with representing clients in a civil case which resulted in numerous errors and a more than $25,000 attorney fee judgment against the clients.  In another matter, Busatta was dismissed due to a conflict of interest. He also failed to adequately communicate with clients and failed to timely respond in writing to official Bar inquiries. (Case No. SC17-1769)

Aldo Guillermo Busot, Jr., 901 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Suite 204, Coral Gables, suspended for three years, effective 60 days from an April 19 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1987) Busot filed a complaint on a client’s behalf in September 2011 and set the case for trial in March 2013. Thereafter, Busot neglected the client matter, delayed the case, and failed to comply with deadlines in the pretrial scheduling orders. (Case No. SC17-1803)

Dayton Michael Cramer,  332 Winnstead Ct., Tallahassee, suspended until further order of the court, effective April 19, following an April 3 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1971)  Cramer was found guilty by a jury of attempted enticement of a minor to engage in sexual activity.  (Case No. SC18-496)

Lisa Ehrenreich, 2121 N. Bayshore Drive, Apt. 408, Miami, to be publicly reprimanded by publication in the Southern Reporter,   following an April 12 court order. (Admitted to practice: 2007) Further, Ehrenreich shall attend ethics school and be placed on probation for three years. She shall also pay restitution of more than $11,000 to three clients.  Ehrenreich and her two partners were the owners and managing partners of a law group that provided foreclosure defense and mortgage modification services. They engaged in a billing practice that resulted in the firm’s charging and collecting clearly excessive or illegal fees. In addition to the fees, Ehrenreich and her partners delegated the client matters to inexperienced associates and failed to keep clients reasonably informed.  (Case No. SC18-465)

Michael Lewis Forte, 100 N. Tampa St., Suite 2000, Tampa, to be publicly reprimanded by publication in the Southern Reporter, following an April 26 court order. (Admitted to practice: 2002) Forte shall also complete the Advanced Trial Tactics Seminar within one year of the Court’s order. In representing a defendant in a negligence lawsuit, Forte violated the court’s directions on a least five occasions and exposed the jury to inadmissible evidence. A new trial was ordered when the judge concluded that  Forte’s actions were improper and deliberate, and created a miscarriage of  justice. Forte was ordered to pay sanctions to the plaintiff of more than $9,600. (Case No. SC18-516)

Philip Maurice Gerson, 1980 Coral Way, Miami, suspended for 30 days effective April 13, following an April 11 court order. (Admitted to practice:1970)  Gerson violated Bar rules governing attorneys conflicts of interest involving current and former clients. (Case No. SC16-1006)

David Peter Ginzberg, 9900 W. Sample Road #317, Coral Springs. The court granted Ginzburg’s petition for a disciplinary revocation, with leave to seek readmission after five years, effective 30 days from an April 19 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1984) Disciplinary revocation is tantamount to disbarment. Disciplinary matters pending against Ginzberg included misappropriation of client funds and failure to render services after being retained. (Case No. SC18-346)

Kevin Lawrence Hagen, 3531 Griffin Road, Ft. Lauderdale, suspended for 10 days, effective 30 days from an April 19 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1994) Hagen was publicly reprimanded by a federal court committee, and prohibited from accepting any new cases in the Southern District of Florida for six months thereafter. Hagen and his client repeatedly failed to comply with court orders and failed to appear in court. (Case No. SC18-490)

Steven Kent Hunter, 6915 S.W. 57th Ave., Suite 208, Coral Gables, suspended for 30 days effective April 12, following an April 11 court order. (Admitted to practice:1976)  Hunter violated Bar rules governing attorneys conflicts of interest involving current and former clients.  (Case No. SC16-1006)

Alexandra Brzostowicki Kontos, 200 E. Broward Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale, to be publicly reprimanded by publication in the Southern Reporter,
following an April 12 court order. (Admitted to practice: 2009) Further, Kontos shall attend ethics school and be placed on probation for three years. Kontos and her two partners were the owners and managing partners of a law group that provided foreclosure defense and mortgage modification services. They engaged in a billing practice that resulted in the firm’s charging and collecting clearly excessive or illegal fees. In addition to the fees, Kontos and her partners delegated the client  matters to inexperienced associates and failed to keep clients reasonably informed.  (Case No. SC18-463)

Kenneth Joseph Kukec, 1128 S.W. 10th Ave., Miami, suspended for three years, effective immediately, following an April 27 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1986) Kukec was found in contempt for noncompliance. He failed to comply with the terms of a September 22, 2017, suspension order. Specifically, Kukec was required to notify his clients, opposing counsel, and tribunals of his suspension, and provide the Bar within 30 days a sworn affidavit listing the names and addresses of all persons and entities that were furnished a copy of his suspension order. (Case No. SC18-305)

Walter C. Little, 502 S. Fremont Ave., Apt. 228, Tampa, suspended until further order, effective 30 days from an April 2 court order. (Admitted to practice: 2001) Little pleaded guilty and was adjudicated guilty in federal court of conspiring to commit securities fraud/insider trading. He was sentenced to 27 months of imprisonment, followed  by three years of supervised release, forfeiture of more than $452,000 and a $100 monetary fine. (Case No. SC18-479)

Madsen Marcellus, Jr., 16921 N.E. 6th Ave., North Miami Beach, suspended until further order, effective 30 days from an April 25 court order. (Admitted to practice: 2003) Marcellus provided uncredible testimony regarding his dissolution of marriage and he failed to abide by the final order on the petition for dissolution of marriage with respect to the marital home. He also failed to appear in court for scheduled hearings regarding the matter.  (Case No. SC16-1773)

Byron John Nenos, Jr., 3853 Northdale Blvd., Suite 182, Tampa. The court granted Nenos’ petition for a disciplinary revocation, without leave to seek readmission, effective immediately, following an April 26 court order. (Admitted to practice:1990) Disciplinary revocation is tantamount to disbarment. Disciplinary matters pending against Nenos included misappropriation of client funds and failure to diligently pursue a client’s case. (Case No. SC18-371)

Vincent Joseph Pravato, 2101 W. Commercial Blvd., Suite 1500, Ft. Lauderdale. The court granted Pravato’s petition for a disciplinary revocation, with leave to seek readmission after five years, effective immediately, following an April 19 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1996) Disciplinary revocation is tantamount to disbarment. Disciplinary matters pending against Pravato pertained to criminal proceedings. Pravato pleaded guilty in court to one third-degree felony count of communications fraud, patient brokering, and unlawful use of a two-way communication device. (Case No. SC18-325)

William Burton Pringle III, P.O. Box 6340, Orlando. The court granted Pringle’s petition for a disciplinary revocation, with leave to seek readmission after five years, effective immediately, following an April 19 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1988)  Disciplinary revocation is tantamount to disbarment. A disciplinary matter pending against Pringle involved a felony. After a jury trial, Pringle was found guilty of one count of tax evasion and sentenced to three years in prison. (Case No. SC18-331)

Monica Reyes, 13400 S.W. 80th Ave., Miami, to be publicly reprimanded following an April 12 court order. (Admitted to practice: 2008) Further, Reyes shall be placed on probation for three years, following an April 12 court order. Reyes and her two partners were the owners and managing partners of a law group that provided foreclosure defense and mortgage modification services. They engaged in a billing practice that resulted in the firm’s charging and collecting clearly excessive or illegal fees. In addition to the fees, Reyes and her partners delegated the client matters to inexperienced associates and failed to keep clients reasonably informed.  (Case No. SC18-462)

Rolando Enrique Rodriguez, 6550 N. Wickham Road, Suite 1, Melbourne, suspended until further order, effective 30 days from an April 30 court order. (Admitted to practice: 2012)  According to a petition for emergency suspension, Rodriguez appeared to be causing great public harm by closing his law office without notice, abandoning his clients’ legal matters, and failing to protect his clients’ interests. He failed to respond in writing to complaints filed by six clients and to official Bar inquiries. He also failed to update his record Bar email and mailing addresses.  (Case No. SC18-632)

Andrew David Stine, 120 S. Olive Ave., Suite 402, West Palm Beach, suspended for 10 days effective 30 days from an April 12 court order. (Admitted to practice: 2003) Stine represented a woman in a child abuse case at a daycare center. He served a subpoena on the facility  to obtain surveillance video. Although the subpoena appeared to be valid and enforceable, it had no force and effect because a civil action had not been filed at the time the subpoena was served. (Case No. SC17-1341)

Daniel Edward Tropp, 5750 Collins Ave., Apt. 4A, Miami Beach, suspended for 10 days, effective 30 days from an April 12 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1992) Tropp represented a client in a workers’ compensation claim and a related negligence lawsuit. In the course of negotiating and settling both claims, Tropp violated Bar rules regarding failure to preserve settlement funds in trust as required, and disputed ownership of trust funds. (Case No. SC18-469)

Tonia Marie Troutwine, 901 Pennsylvania Ave., Suite 3-438, Miami Beach, to be publicly reprimanded following an April 26 court order. (Admitted to practice: 2003) Troutwine prepared a power of attorney to allow her to take over the financial and legal affairs of an elderly neighbor who was ill and suffering from dementia without the woman’s consent. Troutwine was dishonest in representations she made to a law enforcement officer, and she also caused a notary to lose his license by knowingly giving him incorrect information about Florida law as it pertains to notaries.    (Case No. SC16-1266)

As an official arm of the Florida Supreme Court, The Florida Bar and its Department of Lawyer Regulation are charged with administering a statewide disciplinary system to enforce Supreme Court rules of professional conduct for the 105,867 members of The Florida Bar. Key discipline case files that are public record are posted to attorneys’ individual online Florida Bar profiles. Additional information on the discipline system and how to file a complaint are available at .

Court orders are not final until time expires to file a rehearing motion and, if filed, determined. The filing of such a motion does not alter the effective date of the discipline. Disbarred lawyers may not re-apply for admission for five years. They are required to go through an extensive process that rejects many who apply. It includes a rigorous background check and retaking the Bar exam. Historically, less than five percent of disbarred lawyers seek readmission.