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Teagle named Judicial Qualifications Commission executive director

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Blan Teagle and the justice of the Supreme Court

Blan Teagle, center, has been named executive director of the Judicial Qualifications Commission. Teagle has worked in the Office of the State Courts Administrator for 27 years, most recently as deputy state courts administrator. He previously served as an attorney in the Legal Affairs and Education Division and as the chief of Court Education. Teagle is pictured here with the justices of the Supreme Court.

Blan Teagle is moving to serve Florida’s judicial branch in a different role as the new executive director of the Judicial Qualifications Commission later this month.

On February 6, justices of the Florida Supreme Court marked his years of service, most recently as deputy state courts administrator.

“Blan L. Teagle has always conducted himself in a manner that reflected credit to the state courts system, performed his duties in a most distinguished manner, earned the esteem and respect of jurists at all levels of the court system, and exhibited leadership on matters of great importance to the Florida Judicial Branch,” said Chief Justice Charles Canady, reading a proclamation of the court presented to Teagle.

Teagle has worked in the Office of the State Courts Administrator for 27 years, previously as an attorney in the Legal Affairs and Education Division and as the chief of Court Education.

“You have made great contributions to our branch and we are deeply grateful,” Chief Justice Canady said after presenting the Court’s proclamation.

Teagle’s work includes helping found the College of Advanced Judicial Studies and working to establish the mentor judge program, as well as initiatives regarding access to justice, judicial ethics, and guardianship.

Later in February Teagle will take over at the Judicial Qualifications Commission following the retirement of its previous executive director, Michael Schneider, in 2019. The commission was established as an independent body by the Florida Constitution in 1966. Its 15 members investigate allegations of judicial misconduct and, when it is found to have occurred, the commission recommends sanctions to the Florida Supreme Court.

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